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About this page

We will update this page when we make significant changes to course information. This does not necessarily include minor corrections or formatting.

If you ever want to ask us about a change, you can contact us at webeditor at warwick dot ac dot uk.


10th March 2022

We have amended the module description on the 'Modules' tab for Macroeconomics 1, as it was previously incorrect.

Previous content:

On this module, you will gain a thorough grounding in the basic principles of microeconomics and study several applications of theory, with the aim of being able to demonstrate your knowledge of major topics, including consumer theory and behavioural economics; government policy and the links to welfare and the decisions of the firm under producer theory, including profit maximisation and cost minimisation, You will also consider the model of demand and supply, different models that explain how firms compete, including oligopoly and collusion, and the work of the major theorists Bertrand, Cournot and Stackelberg, including game theory. You will learn to use appropriate terminology in a wide range of more advanced topics relevant to microeconomics and will consider all of these topics using both a mathematical and graphical approach.

Read more about this moduleLink opens in a new window, including the methods of teaching and assessment (content applies to 2021/22 year of study).

Revised content:

You will consider the fundamental determinants of Gross Domestic Product, unemployment and inflation and look at how these variables interact in the short-run. By the module’s end, you should have become familiar with a range of macroeconomic issues, including topics as varied as data sources, theories of consumption and investment, government finances, the Phillips curve, and monetary rules. You will be able to use the correct terminology and measurement practices of macroeconomics. There will be opportunities to apply your learning by devising simple structural models, including definitions, assumptions and the behavioural characteristics of key agents, using both mathematical and graphical techniques.

Read more about this moduleLink opens in a new window, including the methods of teaching and assessment (content applies to 2021/22 year of study).