Skip to main content

Our PhD students

Amy Fitzgibbon (2018-present)
me_for_uni.png
Amy is a first-year PhD German Studies student in School of Modern Languages and Cultures at Warwick. Her PhD research focuses on the representation of transgender lives and the current socio-political climate concerning transgenderism in German and English language audiovisual translations. Her project considers the language and audiovisual techniques, i.e. subtitling and dubbing choices used, in a range of documentaries and films (fictional and non-fictional) produced in Germany, the UK and the US. In doing this, she hopes to gain a comprehensive look into how transgenderism is lexicalised and audiovisually translated in multiple 21st century cultures and to contribute to this young and under-researched area of AVT studies.
Outside of her PhD, her research interests include: LBGTUA+ issues in a global context, Gender Studies, Translation Theory and Practice, gender in 18th century French literature, Shakespeare in translation, and the works of Samuel Beckett.
Previous qualifications:
  • BA Hons French and German, University of Southampton (2011-2015)
  • MA Translation and Transcultural Studies, University of Warwick (2016-2017).
Academic awards include:
  • MA Performance and Pedagogy Bursary, English and Comparative Literature department, Warwick (2016-2017)
  • Doctoral Fellowship, School Modern Languages and Cultures, Warwick (2018-present)
In her spare time, Amy loves travelling the UK and Europe, acting, going to the theatre, swimming and taking her dog for long country walks!

Arianna Autieri (2018-present)
Arianna is a CADRE-funded PhD student in Translation Studies in the Englisarianna_picture.jpgh and Comparative Literary Studies Department, supervised jointly by Dr Chantal Wright and Dr Christina Britzolakis. Arianna is in her 1st year. Her thesis is entitled “James Joyce’s verbal music performed: the translation of language as music in Ulysses
Arianna’s research aims at investigating the musical qualities in certain episodes of James Joyce’s Ulysses, and at verifying and assessing how these different forms of musicality might be reproduced, alongside the multiple meanings of the text, in translation. One of the purposes of her study is to analyse the three available Italian translations of Ulysses to determine how the Italian reader is currently able to perceive the original sound-texture and musical structure of the text, and to eventually suggest different choices to create a musical translation. In her research, she proposes to investigate how Clive Scott’s “experimental translation” principles for poetry translation might be applied to prose, and how they could be useful for “performing” Joyce’s musicality in a TT. In this context, she is mostly interested in the concepts of “translation for the polyglot reader”, “listening” and “overwriting”. Her research interests include: Translation Theory and Practice, experimental translation, James Joyce, Ulysses, Words and Music Studies, Music.
Previous qualifications:
  • PhD in Translation Studies, University of Warwick (2018-present)
  • MA in European and Extra-European Languages and Literatures (English and Translation Studies), Università degli Studi di Milano. (2014-2017)
  • BA in Music Studies (instrument: Classical Guitar), Conservatorio G.Verdi, Milano). (2011-2014)
  • BA in Foreign Languages and Literatures, English and Spanish, Università degli Studi di Milano. (2010-2013)
Teaching:
  • 2017-2018: English Language and Culture teacher at Liceo Classico C.Beccaria, Milan.
  • 2017: Music teacher at Istituto Comprensivo Statale "Via Maffucci", Milan.
Awards and memberships:
  • CADRE Scholarship (2018-2021)
  • 2019 Giorgio Melchiori Grant – James Joyce Italian Foundation

  • The James Joyce Italian Foundation member
  • International James Joyce Foundation member

Di Zhao (2017-present)di_zhao_picture.jpg
Di is a second-year PhD Translation Studies student at Warwick. Her PhD research is about the translation of Chinese literary dialects. She is also interested in translating Chinese classical poetry and creative translation experiments.
Previous qualifications:
  • BA Translation and Interpreting, Shandong University (2012-2016)
  • MA Translation and Transcultural Studies, University of Warwick (2016-2017).

