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View the latest news from departments within the Faculty of Science, Engineering and Medicine below.

Computer Science News

Warwick and Alan Turing Institute partnership brings Data Science for Social Good Fellowship to the UK this summer

DSSG Fellows

This year's Data Science for Social Good (DSSG) Fellowship programme is being held in the UK for the first time. The University of Warwick is hosting the Fellowships this summer in conjunction with the Alan Turing Institute. The 2019 programme is running from June 10 to August 28.

The Fellowship is a project-based training programme to supply data scientists with skills to create data-driven solutions to real-world problems. It trains aspiring data scientists to work on data mining, machine learning, big data and data science projects with social impact.

It was first pioneered by the University of Chicago, and since 2013 has seen more than 200 graduate and undergraduate students studying computer science, social sciences, statistics, public policy and other quantitative fields undertaking a DSSG Fellowship at the University of Chicago.

The Alan Turing Institute’s vision to advance research for public good and train the next generation of leaders is directly aligned with DSSG’s own goal to produce data scientists with strong skills in solving real-world problems.

Fellows work with non-profit and government partners around the world. To date, more than 60 projects have run, which have helped lots of organisations do more with their data, enhancing their services, interventions and outreach so that they can fulfil their mission of improving lives across the world.

Further details on the fellowship can be found here.

Wed 17 Jul 2019, 10:03 | Tags: People Highlight Research Faculty of Science

Statistics News and Events

Physics Department News

First-ever visualisations of electrical gating effects on electronic structure could lead to longer-lasting devices

A team including Neil Wilson and Nick Hine has visualised the electronic structure in a microelectronic device for the first time, opening up opportunities for finely-tuned high-performance electronic devices.

Physicists from the University of Warwick and the University of Washington have developed a technique to measure the energy and momentum of electrons in operating microelectronic devices made of atomically thin, so-called two-dimensional, materials.

Using this information, they can create visual representations of the electrical and optical properties of the materials to guide engineers in maximising their potential in electronic components.

The experimentally-led study is published in Nature and could also help pave the way for the two-dimensional semiconductors that are likely to play a role in the next generation of electronics, in applications such as photovoltaics, mobile devices and quantum computers.

Thu 18 Jul 2019, 09:28 | Tags: Press, Research

News @ Warwick Chemistry

Life Sciences News

Bacteria such as E. coli detected in minutes by new technology

Dr Munehiro Asally, Dr James Stratford and colleagues, showed that bioelectrical signals from bacteria can be used to rapidly determine if they are alive or dead.

The findings offer a new technology which detects live bacteria in minutes instead of waiting for lab-test results which can take days.

When 'zapped' with an electrical field, live bacteria absorb dye molecules, causing the cells to light up and allowing them to be counted easily.

This rapid technique can detect antibiotic-resistant bacteria.

Press Release

Thu 13 Jun 2019, 15:10 | Tags: Biotechnology Press Release Research Faculty of Science

School of Engineering News

Applications being accepted to the new Centre for Doctoral Training to Advance the Deployment of Future Mobility Technologies

Stream 1: Wide Bandgap Power Electronics

  • Power Electronics fundamentals
  • Wide Bandgap device design and integration
  • Electrical transportation applications
  • Systems and control
  • Renewable energy systems

Stream 2: Connected and Autonomous Vehicles

  • Automotive sensors and sensor fusion
  • Network and Communications for Connected Car
  • Machine Intelligence and Data Science
  • Human Technology Interaction
  • Robust Automotive Embedded Systems

WMG News

Charging ahead at Battery School

PhD students, and future battery engineers, from leading universities across the UK joined us for a special week-long Battery School at our Energy Innovation Centre, for the Faraday Institution, recently.

eicIn our role as the Electrical Energy Storage APC Spoke, our battery experts facilitated a mix of lectures and practical sessions covering electrochemistry, applications, future technologies, manufacturing, safety, testing, forensics and battery end of life.

Fran Long, Education and Training Co-ordinator, at The Faraday Institution, said: “The WMG Battery School, at the University of Warwick, gave our PhD students a wonderful week of detailed theory and practice with an abundance of high quality lectures and ‘hands-on’ lab sessions.

“We would like to thank all of the WMG staff involved in making this such a valuable experience for the students. Encouraging the next generation of engineers into battery related careers, is extremely important for the UK’s electrification sector.”

The Faraday Institution is the UK’s independent institute for electrochemical energy storage science and technology, supporting research, training, and analysis. It brings together scientists and industry partners on research projects to reduce battery cost, weight, and volume; to improve performance and reliability; and to develop whole-life strategies from mining to recycling to second use.

The Battery School is part of the Faraday Battery Challenge, along with the UK Battery Industrialisation Centre (of which WMG was part of the winning consortium).

Find out more about our Energy Innovation Centre here.


Maths

News from Medical School

Psychology

Pre-term babies are less likely to form romantic relationships in adulthood

https://warwick.ac.uk/newsandevents/pressreleases/pre-term_babies_are

Fri 19 Jul 2019, 08:39 | Tags: research