Please read our student and staff community guidance on COVID-19
Skip to main content Skip to navigation

Italian and Linguistics (BA) (Full-Time, 2021 Entry)


UCAS Code
R3Q1

Qualification
Bachelor of Arts (BA)

Duration
4 years full-time, including a year abroad

Start Date
27 September 2021

Department of Study
School of Modern Languages

Location of Study
University of Warwick


By combining Italian with Linguistics you’ll explore the social contexts of language, as well as how language is acquired. You’ll learn about cultural differences and intercultural communication in international professional contexts, as well as developing practical analytical skills. Italian may be studied ab initio.


Course overview

By combining Italian with Linguistics you’ll explore the social contexts of language, as well as how language is acquired. You’ll learn about cultural differences and intercultural communication in international professional contexts, and develop your practical analytical skills. This degree will give you an insight into the relationship between language, culture and identity. You’ll also study issues related to language and media, politics and education. You’ll spend your second or third year abroad, consolidating and enhancing your learning.


Course structure

In your first year you will study Italian language at beginner's, intermediate or advanced level, building up skills in written and spoken Italian. You will also take modules focusing on modern Italian political history or the development of literary and cinematic expression from the Renaissance to the present. Your year abroad will be spent studying at an Italian university alongside Italian students and immersing yourself in Italian.

Throughout your degree you will continue your study of Italian language. You will also choose from a broad variety of literary, historical, and cultural modules, taught by leading experts.

On the Italian and Linguistics course you will study 50% Italian and 50% Linguistics. After beginning the course, you may be able to transfer to Italian with Linguistics, which would enable you to study 75% Italian and 25% Linguistics.


How will I learn?

We employ a variety of teaching approaches, including lectures, seminars (in which the emphasis is on student participation) and written and spoken language classes. You will spend the rest of your time studying independently, preparing for classes, reading and analysing materials set for study, engaging with secondary sources, writing essays and working on your language skills.


Class sizes

Seminars approx 15; oral classes 8-10.


Contact hours

Around 10-12 hours of teaching per week.


How will I be assessed?

We will track your progress through language assignments, essays, presentations, portfolio submissions and examinations (written and oral). Throughout your course you will receive detailed, personalised feedback to help you to improve your skills.

The final degree classification is determined by your intermediate- and final-year marks; each of these years contributes 50%.


Your year abroad

You will spend your year abroad doing one of three things:

  • Working as a language assistant teaching English in a primary or secondary school
  • Studying full-time at a partner university in Italy
  • On a work placement

Most students going to Italy opt for an exchange at a partner university. Some are successful in obtaining a (highly competitive) language assistantship. Most students apply through the British Council's English Language Assistant scheme during the first term of their second year at Warwick.

The year abroad options are flexible so we recommend you check the department's subject pages for more details.

General entry requirements

A level:

  • AAB to include a modern or classical language

IB:

  • 36 to include 5 at Higher Level in a modern or classical language

BTEC:

  • We welcome applications from students taking BTECs alongside an A level in a modern or classical language

Additional requirements:

You will also need to meet our English Language requirements.


International Students

We welcome applications from students with other internationally recognised qualifications.

Find out more about international entry requirements.


Contextual data and differential offers

Warwick may make differential offers to students in a number of circumstances. These include students participating in the Realising Opportunities programme, or who meet two of the contextual data criteria. Differential offers will be one or two grades below Warwick’s standard offer (to a minimum of BBB).


Warwick International Foundation Programme (IFP)

All students who successfully complete the Warwick IFP and apply to Warwick through UCAS will receive a guaranteed conditional offer for a related undergraduate programme (selected courses only).

Find out more about standard offers and conditions for the IFP.


Taking a gap year

Applications for deferred entry welcomed.


Interviews

We do not typically interview applicants. Offers are made based on your UCAS form which includes predicted and actual grades, your personal statement and school reference.

Year One


Modern Italian Language for Beginners

Would you like the challenge of learning a new language at university? This foundation module for absolute beginners combines the acquisition of core language skills with knowledge of broader aspects of Italian culture, equipping you with the tools to engage with a wide range of relevant, contemporary topics in Italian. Opportunities to practise your Italian vary from role play to quizzes, working both individually and in your group. Successful completion will mean you are able to hold a conversation in Italian, read newspapers and get the gist of TV and radio programmes in Italian.

OR

Modern Italian Language 1 (Intermediate)

Do you need to consolidate and expand your competence in Italian while enjoying talking about culture and society? If so, this is the module for you. You’ll be given opportunities to revise fundamental grammar and vocabulary before acquiring more complex grammatical constructions, including through translation. We will integrate cultural topics with your linguistic studies, so you have the chance to explore areas such as tourism, the arts, the environment and Italian traditions. You will have opportunities for individual and group presentations and to engage in activities that integrate the skills of listening, reading, writing and speaking. By the end of your course, you’ll be expected to be able to write competently in several registers, using appropriate styles and terminology, and to converse in Italian to a good standard.

