Skip to main content Skip to navigation

Food Action and Research Midlands (FARM) Network

FARM graphic

The Food Action and Research Midlands (FARM) network was created in order to share understanding of current knowledge and particularly knowledge gaps between experts by experience, front line food poverty workers and campaigners and academic researchers. The aim is to use these co-created questions as a basis for campaigns, research and action.

The first workshop held on 2nd May 2019 at the University of Warwick was the first in what we hope is a series of workshops where experts by experience, front line food poverty workers and campaigners and academic researchers can work together to identify the knowledge gaps specifically in the Midlands region. Here is one participant's blog of the day:FARM participatory workshop

The launch meeting took place on 20th June (programme below) where we presented the findings of this workshop (report below) to a broad range of policymakers, investigators and activists working in the region in order to work together toward identifying evidence-based solutions.

We plan to keep the network linked through regular newsletters, disseminating information about appropriate funding streams and events.

Launch meeting - Programme

09.30 coffee

10.15 Talk: Laura Nott and Emeleye Westwood Food Power Sandwell: 'Ideal For All'...ensuring that people with disabilities have equal access to good food Slides

10.50 Talk: Wendy Eades: The cumulative impacts of welfare reform and austerity on the lived experiences of people in Coventry: what are the implications for food insecurity? Abstract

11.25 Coffee break

11.50 Talk: Andy Jolly: Household food insecurity amongst undocumented migrant families in Birmingham Slides

12.25 Talk: Catherine Price: Narratives of food poverty: online media representations in the West Midlands press Slides

13.00 Lunch & posters of projects & research going on throughout the Midlands

14.00 Report back with discussion from participatory workshop 2nd May on the questions:

What is going on already in the Midlands?

What don’t we know?

What are the specific food security issues for the Midlands?

What policy needs to change?

What action needs to change?

15.00 Keynote speaker Prof Elizabeth Dowler: Why are we still having to research household food insecurity?

16.00 close

The event was generously supported by Warwick Food GRP and was run at no charge to participants.:

Report of the food poverty workshop

The workshop held on 2nd May 2019 at the University of Warwick was the first in what we hope is a series of workshops where experts by experience, front line food poverty workers and campaigners and academic researchers can work together to identify the knowledge gaps specifically in the Midlands region. A follow-up meeting will take place on 20th June where we will present the findings of this workshop to a broad range of policymakers, investigators and activists working in the region in order to work together toward identifying evidence-based solutions.

Report of the food poverty workshop held at the University of Warwick 02 May 2019

Minimum food equipment for food security

Lack of access to food cooking and storage facilities can push vulnerable households into food insecurity. The obligation to buy ready-to-eat foods, which are typically more expensive than ingredients, can strain some household budgets to the point that they cut down on the amount or quality of food that they eat. Lack of food storage, or insecure storage such as facilities shared with other households, often occur in temporary housing situations, such as bed-and-breakfast accommodation. We investigated the minimum food storage and equipment needed to produce healthy family meals. The equipment required depends on the precise cooking methods available. There are some items that are basic requirements and storage needs are common to all cooking types.

Minimum food equipment standard