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Events calendar

 
 
Fri 11 Jan, '19
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Classical Connections Seminar Lecture: Dr Tom Phillips (Manchester) "Shelley's Plastic Hellenism"
OC 0.05

Dr Tom Phillips is lecturer in Classical Literature at the University of Manchester. He is the author of Pindar's Library: Performance Poetry and Material Texts (Oxford, 2016) and of numerous contributions on Greek classical and hellenistic literature.

This talk explores connections in the work of P.B. Shelley between his conception of the poet’s capacity to generate forms of ‘sympathy’ with the natural world and historical phenomena, and his responses to ancient Greek poetry. Examining Shelley’s translation of the Homeric Hymn to Hermes and some passages from ‘Ode to Liberty’, I argue that both translation and allusion aim to uncover morally and intellectually transformative aspects of ancient texts that only become available for recognition by prefiguring the futurity realized in Shelley’s own poetry. Attending to such connections is a valuable starting point for thinking about the untimeliness of our relations with classical antiquity and its literature.

Wed 16 Jan, '19
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Work in Progress Seminar
Oculus

Prof. Alison Cooley (University of Warwick) "Reflections on the SCP"

Simone Mucci (University of Warwick) "Some problems related to Agathokles of Cyzicus (FGrHist 472)"

Wed 23 Jan, '19
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WiP Guest Speaker: Dr William Mack (Birmingham)
Oculus 1.02

Dr William Mack (University of Birmingham)

"Assembly Decrees or Oracles? Consulting Public Authority in the Archaic World"

Dr William Mack is a Senior Lecturer in Ancient Greek History and Culture at the University of Birmingham. He specialises in the study of interstate relations between the Greek City states.

Wed 30 Jan, '19
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Work in Progress Seminar
Oculus 1.02

Alessandra Tafaro (University of Warwick) "Obliterating Domitian's Memory: from Inscriptions to Martial's Epigrams 10."

Giles Penman (University of Warwick) "Classical motifs and the memorabilia of the Great War"

Wed 6 Feb, '19
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WiP Guest Speaker: Prof. Michèle Lowrie (Chicago)
Oculus 1.02

Prof. Michèle Lowrie (Chicago)

"An Empire of Security and Care"

Prof. Michèle Lowrie is Andrew W. Mellon Professor of Classics at the University of Chicago. Her reseach focuses on the intersection of ideology and literary form in Roman literature and its reception. She is the author of Writing, Performance, and Authority in Augustan Rome (OUP 2009) and Horace's Narrative Odes (OUP 1997). In 2018, she delivered the J.H. Gray Lecture at the University of Cambridge on the subject of the idea of security in Roman thought and literature.

Wed 27 Feb, '19
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WiP Guest Speaker: Prof. Dr. Andreas Schwab (LMU München)
Oculus 1.02

Prof. Dr. Andreas Schwab (Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München)

Prof. Dr. Schwab specialises in ancient religion, Greek philosophy, historiography and Christian literature in late antiquity.

http://www.klassphil.uni-muenchen.de/personen/professoren/schwab_andreas/index.html

Organiser: LMU Munich

The event is sponsored by LMUexcellent (DFG Excellence Initiative).

Wed 6 Mar, '19
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Work in Progress Seminar
Oculus 1.02
George Green (University of Oxford and University of Warwick) "LA-ICP-MS: data and conclusions from the Ashmolean’s collection of Roman gold"
Jonathan Madge (University of Warwick) Title to be decided.
Thu 7 Mar, '19
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Classical Connections Public Lecture: Dr Tessa Roynon (Oxford) "Black Classicism: some theory, some practices and some dilemmas"
MS.04

Dr Tessa Roynon is Teaching and Research Fellow at the Rothermere American Institute at the University of Oxford. She is a specialist in modern North American literature, particularly African American literature, in Anglophone literature of the black diaspora, and in Classical Reception studies. She is the author of The Cambridge Introduction to Toni Morrison (CUP 2012), and Toni Morrison and the Classical Tradition (OUP 2013) and co-editor of the acclaimed interdisciplinary essay collection, African Athena: New Agendas (OUP 2011, with Daniel Orrells and Gurminder Bhambra).

The Lecture is generously funded by IATL as Public Lecture for the undergraduate module 'Africa and the Making of Classical Literature'.

