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Identified: A mechanism that protects plant fertility from stress

As Temperatures rise due to global warming the need to protect plants from stressful conditions has increased, as stress can cause a loss in yield and cause further impact economically. A consortium led by the University of Warwick have successfully identified two proteins that protect crops from stress, which is key in safeguarding food production.

Mon 01 Mar 2021, 10:08 | Tags: Plants, climate change, School of Life Sciences, Evolution, Sciences

Chemical memory in plants affects chances of offspring survival

Researchers at the University of Warwick have uncovered the mechanism that allows plants to pass on their ‘memories’ to offspring, which results in growth and developmental defects.


Building blocks of language evolved 30-40 million years ago

The capacity for language is built upon our ability to understand combinations of words and the relationships between them, but the evolutionary history of this ability is little understood. Now, researchers from the University of Warwick have managed to date this capacity to at least 30-40 million years ago, the last common ancestor of monkeys, apes and humans.

Thu 22 Oct 2020, 09:24 | Tags: psychology, linguistics, Evolution, language, Sciences

Warwick researcher to investigate the link between apes and the evolution of human language

Dr Adriano R. Lameira, from the Department of Psychology at the University of Warwick, has been awarded a prestigious UKRI Future Leader Fellowship, for his project: The ape and the first word: Understanding the origins and evolution of the first linguistic structures in the human clade through comparative research.

Thu 15 Oct 2020, 10:56 | Tags: psychology, linguistics, UKRI, Evolution, speech, Sciences

Breakthrough in studying ancient DNA from Doggerland that separates the UK from Europe

Thousands of years ago the UK was physically joined to the rest of Europe through an area known as Doggerland. However, a marine inundation took place during the mid-holocene, separating the British landmass from the rest of Europe, which is now covered by the North Sea. Scientists from the School of Life Sciences at the University of Warwick have studied sedimentary ancient DNA (sedaDNA) from sediment deposits in the southern North Sea, an area which has not previously been linked to a tsunami that occurred 8150 years ago.

Thu 16 Jul 2020, 11:20 | Tags: UK, Archaeology, School of Life Sciences, Life Sciences, Evolution

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