OR

Modern Italian Language 1 (Advanced)

Would you like to use your Italian A level (or equivalent) language skills creatively? This module will develop your linguistic and intercultural competence in Italian by means of advanced activities, including creative writing, translation, debates, presentations and drama. You will explore linguistic structures using resources in a variety of media and engage with authentic and sophisticated texts to compare cultural systems and express your opinion critically and creatively. In translation, you will experiment with different genres, registers and styles to enhance your cultural appreciation of Italian. Finally, you will have opportunities to explore cultural subjects and lead group discussions.


An Italian cultural module
The History of Modern Italy

You will chart the course of cultural, political and social change in Italy over the 20th century, studying key moments in its history, including the rise of fascism, the economic boom of the mid-20th century, and political extremism of the 1970s, through to contemporary issues such as immigration and recent economic and political crises. You will study these events through the lens of literary and cinematic works and gain an understanding of how they have contributed to the nature and identity of contemporary Italy, in order to prepare you for your year abroad. You will also build your competence in textual analysis, independent research and essay-writing.

OR

Introduction to Italian Culture

How should we ‘read’ a literary or visual text? What are the considerations of form, audience and context that enable us to make sense of a cultural product? In what ways should a performance be understood differently from something fixed on the page? You will address these questions by considering four representative avenues of expression in Italian culture, namely cinema, short stories, lyric poetry and theatre-writing. You will refine your skills of analysis and have the opportunity to sample different periods of Italian culture, from the Renaissance through to intellectuals such as Italo Calvino, Primo Levi, and the poet Giacomo Leopardi, representative of the Romantic tradition. You will end your course equipped with the appropriate technical vocabulary to discuss different art forms fluently and in an informed manner.


Linguistics modules:
Linguistics: Understanding Language

What is language? What is it made of? What rules do we follow when we put sounds together to create words and when we combine words to create sentences? How many languages are spoken in the world today, and in which ways are they similar or different? These are some of the questions that you will explore on this module. Using examples from different languages, you will analyse real-life language data in order to develop the practical skills required for linguistic analysis.

Language in Society

In this module, you will learn to unpack the ways in which language shapes and is shaped by society. You will analyse critically how language operates in different linguistic and cultural settings, using a range of theoretical concepts, empirical research and methodologies to understand, describe and interpret language use in society. This includes an investigative study of language use, during which you will also develop your communication and study skills.

Research, Academic and Professional Skills

Providing a foundation for modules ET214 and ET215, this module will help you develop the research, academic and professional skills needed to succeed at university and beyond. You will explore research, data-collection and analytical methodologies, using real-life examples of language, culture and communication. You will develop an analytical toolkit to serve you in multiple contexts, including your future career. You will also become familiar with research conventions, including ethical approval, literature review, communication and critical understanding of academic writing.

Intermediate Year^

Modern Italian Language 2

This module will extend and refine your competence in Italian. With an emphasis on the key skills of reading, listening, speaking and writing, you will consolidate your proficiency in both new and familiar grammatical and linguistic structures, and expand the range and sophistication of your vocabulary and use of register in spoken and written discourse. In addition to classroom exercises, advanced discursive written work and oral projects, you will also be directed to appropriate activities for self-study.

OR

Modern Italian Language 3

On this module, you will develop your translation, writing and oral communication skills to advanced level. You will engage in translation as a practical skill, working to produce translations of literary, journalistic and academic texts with a focus on conveying nuances of meaning and culturally specific terms. You will develop greater fluency in different writing styles and genres. Oral sessions will increase your familiarity with more sophisticated registers of spoken Italian and raise your awareness of recent developments in Italian society so that you can discuss aspects of contemporary Italy in relation to your personal experiences.


Linguistics modules:
Linguistics: Structure, Sound and Meaning

This module provides you with intensive instruction in six core domains of linguistics: phonetics, phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics and pragmatics. You will expand substantially on concepts that were introduced to you during Linguistics: Understanding Language. You will work from a wide range of language data to develop your knowledge of findings, theories, and methodologies from these domains. You will build core disciplinary knowledge that is essential to any field of linguistics inquiry, and establish a necessary foundation for advanced linguistic research.

Sociolinguistics

Why do we speak differently in different situations? Can you identify the features of a Geordie and a Scouse accent? Do men and women speak differently, and if so, why? These are questions you will explore as we examine the relationship between language use and social context. Building on module ET119 (Language in Society), you will develop a greater understanding of linguistic variation. With the opportunity to conduct your own research study, you can expect to complete your course armed with a set of theories, insights and skills to enable you to address such questions, and to explore your own questions about the role of language in society.

Final Year

Modern Italian Language 4

Building on Intermediate year language, you will deepen your writing, speaking and translation skills, paying particular attention to register and style and learning some of the underpinning translation theory. We approach translation not just as a linguistic exercise but as a practical skill, so you will work to produce translations of literary, journalistic and academic texts, and explore techniques for conveying semantic nuances, culturally specific terms and more sophisticated registers of spoken Italian. Both the writing and oral components of the course will raise your awareness of recent developments in Italian society and enable you to discuss relevant aspects of contemporary Italy in relation to your personal experience.

