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Glassblower sought to support University’s chemistry research

Glassblower sought to support University’s chemistry research

  • New scientific glassblower sought following the retirement of last post holder after 50 years service to the University
  • Vital move to keep the skills alive and at hand for researchers.
  • Research requires glassware that cannot be bought commercially and would take too long for outsourced production.
  • Glassware would be used to further Warwick research into, amongst other things, developing new cancer drugs and low energy chemical processes and as part of the University’s work as a global centre of excellence for Polymer Chemistry.

The University of Warwick is on the lookout for a scientific glassblower – for the first time in over 50 years.Mr Peter Brindley, the retired glassblower at work. Credit: University of Warwick

Based in the Department of Chemistry, the vacancy follows the retirement of Warwick’s previous glassblower, Peter Brindley, who had occupied the role since 1968.

By seeking a successor Warwick aims to retain in-house and keep alive the skills required to design, construct, install, repair and modify the precision glassware apparatus that is unobtainable commercially but crucial to Warwick’s research.

Commenting on search for the University’s new glassblower Dr Dorothea Mangels, the Technical Services Manager for the Department of Chemistry at the University of Warwick said:

“Chemistry research depends on having access to good quality glassware.

“Researchers at Warwick Chemistry have been lucky enough to have Peter, with his vast experience and outstanding skill set, as someone to discuss their requirements with, get advice and have bespoke pieces made in-house without the wait times involved in outsourcing it to a commercial manufacturer for production.”

University of Warwick chemists are currently involved with a broad of research areas, including; developing novel cancer treatments using rare metals, low energy chemical processes, understanding mechanisms of disease and is a global centre of excellence for Polymer Chemistry.

Commenting on his 50 years working for Warwick and the skills involved with his work Peter Brindley said:

“When someone got a new project I got requests for new glass apparatus. I learnt something new every day as every piece was different to construct, fabricate and modify.

“Throughout the many years I met different students, academics, people and lots of different characters - it’s impossible to count them all!”

ENDS

25 MARCH 2019

NOTES TO EDITORS

For more information on the job role please visit: https://atsv7.wcn.co.uk/search_engine/jobs.cgi?SID=amNvZGU9MTc5NjMyNyZ2dF90ZW1wbGF0ZT0xNDU3Jm93bmVyPTUwNjI0NTImb3duZXJ0eXBlPWZhaXImYnJhbmRfaWQ9MCZ2YWNfeHRyYTUwNjI0NTIuNTJfNTA2MjQ1Mj0yMzk5MTcmcG9zdGluZ19jb2RlPTYzNQ==

High-res images available at:

https://warwick.ac.uk/services/communications/medialibrary/images/march2019/pb1.png

https://warwick.ac.uk/services/communications/medialibrary/images/march2019/pb3.png

https://warwick.ac.uk/services/communications/medialibrary/images/march2019/pb2.png

For further information please contact:

Alice Scott
Media Relations Manager – Science
University of Warwick
Tel: +44 (0) 2476 574 255 or +44 (0) 7920 531 221
E-mail: alice.j.scott@warwick.ac.uk

For further information please contact:

Alice Scott 
Media Relations Manager – Science
University of Warwick 
Tel: +44 (0) 2476 574 255 or +44 (0) 7920 531 221 
E-mail: alice.j.scott@warwick.ac.uk