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Dr. Emmanuela Bakola

ebakola4.jpgAssistant Professor of Ancient Greek Language and Literature
Email: e dot bakola at warwick dot ac dot uk

Room H.228
Humanities Building, University Road
University of Warwick
Coventry, CV4 7AL

About

I joined the University of Warwick in 2015, initially as Leverhulme Research Fellow and from January 2016 as Assistant Professor of Ancient Greek Language and Literature. Before coming to Warwick, I held a British Academy Postdoctoral Research Fellowship at UCL (2007-12) and a Leverhulme Early Career Fellowship at King’s College London (2013-15).

I am originally from Greece, and have been living in London since 2000.

Research interests

I have been researching Greek theatre (tragedy, comedy and satyr play) since 2001. In my previous research, I explored the relationship of ancient comedy to other literary genres, ancient literary criticism and methodological questions of working with fragments. My published work included the OUP monograph Cratinus and the art of comedy and the co-edited CUP volume Greek comedy and the discourse of genres.

More recently, I have become interested in the theatricality of Greek tragedy (especially tragic space), in Greek religion and in the intersection of classics and anthropology. I am working on a monograph entitled The Erinyes and the wealth of the earth: Cosmos, nature and resources in Aeschylean tragedy. I seek to demonstrate that Aeschylean tragedy is profoundly preoccupied with humanity’s relationship to the earth and its resources. I offer a close (re-)reading of five plays by applying an interdisciplinary framework informed by spatial criticism, cultural anthropology and classical scholarship. I seek to show that Aeschylus explores the relationship of man to the earth through its use of space, imagery, and engagement with religion and ritual. Although the relationship of man and earth has a metaphysical character, in Aeschylus it is mainly reflected upon through economic concepts (production, consumption, waste) and is connected to socio-political issues which in all times are linked to environmental concerns, especially gender, hegemony and justice.

Until the monograph Erinyes and the Wealth of the Earth is completed, you can find some of my publications on this project here. You can also view a research paper which analyses keystones of the project (the centrality of the Erinyes, and how they are connected with 'wealth' and 'earth') here. My definition of 'earth' in Aeschylean tragedy is explained here.

As part of my project on Greek literature and the natural environment, I have organised two major symposia, namely Greek Theatre, Landscape and Environment (KCL, Feb 2014), and Locating the Daimonic: Daimones, Spaces and Places in the Greek World (KCL, March 2015) and one workshop, Craft Process and Cultural Response: Making, and thinking about making, in Greco-Roman antiquity (KCL, Oct 2015).

Publications

Book:

Cratinus and the Art of Comedy, Oxford University Press, 2010

Co-edited volumes:

Bakola, E., Prauscello, L. and M. Telò (eds.) Greek Comedy and the Discourse of Genres, Cambridge University Press, 2013

Bakola, E., Lunn-Rockliffe, S (eds.) Locating the daimonic in the Ancient Greek World, Taylor & Francis / Routledge (under contract)

Articles and chapters:

• ‘Textile symbolism and the ‘wealth of the earth’: creation, production and destruction in the ‘tapestry scene’ of Aeschylus’ Oresteia (Ag. 905-78)’, in Harlow, M., Nosch, M.-L. and G. Fanfani (eds.) Spinning Fates and the Song of the Loom: the Use of Textiles, Clothing and Cloth Production as Metaphor, Symbol and Narrative, Oxford 2016: 115-136.

• ‘Daimones between the visible and the invisible: Interior spaces and uncanny Erinyes in Aeschylus’ Oresteia’ in Bakola, E. and Lunn-Rockliffe, S. (eds.) Locating the daimonic in the Ancient Greek World, Taylor & Francis / Routledge (under contract, forthcoming 2017; the argument is presented here.)

• ‘Space, place and the metallurgical imagination of the Prometheus trilogy' in Braund, D., Hall, E. and Wyles, R. (eds) Greek Theatre and Performance Culture around the Black Sea, Cambridge University Press (submitted, under contract)

• ‘ ‘Aeschylus’, earth and the cult of the tomb’ in Graziosi, B. and Goldschmidt, N. (eds.) Tombs of the Poets: Between Text and Material Culture, (submitted)

• ‘Interiority, the ‘deep earth’, and the spatial symbolism of Darius’ apparition in the Persians of Aeschylus’, Proceedings of the Cambridge Philological Society (CCJ) 60, 2014: 1-36.

• ‘Crime and Punishment: Cratinus, Aeschylus’ Oresteia, and the metaphysics and the politics of wealth’ in Bakola, E., Prauscello, L. and Telo, M. (eds.) Greek Comedy and the Discourse of Genres, 2013: 226-55.

• ‘Cratinus reads Aeschylus: The Erinyes and the wealth of the earth’ in E. Tamiolaki (ed.) New Trends in Ancient Comedy, Rhethymnon 2014, 17-44 (in modern Greek)

• ‘The Drunk, the Reformer and the Teacher: Agonistic Poetics and the Construction of Persona in the Comic Poets of the Fifth Century’, Proceedings of the Cambridge Philological Society (CCJ) 54 (2008), 1-29

• Nine entries for The Encyclopedia of Greek Comedy, Sommerstein, A. (ed.), Wiley-Blackwell press, on various themes

• ‘Old Comedy Disguised as Satyr Play: A New Reading of Cratinus’ Dionysalexandros (POxy 663)’ ZPE 154 (2005) 46-58

• ‘A missed joke in Aristophanes’ Wasps 1265-74’ Classical Quarterly 55 (2005), 609-13 In progress:

• ‘Earth as oikos and oikos as earth: Interiority and the Eco-logical Discourse in Aeschylus’ Oresteia’ chapter for Hunt, A. and Marlow, H. (eds.) Greening the Gods: Ecology and Theology in the Ancient World (under contract)

Teaching and supervision

I am primary supervisor to a PhD project on 'Metals and metallurgy in Greek literary imagination'.

Administrative roles

  • Outreach and Public Engagement Officer

Office hours

Mondays 12.00-13.00 and Tuesdays 10.00-11.00, or by appointment



Video about current research

'Where are the Erinyes in Aeschylus' Oresteia?', Invited Research Seminar, University of Reading.

This paper contains the material of my chapter "Daimones between the visible and the invisible: Interior spaces and uncanny Erinyes in Aeschylus’ Oresteia" (which I would be happy to share by e-mail, if you were interested.)