Linguistics module:
Communication Modes

In this module, you will learn how the sounds, gestures and facial expressions we make combine with linguistic choices to give meaning to our messages and influence our interpretation of the messages of others. You will develop a deeper awareness of the impact of different modes of communication and increase your understanding of the research and analysis that underpin our knowledge of human communication in all its complexity.


Examples of optional modules/options for current students:

^Year Two or Three depending on when the year abroad is taken

Tuition fees

Find out more about fees and funding.


Additional course costs

There may be costs associated with other items or services such as academic texts, course notes, and trips associated with your course. Students who choose to complete a work placement or study abroad will pay reduced tuition fees for their third year.

Your career

This degree course was only recently introduced, so our first cohort of students have not yet graduated.

However, graduates from other Modern Language courses like this one have gone on to work for employers including:

  • Amazon
  • British Airways
  • Civil Service
  • Grayce Consulting
  • HM Revenue and Customs
  • HSBC
  • Ipsos Mori
  • Lidl
  • NBC Universal
  • Save the Children International
  • The Department for International Trade

They have pursued careers such as:

  • Business and financial project management professionals
  • Chartered and certified accountants
  • Financial accounts managers
  • Human resources and industrial relations officers
  • Management consultants and business analysts
  • Public services associate professionals
  • Teachers and other educational professionals

Helping you find the right career

Our department has a dedicated professionally qualified Senior Careers Consultant to support you. They offer impartial advice and guidance, together with workshops and events throughout the year. Previous examples of workshops and events include:

  • What are you doing after Warwick? Career planning for final year language students
  • Careers in the Public Sector
  • Warwick careers fairs throughout the year
  • Completing effective CVs and Application Forms for students from the School of Modern Languages
  • Reflecting on Your Year Abroad
  • Languages Alumni Evening

Find out more about careers support at Warwick.

Isabella, current student

"Friendly and easy to talk to"

"The department is incredible, they’re always on hand to help me whether it was with my year abroad queries or just general language-related issues. The best thing about them is that they’re really friendly and easy to talk to."

Isabella

BA Modern Languages


"My favourite module that I've studies so far is one called Transnational Stories in Italy ... It focuses on Italy in the present day - also what does it really mean to be Italian these days - viewed through the lens of contemporary literature."

Cory

Italian Studies BA

Why did you choose to study languages at Warwick?

"I started quite early on with Italian, it was something that I'd carried on through my school life, and something that I just wanted to pursue my interest in, and Warwick offered the choice for me to pursue that at degree level."

How did you find the transition from A level to University?

"The transition from a level to degree level for me wasn't such a big jump because I did have such, such a solid foundation of base of knowledge. And when you do come in to study in a language degree level, the first year is based on ability, so the classes are split from beginner level, intermediate to an advanced level, so you’re never put in to a point where you feel you're out of your depth."

What has been your favourite module so far?

"My favourite model that I've studied so far is one called 'Trans National Stories in Italy'. It was, sort of, fits again with my biases about what I was interested in, sort of in contemporary history rather than a sort of very deep, deep historical perspective that sort of focuses on Italy and the present day. Also, what does it really mean to be Italian these days, viewed through a lens of contemporary literature."

Why study cultural modules whilst learning a language?

"They're not really distinct really in my mind, and I've think in Warwick’s mind as well, because when you learn the language, of course, you can just learn the verb endings the grammar, but when you learn a culture of a language as well, it helps, it helps you with sort of intricate details that you wouldn't already be aware of."

What modules can you choose?

"At Warwick there is such a wealth of different options available, which does sort of allow you to sort of pursue your own interests as well. Obviously, when you're in your first year, there is a required sort of base level of knowledge. So there will be some compulsory modules, but you're more than allowed to indulge your own interests."

Where did you go for your year abroad?

"So for my year abroad, I went to Pisa in western Tuscany, sort of where the Tower is, that’s how I always describe it to people, but there was so much more there for me because Warwick has so many links with many different universities in Italy. There was there was a choice of at least about 20 universities, I think it was, when we came to choose our destinations and there's so much information available about them all, you get to speak to students who've been away previously and that was how it was it was actually sold to me initially."

What are your plans after University?

"So after university, I've sort of been I've been interested in quite a few different industries. I've got some work experience in finance coming up soon. I've been applying for things that marketing internships and grad schemes because their language degree that they're fairly in demand just because of the transferability of the skills that you gain on them."

What advice would you give to someone looking at studying languages?

"Learning the language is such a, it's such a valuable experience, It's because everybody says, “I wish I could speak a language”, but if you do a language, you can, indeed you gain, you gain so much world experience; you get to live abroad, you get to indulge yourself in a lot of cultural experiences that you wouldn't normally do. There are so you can so many strings to your bow that you can have, having studied a language - just life-skills wise, as well as language-skills wise."

This information is applicable for 2021 entry. Given the interval between the publication of courses and enrolment, some of the information may change. It is important to check our website before you apply. Please read our terms and conditions to find out more.