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Warwick Screening

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wsWarwick Screening is a multidisciplinary team of researchers led by Dr Sian Taylor-Phillips. We specialise in evaluating health screening for a variety of conditions. Our work spans primary research, evidence review for national and international policy-makers, and specialist teaching.

Evidence review

We undertake evidence review for national and international policy-makers, including the UK National Screening Committee who advise UK government on screening policy. Recent reviews include evaluating the evidence for offering pregnant women non-invasive prenatal testing (NIPT) for trisomies and culture for Group B Streptococcus, adding Tyrosinemia and Long-chain hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency screening using the newborn blood spot test, and whether to add density and ultrasound measurements to the NHS breast screening programme.

All national reviews are available here.

We also research the methods of undertaking these reviews, find out more about that here.

Breast screening

Warwick Screening leads trials, observational research and evidence review of breast cancer screening. We use large observational studies and trials to increase statistical power, so we can measure impacts on women screened. We specialise in pragmatic integrated trials (sometimes called quality improvement trials) where parts of the trial are integrated into the screening programme.

Find out more about breast screening research at Warwick.

Teaching

We offer a Master's level module and a one day course in Health Screening in collaboration with PHE Screening. The course content includes how to decide whether to start or change screening for a range of different diseases. This includes the UK National Screening Committee criteria, test evaluation, health economics, ethics and quality assurance.

Social and ethical implications of genetic screening

Dr Felicity Boardman in the Medicine, Society and Ethics group focuses on the social and ethical implications of reproductive screening, particularly when used in conjunction with emerging genomic technologies such as whole genome sequencing. Find out more about this work.