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Illustrative Bibliography

  • Reading list link from library: http://readinglists.warwick.ac.uk/lists/77C91CA0-2449-46C7-01CA-035AD7AE2645.html
  • American Historical Review, December 1988-- perspectives on historical film by Rosenstone and White.
  • Roland Barthes, "The Face of Garbo" in Mythologies (1957) and "The Discourse of History," translated by Stephen Bann. Comparative Criticism, 3 (1981): 7-20 (online).
  • Bela Balazs, The Theory of Film (2015 or any edition-- see on close-up)
  • Carl Becker. Everyman His Own Historian. New York: F. S. Crofts & Co., 1935 (on relativism and popular history)
  • Birgit Beumers and Nancy Condee, The Cinema of Alexander Sokurov. I.B. Taurus, 2011.
  • Dennis Bingham. Whose Lives Are They Anyway? Rutgers University Press, 2011. (fairly recent study of biopics which sharply divides discourses for men's and women's lives in Hollywood)
  • Peter Bondanella, A History of Italian Cinema. Continuum, 2009.
  • David Bordwell et al. The Classical Hollywood Cinema: Film Style and Mode of Production to 1960. New York: Columbia University Press, 1985. (inescapable classicism and the formulas of Hollywood-- some useful information on editing and cinematography)
  • Kevin Brownlow, Abel Gance's Napoleon. Jonathan Cape, 1983.
  • Suzanne Clark. Cold Warriors. University of Southern Illiois Press, 2003. (Cold War discourse and connections to fascist aesthetics-- applicable to postwar US and European westerns)
  • John Caughie, Theories of Authorship. Routledge, 1981.
  • Jean-Luc Comolli and Jean Narboni, "CInema/Ideology/Criticism," (1969), reprinted in Phil Rosen, Narrative/Apprarus/Ideology (1986). See also Comolli's Cinema Against Spectacle (Chicago, 2009).
  • Angela Dalle Vacche, The Visual Turn: Classical Film Theory and Art History. Rutgers University Press, 2002. (on the close-up)
  • Cecil B. DeMille. The Autobiography of Cecil B. DeMille. (1959, reprinted 2012).
  • Julie Des Jardins. Women and the Historical Profession in America. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 2003. (notes prominence of women in early feminist and ethnic historiography from 1870s onwards)
  • Vera Dika. Recycled Culture in Contemporary Art & Film. Berkeley: University of California Press, 2003. (nostalgia and postmodernim)
  • Elsaesser, Thomas. Fassbinder’s Germany: History Identity Subject. Amsterdam University Press, 1996. (essential study of F's war trilogy)
  • Marc Ferro. Cinema and History. Detroit: Wayne State University Press, 1988. (what Europe can do and Hollywood can't in the construction and narration of history on screen)
  • Jean-Luc Godard. Interviews. Ed. David Sterritt. University Press of Mississippi, 2010.
  • D.W. Griffith. The Rise and Fall of Free Speech in America (1916, reprinted online).
  • Leger Grindon. Shadows on the Past: Studies in the Historical Fiction Film. Temple University Press, 1994. (some comments on Visconti)
  • Tom Gunning. D.W. Griffith and the Origins of American Narrative Filmmaking, 1999 (useful for seminar on Intolerance but see also his seminal essay on the cinema of attractions)
  • Renate Hehr, Margarethe von Trotta: Filmmaking as Liberation. Axel Menges, 2002.
  • Dina Iordanova, The Cinema of Flames: Balkan Cinema. BFI, 2001
  • Fredric Jameson. Signatures of the Visible. London: Routledge, 1990. (on The Shining, but you must also read Postmodernism and Consumer Society)
  • Alan Kerner, Film and the Holocaust. Continuum, 2011 (mix of documentary and 'fiction')
  • Kerwin Klein. Frontiers of the Historical Imagination. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1997. (overview of Western historiography one can read alongside Buscombe)
  • Julia Kristeva, New Maladies of the Soul (1995) (read essay on "Woman's Time" as well as the work of Kelly Oliver on unworking the double-bind)
  • Amy Lawrence, Echo and Narcissus: Women's Voices in Classical Hollywood Cinema. University of California Press, 1991. (not a fan, but it will give you some coverage of voiceovers)
  • Gabriel Miller, The Films of Martin Ritt: Fanfare for the Common Man. University Press of Mississippi, 2014. (on Molly Maguires and Norma Rae)
  • Marcia Landy, ed. The Historical Film. Rutgers University Press, 2001 (useful essay by Miriam Hanson on Shoah and Schindler's List). Landy's recent Cinema and Counter History (2015) is a bit repetitive but has some interesting theories about the development of critique and affect within globalhistorical filmmaking)
  • Peter Novick, That Noble Dream: The ‘Objectivity Question’ and the American Historical Profession. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1988 (US historiographic trends to read in conjunction with studies of historical subjects coming out of Hollywood-- interesting that Hollywood's interest in ethnic and women's history predates academic interventions)
  • Griselda Pollock and M. Silverman (Concentrationary Cinema. Berghahn, 2011. (for Night & Fog and Kapo)
  • Nicholas Pronay, ed. Politics, Propaganda, and Film (Palgrave, 1982). (See Pronay's seminal essay on the political censorship of films in Britain between the two world wars, 98-125.)
  • Rebecca Prime, Hollywood Exiles in Europe. Rutgers University Press, 2014. (on the noir disapora)
  • Jeffrey Richards. Films and British National Identity. Manchester University Press, 1997. (see for material on the Empire genre)
  • Donald Ritchie, Rashomon. Rutgers University Press, 1986. (documents and essays)
  • Bruno Ramirez, Inside the Historical Film. McGill University Press, 2014.
  • Philip Rosen. Change Mummified. Minnesota, 2001.
  • Robert A. Rosenstone. Visions of the Past: The Challenge of Film to Our Idea of History. Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 1995. (solid general overview and see also the more recent History on Film/Film on History, 2012)
  • Robert A. Rosenstone and Constantin Parvelescu, eds. The Companion to the Historical Film. Blackwells, 2013. (useful series of essays on various aspects of global historical filmmaking).
  • Tassilo Scneider, "Finding a New Heimat in the Wild West," Journal of Film and Video, 47: 1 (1995): 50-66.
  • Paul Schrader, "Notes on Film Noir," Film Comment, Spring 1972: 8-13. (the contexts: basic and readable)
  • Sklar, Robert and Charles Musser, eds (1997). Resistant Images. Temple University Press. (any of these essays will help, but the ones on Chaplin and Visconti are most relevant for this year's work)
  • J.E. Smyth, Fred Zinnemann and the Cinema of Resistance. University Press of Mississippi. (some material on film historiography of the Resistance)
  • Vivian Sobchack, "Surge and Splendor: A Phenomenology of the Hollywood Historical Epic," Representations, Vol. 29, Winter, 1990: 24-49.
  • Warren Susman, "Film and History: Artifact and Experience," in Hollywood and the American Historical Film (2012). (useful overview)
  • Charles Tashiro. Pretty Pictures. University of Texas Press, 1998. (production design and historical films)
  • Richard Taylor. The Eisenstein Reader. BFI, 1998. (indispensible)
  • Ginette Vincendeau. Jean-Pierre Melville: An American In Paris. London: BFI, 2003. (for an interpretation of his changing representations of the French resistance from La silence de la mer to Armee des ombres)
  • Hayden White, The Content of the Form (1987) and The Tropics of Discourse (1973)

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