Skip to main content Skip to navigation

What have we updated?

About this page

We will always update this page when we make significant changes to course content. This does not necessarily include minor corrections or formatting.

If you ever want to ask us about a change, you can contact us at webeditor at warwick dot ac dot uk.


16th July 2021

Modules

We have updated the core module descriptions for two modules.

Dynamics and Thermal Dynamics

Previous description:

You will gain a thorough understanding of the fundamental concepts of thermodynamics and the dynamics of mechanical systems. You will study kinematics and kinetics using Cartesian and curvilinear coordinates in 1, 2 and 3 dimensions and learn to solve a range of problems in using different base vector systems. You will learn the principles of impulse-momentum and work-energy and how these principles are applied to solve problems in dynamics. You will develop and apply your understanding of the First and Second Laws of Thermodynamics, and learn to make appropriate assumptions to simplify and model real-life engineering problems.

New description:

Dynamics and Thermodynamics

You will gain a thorough understanding of the fundamental concepts of thermodynamics and the dynamics of mechanical systems. You will study the motion of an object and its causes in one and two dimensions and learn to solve a range of problems using appropriate coordinate systems. You will learn how to use quantities such as impulse, momentum, work and energy conservation to solve problems in dynamics. You will develop an understanding of engineering thermodynamics, considering the properties of working fluids and mechanisms of heat transfer. You will develop and apply an understanding of the First and Second Laws of Thermodynamics, and learn to make appropriate assumptions to model real-life engineering situations, including engine cycles.

Systems Modelling, Simulation and Computation

Previous description:

Systems modelling allows you to gather the information necessary to make decisions concerning the design and development of engineering solutions, or to investigate systems that are too costly, difficult or unethical to investigate physically. Vast numbers of bespoke software solutions are available, so you will focus on designing and programming models from first principles, learning how to apply mathematical techniques and avoid modelling errors. You will consider design principles that ensure robust development, covering verification and validation techniques. You will practice representing multi-domain systems graphically, derive models from data, and construct a simulation model to predict system responses.

New description:

Systems Modelling, Simulation and Computation

Systems modelling is an essential skill that underpins all engineering disciplines, allowing complex engineering problems to be approximated using mathematical models. Systems modelling provides necessary information to make decisions in the design and development of engineering solutions or to investigate systems that are too costly, difficult or unethical to investigate physically. This module focuses on the design and programming of models from first principles by the application of mathematical techniques and avoidance of modelling errors. You will learn how to: represent multi-domain systems graphically, derive models from data, construct a simulation model to predict system responses, and consider design principles that ensure robust model development (covering verification and validation techniques).

24th March 2021

Teaching

On the 'Teaching' tab below 'Overall workload' we updated the text with the correct information.

Previous content:
Typical contact hours
Timetables will vary from week to week. In the first two terms of first and second year, students typically receive around 13 contact hours (of lectures, seminars and tutorials) per week in addition to between 2 and 12 hours of laboratory sessions. Your final year will be more project heavy, and contact hours will reduce.

Amended content:
Overall workload
The expected total study time is normally 1200 hours per year (average of 40 hours per week).

The hours below are based on a typical pathway through the course and could vary significantly, particularly from Year Two onwards. The hours will heavily depend on module or course choices and are subject to change.

Year One
350 hours of lectures, seminars and similar. 750 hours of independent study. 100 hours of project work.

Year Two
320 hours of lectures, seminars and similar. 640 hours of independent study. 240 hours of project work.

Year Three
260 hours of lectures, seminars and similar. 640 hours of independent study. 300 hours of project work.

Year Four
260 hours of lectures, seminars and similar. 640 hours of independent study. 300 hours of project work.

Read more about our course structures on the Engineering website.

Assessment

On the 'Assessment' tab we updated the text with the correct information.

Previous content:
Assessment is through examinations and coursework. Coursework assessment can include laboratory reports, projects, essays and oral presentations.

Amended content:
You will experience a variety of assessment methods, and can expect to mostly take (online or face-to-face) examinations and complete coursework assignments.

The percentages below are based on a typical pathway through the course and could vary significantly, particularly from Year Two onwards. The percentages will heavily depend on module or course choices and are subject to change.

Year One
20% Coursework, 20% Practical or Project, 60% Exam.

Year Two
25% Coursework, 25% Practical or Project, 50% Exam.

Year Three
25% Coursework, 35% Practical or Project, 40% Exam.

Year Four
25% Coursework, 35% Practical or Project, 40% Exam.

12th March 2021

Modules

On the 'Modules' tab we revised the modules listed as some were incorrect for Year One. The following were listed twice:

Introduction to Engineering: Professionalism and Practice
Dynamics and Thermodynamics

We also revised the core module 'Group Project' module description.

Previous content:
Your group project will give you experience of teamwork within a realistic and industry-relevant engineering environment. You will share your knowledge and understanding in order to specify and solve a substantial engineering problem or user need through the joint creation and development of a product, process or system. You will use advanced problem-solving skills and innovative techniques, materials or methods to deliver your intended outputs. The acquisition of valuable transferable skills will be an integral part of your work, including those of project management, leadership, communication, time management, professional ethics and risk assessment.

Amended content:
MEng students participate in a large group project worth 25% of the year, which simulates the multidisciplinary working practices you will experience in your career. Students from all specialist courses work together on these projects allowing you to develop more advanced skills for the workplace and form new friendships and professional networks.

Popular projects include the IMechE Formula Student racing car competition, Warwick University satellite project (WUSAT), Severn Trent reservoir design, ICE shaping the world infrastructure design for poor communities, building search-and-rescue devices with Warwick Mobile Robotics, or creating a human-powered submarine.

The MEng final-year multidisciplinary group project is unique to the four-year degree and is not something that you would normally find as part of a one year standalone Master’s.

Initial launch

This page was launched on 2nd March 2021.