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New ID pictures of conducting polymers discover a surprise ABBA fan

  • First ever detailed pictures of conjugated polymers – which conduct electricity and are highly sought after – captured with novel visualisation technique developed by University of Warwick
  • New approach realises Richard Feynman’s famous remark that it would be very easy to make an analysis of any complicated chemical substance; all one would have to do would be to look at it and see where the atoms are”
  • Polymers need alternating pattern of “A” monomer & smaller “B” monomer to conduct (ABAB), but the researchers discovered surprising gaps & defects in polymer structure –an ABBA pattern
Fri 15 June 2018, 21:14 | Tags: Physics, Chemistry, molecular, polymer, Polymers, Sciences

£1.2 million boost to crop research at University of Warwick

The University of Warwick is set to receive £1.2 million in funding to support its pioneering research in improving the resilience, sustainability and productivity of UK crops, Environment Secretary Michael Gove has announced today.

Fri 15 June 2018, 10:06 | Tags: agriculture, UK, research, Life Sciences, crop centre, crops, Sciences

Bad news becomes hysteria in crowds, new research shows

News stories about terrorism, disease outbreaks, natural disasters, and other potential threats become increasingly negative, inaccurate and hysterical when passed from person to person, according to new research by the University of Warwick.


Globular clusters 4 billion years younger than previously thought

Globular clusters could be up to 4 billion years younger than previously thought, new research led by the University of Warwick has found.

Comprised of hundreds of thousands of stars densely packed into a tight ball, globular clusters had been thought to be almost as old as the Universe itself - but thanks to newly developed research models it has been shown that they could be as young as 9 billion years old rather than 13 billion.

Mon 04 June 2018, 13:56 | Tags: Astrophysics, Sciences

Atomically thin nanowires convert heat to electricity more efficiently

Waste heat can be converted to electricity more efficiently using one-dimensional nanoscale materials as thin as an atom – ushering a new way of generating sustainable energy – thanks to new research by the University of Warwick.


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