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Reading the past like an open book – researchers use text to measure two hundred years of happiness

Was there such a thing as ‘the good old days’ when people were happier? Are current Government policies more or less likely to increase their citizens’ feelings of wellbeing? Using innovative methods researchers have built a new index that uses data from books and newspaper to track levels of national happiness from 1820. Their research could help governments to make better decisions about policy priorities.


Children bullied by friends and siblings are more likely to think about suicide in their early twenties

Depression, self-harm and suicidal ideation are more prominent in adults in their early twenties if they were bullied at home and at school, a study by researchers at the University of Warwick have found. Researchers stress that intervention is needed to educate people in bullying to reduce it.

Previous studies have identified that sibling bullying has an effect on mental health in adolescence, however researchers Professor Dieter Wolke and Dr. Slava Dantchev have now found children who were bullied by siblings and friends are more likely to harm themselves.

Wed 09 Oct 2019, 08:37 | Tags: psychology, Sciences

‘Building blocks’ of bird calls resemble human languages

The ‘building blocks’ of bird calls resemble those of human languages, new research from has found.

Tue 10 Sep 2019, 10:11 | Tags: research, psychology

Launch of a standardised tool to assess cognitive and language development in two year olds

A new paper published in The Lancet Child & Adolescent Health provides standardised scores for The Parent Report of Children’s Abilities Revised (PARCA-R) questionnaire. The PARCA-R is recommended for routine use in the UK to screen for cognitive and language developmental delay in children born preterm and can be completed by parents in 10 to 15 minutes.

Mon 12 Aug 2019, 15:12 | Tags: research, psychology

Neurocognitive basis for free will set out for the first time

Do human beings genuinely have free will? Philosophers and theologians have wrestled with this question for centuries and have set out the ‘design features’ of free will – but how do our brains actually fulfil them? A University of Warwick academic has answered this question for the first time in a paper published today in Proceedings of the Royal Society B.

Wed 31 Jul 2019, 11:37 | Tags: Religion, Brain, research, psychology, Philosophy

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