Lúcia Collischonn (2018-present) lucia picture
Lúcia is a Brazilian-German translator and first-year PhD student in Translation Studies within the department of English and Comparative Literary Studies. She takes special academic and professional interest in Exophony in creative writing and translation, that is, writing literature in a foreign language and translation into and out of one’s mother tongue. Exophony was the theme of both her Master’s dissertation and her current PhD research, entitled With Apologies to My Mother Tongue: L2 Translation as an exophonic practice. She has special interest in the works of Yoko Tawada, having recently translated two texts by the author, the novel Etüden im Schnee (2016) which is set to be published in Brazil in 2019, and Yoko Tawada Does Not Exist. Research interests include: translation theory and practice, literary theory, contemporary and world literature, Portuguese-language literatures, German-language literatures, transnational literature and adaptation studies.
Previous Qualifications:
  • B.A. English and Portuguese - Translation, Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul UFRGS (2009-2014)
  • M.A. Comparative Literature, Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul UFRGS (2015-2017)
Academic awards include:
  • Postgraduate Bursary - Coordination for the Improvement of Higher Education Personnel (CAPES) Brazil (2016-17)
  • Chancellor’s International Scholarship - University of Warwick (2018-present)
In her spare time, Lúcia loves learning languages, playing music, creative writing and swimming, among a million other things.

Melissa Pawelski (2017-present) melissa picture

I have joined the University of Warwick in October 2017 as a PhD student and my project is supervised by Dr Oliver Davis (French Studies) and Professor Stuart Elden (PAIS). I am based in the School of Modern Languages and Cultures and my research is generously supported by CADRE.

My thesis considers the English and German translations of Michel Foucault’s Surveiller et punir. Naissance de la prison (Paris: Gallimard, 1975):
Discipline and Punish. The Birth of the Prison, translated by Alan Sheridan (London: Penguin, 1991 [1977])
Überwachen und Strafen. Die Geburt des Gefängnisses, translated by Walter Seitter (Frankfurt/Main: Suhrkamp, 1977)

I am particularly interested in the translation of concepts and ideas, such as pouvoir, puissance, supplice, dispositif and assujettissement. I have also started to explore Michel Foucault’s writing style and use of rhetoric, including metaphors and irony. The aim of this project is to make a contribution to the emerging disciplinary association of Translation Studies, Philosophy and Theory that recognises philosophical and theoretical texts as particularly challenging for translation.

I have been fortunate to receive funding from the Humanities Research Centre (HRC) at Warwick in the form of a Doctoral Fellowship to organise a one-day interdisciplinary conference on Saturday, 11th May 2019. My research interests include: Translation of Philosophy and Theory, Michel Foucault, Philosophy of Geography, Reception and influence of philosophy and social theory in the social sciences.

Previous qualifications:
  • BA (Lyon), 2015
  • Msc by Research (Swansea), 2017
Teaching:
  • 2018-19 Term 1 Seminar tutor for FR121 Story of Modern France, Mondays 2-3pm
Administrative Roles:
  • 2018-19 SSLC Chair for SMLC
  • 2017-18 SSLC Course Rep French Studies for SMLC

Shengchi Hsu shengchi picture
I came from Taiwan to the United Kingdom in 2002 for my MA in English. Following that, I has been working full-time for over 10 years in the Further Education sector, teaching ESOL (English to Speakers of Other Languages) and Teacher Education. My interests in cultures, languages and literature eventually brought me back to education to pursue a PhD in Translation Studies.
My PhD project centres around the gender and sexuality aspects of Chinese-English literary translation. Taking Howard Goldblatt’s translations of select novels from Taiwan in 1980s and 1990s as case studies, my project aims to investigate what happens to gender and sexuality in his translating process.

Zeena Faulk zeena picture
Zeena's postgraduate-level work with Dr Chantal Wright challenges the notion of cultural nontransferability of satire by focusing on the political satire of post-2003 Iraq. Iraq experienced an explosion of political satire following the 2003 invasion and occupation by western powers, a flowering that presents particular challenges for translation due to its heavy reliance on cultural background and fleeting political context. Using reader response theory, Zeena's work intends to show that it is possible to go around such limitations in creative ways, rendering this satirical and critical response to war understandable to those with limited knowledge of Arabic and Middle Eastern culture and history.
Publications:
Zeena is currently translating into English a novel by the Chicago-based Iraqi novelist Mahmoud Saeed about a family reacting to events between the end of the Iran-Iraq War and the toppling of the Iraqi regime in 2003. This translation presents similar challenges to a translator in that incorporates extra-textual knowledge about Iraqi events between 1988 and 2003.
Teaching:
  • Modern Standard Arabic, Kent State University, United States. Earned an M.A. in Arabic Translation in 2016.
Professional Career:
  • Managing editor and translator for the top-ranked American healthcare providers, Cleveland Clinic and Mayo Clinic. She managed a team of translators tasked with translating medical content, both internal and web-based, into Arabic for the clinics' global partners and domestic Arabic-speaking patients.