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Introduction

Tutor: Aditya Sarkar (aditya.sarkar@warwick.ac.uk)

This is an introductory meeting to familiarise students with the general outline and requirements of the module. The module will consider both thematic dimensions of global history—gender, economy, globalisation, material culture, and modernity—and the organization and distribution of the world according to socio-geographical units (area studies). To set the stage for discussion in the subsequent weeks, we will begin by delving into various broad-based theories and approaches to the historical study of the globe.

Readings can be accessed via Aspire Reading List

Key Reading:

Maxine Berg, ‘Global History: Approaches and New Directions’, in Writing the History of the Global: Challenges for the Twenty-First Century, ed. Maxine Berg (Oxford University Press, 2013), 1-18.

Jeremy Adelman ‘What is Global History Now?' https://aeon.co/essays/is-global-history-still-possible-or-has-it-had-its-moment

Sebastian Conrad, What Is Global History?, cht.1-4 (pp.1-89)

Additional Readings:

Sebastian Conrad, What is Global History? (Princeton University Press, 2016).

Jan de Vries, 'Reflections on Doing Global History', in Writing the History of the Global: Challenges for the Twenty-First Century, ed. Maxine Berg (Oxford University Press, 2013), 32-47.

Dominic Sachsenmaier, 'Global History and critiques of western perspectives', Comparative Education, vol.42, no.3 (August 2006), 451-470.

Dominic Sachsenmaier, Global Perspectives on Global History. Theories and Approaches in a Connected World (Cambridge University Press, 2011).

Seminar Questions:

1. "Once it is established that global history is everything, everything can become global history. This is less absurd than it seems.' (Sebastian Conrad, p.8). Discuss this statement.

2. What new insights do you think the rise of global history has enabled?

3. Do you agree with Adelman's view that contemporary events have created a crisis for global history?

4. Formulate a sketch of a potential 'global history' project, based on your own historical interests.

5. Do you prefer 'comparative' or 'connective' histories? Discuss their advantages and limits.

6. How successful do you think global history's challenge to 'methodological nationalism' has been?