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I Am Waiting For You to Come Back: Family Wartime Diaries (Čekám až se vrátíš. Rodinné deníky z války)

Čekám, až se vrátíš
I Am Waiting For You to Come Back: Family Wartime Diaries (Čekám až se vrátíš. Rodinné deníky z války) is a new book edited by Dr Anna Hájková.

In the six months he spent in hiding in Prague prior to his arrest in August 1944, the Jewish Communist resistance fighter, Jany Lebovič, kept a diary. Jany was deported to Auschwitz and shot upon arrival. At the time of Jany’s arrest, the Nazis deported the mother of Jany’s friend, Pavla Hájková, for supporting this resistance group. Pavla was liberated from a Ravensbrück satellite camp, and throughout the months following her liberation, Pavla kept a diary testifying to her difficult return trip through a destroyed Germany to Prague, her new beginning in Prague, and her slow realization that her husband would never return. For Jany and Pavla, diary-writing represented a means of communicating with their beloved partners, from whom they were separated by the Nazis. These unique documents speak about the Holocaust, concentration camps, Communist resistance, and love in wartime. This edition of these two family diaries is accompanied by the editor’s historical introduction and critical commentary, memories of Pavla’s and Jany’s relatives, and photographs from family archives.

Details of all the monographs and edited collection of the Warwick University History Department's current academic staff are available online, and the details of all the monographs and edited collection of the Warwick University History Department's emeritus academic staff are also available online.

 

Fri 30 November 2018, 15:15 | Tags: Publication

Leverhulme Early Career Fellowships 2019

The Leverhulme TrustThe Faculty of Arts at the University of Warwick (https://warwick.ac.uk/fac/arts/) encourages outstanding postdoctoral scholars to apply to The Leverhulme Trust’s Early Career Fellowships scheme, for Fellowships hosted at Warwick starting in the 2019/20 academic year. The Fellowship, which lasts for three years, contributes 50% of the Fellow’s salary, with the balance being paid by the University. The expectation is that Fellows should undertake a significant piece of publishable work during the funded period. Appointments at the University of Warwick are dependent on the award of the Fellowship.

The Faculty of Arts is one of the world’s top 50 Arts and Humanities faculties and is home to a thriving research culture spread across eight Departments and Schools and two independent Research Centres. These are Classics and Ancient History; English and Comparative Literary Studies; Film and Television Studies; History; History of Art; the School of Modern Languages and Cultures; the School of Theatre & Performance Studies and Cultural & Media Policy Studies; the School for Cross-Faculty Studies; the Yesu Persaud Centre for Caribbean Studies; and the Centre for the Study of the Renaissance. Further information about the Faculty’s research can be found here: https://warwick.ac.uk/fac/arts/research/.

The Faculty will run an internal selection process to identify the candidates that it wishes to put forward. To be considered for this, prospective applicants must submit an Expression of Interest containing the following information to James Green, Research Strategy and Development Manager for the Faculty of Arts (James.Green@warwick.ac.uk) by 5pm on Friday 11th January 2019:

  • A short description of their proposed project (maximum 2 A4 pages);
  • A copy of their CV (maximum 2 A4 pages);
  • A one-page outline of an undergraduate second-year module, based on their field of research, that could be taught in the second year of the Fellowship;
  • The name of an academic in their proposed host Department at the University of Warwick who would be willing to endorse their application. Candidates should approach this member of staff to discuss the project at the earliest opportunity, and in advance of submitting the Expression of Interest;
  • The name of three referees.

All candidates must consult the Leverhulme Trust’s guidance (https://www.leverhulme.ac.uk/early-career-fellowships) prior to submitting an Expression of Interest, and in particular must carefully check the eligibility criteria.

Following the internal selection process, the University will be able to support successful candidates in the development of full applications through our Research and Impact Services team. The deadline for submission of the full application is 28th February 2019. For more information about this and for any other enquiries about the scheme, please contact James Green on the above email address.

 

Mon 19 November 2018, 12:39 | Tags: Postdoctoral Recruitment Funding

"Le Grand Kilo" - expert comment by Dr James Poskett

James Poskett 
Dr James Poskett, Assistant Professor in the History of Science and Technology at the Warwick University History Department, offers an expert comment on the vote at the International Bureau of Weights and Measures to decide whether the kilogramme should cease to be benchmarked against "Le Grand Kilo," a physical object stored under three bell jars in a French vault.

For the full expert comment, please see https://warwick.ac.uk/newsandevents/expertcomment/le_grand_kilo.

 

Sat 17 November 2018, 08:26 | Tags: Expert Comment

Royal Asiatic Society of Great Britain and Ireland - Inaugural Bayly Prize

Royal Asiatic Society LogoOn Tuesday 30th October the Royal Asiatic Society of Great Britain and Ireland celebrated the life and work of the late Professor Sir Christopher Bayly FBA, with the award of the inaugural Bayly Prize and the posthumous launch of Sir Christopher’s book, Remaking the Modern World 1900-2015: Global Connections and Comparisons.

The Bayly Prize is for an outstanding doctoral thesis on an Asian topic completed at a British university in the year prior to the award. In this inaugural year the prize was presented to Dr Johannes Lotze for his thesis, Translation of Empire: Mongol Legacy, Language Policy, and the Early Ming World Order, 1368-1453. The shortlist of five for the prize included Dr Kyle Jackson, former PhD student at the University of Warwick History Department, and Dr Callie Wilkinson, former PhD student at the University of Cambridge and now Leverhulme Early Career Fellow at the University of Warwick History Department.