Wed 13 Mar, '19
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Work in Progress Seminar: MARS
Fri 15 Mar, '19
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Classical Connections Public Lecture: Prof. Patrice Rankine (Richmond) "Classical Texts and Contemporary Images: American African Problems"
OC 0.01

Prof. Patrice Rankine is Professor of Classics and Dean of the School of Arts and Sciences at the University of Richmond. His research focusses on African American literature and the reception of the Classics among black American authors. He is the author of Ulysses in Black: Ralph Ellison, Classicism, and African American Literature (The University of Wisconsin Press 2006), Aristotle and Black Drama: A Theater of Civil Disobedience (Waco: Baylor University Press, 2013) and co-editor of the Oxford University Handbook: Greek Drama in the Americas (with Kathryn Bosher, Fiona Macintosh, and Justine McConnell; Oxford University Press, 2015).

The Lecture is generously funded by IATL as Public Lecture for the undergraduate module 'Africa and the Making of Classical Literature'.

Wed 24 Apr, '19
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WiP Guest Speaker: Dr John Pearce (KCL) 'Hares, hounds and snares: tracking the hunt on Rome's frontiers and beyond'

Dr John Pearce (KCL)

'Hares, hounds and snares: tracking the hunt on Rome's frontiers and beyond'

Dr John Pearce is Senior Lecturer in Archaeology at KCL. His work covers Roman Archaeology in North-West Europe and Italy, with particular interest in the importance of landscapes, documents and literacy, death and burial and small finds.

Wed 1 May, '19
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Classical Connections - IAS VF Public Lecture: Dr Dan-el Padilla Peralta (Princeton) "The Etruscan Negro: from Coin to Memory to Racial Politics"
OC 0.04

Dr Dan-el Padilla Peralta is Assistant Professor of Classics at Princeton University, where he is affiliated with the university's Center for Human Values and Program in Latino Studies. His work situates the religious and cultural history of the Roman Republic in diallogue with anthropology, sociology, economics, and comparative and global histories of slavery. In this public lecture, he will focus on the complicity of modern histories of Roman republican culture in the (re)production of colonial and postcolonial configurations of race.

The lecture is generously funded by the IAS.

Fri 3 May, '19
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Racing The Classics - Workshop
AC.02-AC.03

Organised by Sasha-Mae Eccleston (Brown) and Dan-el Padilla Peralta (Princeton), in collaboration with Rosa Andújar (KCL) and Elena Giusti (Warwick)

Wed 8 May, '19
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Work in Progress Seminar: Guest Speaker: Catharine Edwards

Catharine Edwards (Birbeck, University of London)

Catharine Edwards is a Professor of Classics and Ancient Histiory at Birbeck. Her research focuses on Rome during the early principate, with particularly reference to Seneca the Younger.

Thu 9 May, '19
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Classical Connections - IAS VF Public Lecture: Dr Sasha-Mae Eccleston (Brown) "Speaking (of) Greek: Reflections on Value in Post-9/11 Receptions of Epic"

Dr Sasha-Mae Eccleston is Assistant Professor of Classics at Brown University. Her research examines the interstices between moral philosophy, ecocriticism, and literature from the Roman Empire; Classical reception (throughout the African Diaspora); and critical race theory, Classics, and educational reform. This lecture is part of her ongoing project Epic Events, which explains how authors of works produced after 9/11, especially those from newly racialized groups in the U.S., use the Greco-Roman canon to negotiate the state’s efforts to define the terrorist attacks of 2001 as an epoch making event. Of interest to Americanists, scholars interested in museum studies, literature, popular culture, and ecocriticism.

The lecture is generously funded by the IAS.

Thu 16 May, '19
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Classical Connections Seminar Lecture: Dr Thomas Biggs (Georgia) "Agamben, Iustitium, and the Poetic "State of Exception" in Lucan's Bellum Civile"

Dr Thomas Biggs is Assistant Professor of Classics at the University of Georgia. He is an expert in Latin literature, and has worked especially on connections between epic and historiography, cultural history, poetics, Roman art and architecture and the Punic Wars.

Wed 22 May, '19
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Work in Progress Seminar

Kieren Johns (University of Warwick) "Journeys in space and time: Constructing identity in the Severan Empire"