Kyle Jackson (University of Warwick) for Colonial Conquest and Religious Entanglement: A Mizo History from Northeast India (c. 1890-1920). The judges said: “This high-quality piece of historical research draws on indigenous language sources and deploys indigenous terminology to re-centre the history of North-eastern India. Dr Jackson has an eye for a good story, and the thesis is written in elegant and fluid prose, making it a pleasure to read.”

Callie Wilkinson (University of Cambridge) for The Residents of the British East India Company at Indian Royal Courts, c. 1798-1818. The judges said: “This work is distinctive because it refreshes the study of Residents and indirect rule in India by applying new historical methods to the subject. Dr Wilkinson provides us with a rich and nuanced picture of East India Company rule in the subcontinent that moves us away from the main centres of EIC power and beyond traditional subjects of historical study.​”

For more details, please see the Royal Asiatic Society of Great Britain and Ireland announcement.
 

Sun 04 November 2018, 15:55 | Tags: Award, Postgraduate

The Caribbean: A Brief History

The Caribbean Brief Histories 3 
The Caribbean: A Brief History
by Emeritus Professor Gad Heuman has been republished as a Third Edition by Bloomsbury.

In this new edition of his crucial introduction to Caribbean history, Gad Heuman provides a comprehensive overview of the region's history, from its earliest inhabitants to contemporary political and cultural developments. Topics covered include: - The Amerindians - Sugary and Slavery - Race, Racism and Equality - The Aftermath of Emancipation - The Revolutionary Caribbean - Cultures of the Caribbean This third edition has been updated to reflect the latest developments in the literature, and takes into account important recent events including the rapprochement between the U.S. and Cuba, the ongoing problem of climate change and the threat of the Zika virus. The companion website, which includes chapter questions, primary documents, a timeline and link to relevant websites, has also been updated with new material. The book considers not only of the political and social struggles that have shaped the Caribbean, but also provides a sense of the development of the region's culture. The Caribbean: A Brief History is ideal for all students seeking a clear and readable introduction to Caribbean history.

Details of all the monographs and edited collection of the Warwick University History Department's current academic staff are available online, and the details of all the monographs and edited collection of the Warwick University History Department's emeritus academic staff are also available online.
 

Sat 03 November 2018, 13:33 | Tags: Publication Emeritus Staff

The Nonviolent Struggle for Indian Freedom, 1905-19

The Nonviolent Struggle for Indian Freedom 
The Nonviolent Struggle for Indian Freedom, 1905-19 is a new book by Emeritus Professor David Hardiman.

Much of the recent surge in writing about the practice of nonviolent forms of resistance has focused on movements that occurred after the end of the Second World War, many of which have been extremely successful. Although the fact that such a method of resistance was developed in its modern form by Indians is acknowledged in this writing, there has not until now been an authoritative history of the role of Indians in the evolution of the phenomenon. Celebrated historian David Hardiman shows that while nonviolence is associated above all with the towering figure of Mahatma Gandhi, ‘passive resistance’ was already being practised by nationalists in British-ruled India, though there was no principled commitment to nonviolence as such. It was Gandhi, first in South Africa and then in India, who evolved a technique that he called ‘satyagraha’. His endeavours saw ‘nonviolence’ forged as both a new word in the English language, and a new political concept. This book conveys in vivid detail exactly what nonviolence entailed, and the formidable difficulties that the pioneers of such resistance encountered in the years 1905-19.

Details of all the monographs and edited collection of the Warwick University History Department's current academic staff are available online, and the details of all the monographs and edited collection of the Warwick University History Department's emeritus academic staff are also available online.

 

Sat 03 November 2018, 12:14 | Tags: Publication Emeritus Staff

Recruitment: Research Fellow for the project "What’s at Stake in the Fake? Indian Pharmaceuticals, African Markets and Global Health"

The Department of History seeks to appoint a full-time Research Fellow for the fixed-term period of twelve months, starting in early 2019, to conduct research as part of the Wellcome Trust funded project, What’s at Stake in the Fake? Indian Pharmaceuticals, African Markets and Global Health, under the direction of Dr Sarah Hodges.

You will have a first degree or equivalent, a PhD in history or a related field, and experience of conducting archival research. Preference may be given to candidates with familiarity with WHO archives or experience in the anthropology of pharmaceuticals.

All applications must be accompanied by a CV and covering letter. Please see the full advert and job description for more details, including how to apply. Please direct all informal inquiries to the project PI, Dr Sarah Hodges, at S.Hodges@warwick.ac.uk.

Closing Date for Applications: 15th November 2018
Provisional Interview Date: 26th November 2018

 

Thu 25 October 2018, 12:39 | Tags: Postdoctoral, Research, Recruitment

Child Protection in England, 1960-2000: Expertise, Experience, and Emotion

Child Protection in England 1960-2000
Child Protection in England, 1960-2000: Expertise, Experience, and Emotion is a new book by Dr Jennifer Crane, Research Fellow for the Wellcome Trust Senior Investigator Award "The Cultural History of the NHS" at the Warwick University History Department.

This book explores how children, parents, and survivors reshaped the politics of child protection in late twentieth-century England. Activism by these groups, often manifested in small voluntary organisations, drew upon and constructed an expertise grounded in experience and emotion that supported, challenged, and subverted medical, social work, legal, and political authority. New forms of experiential and emotional expertise were manifested in politics - through consultation, voting, and lobbying - but also in the reshaping of everyday life, and in new partnerships formed between voluntary spokespeople and media. While becoming subjects of, and agents in, child protection politics over the late twentieth century, children, parents, and survivors also faced barriers to enacting change, and the book traces how long-standing structural hierarchies, particularly around gender and age, mediated and inhibited the realisation of experiential and emotional expertise.

 

Tue 23 October 2018, 12:14 | Tags: Postdoctoral Announcement Publication

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