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View the latest news from departments within the Faculty of Science, Engineering and Medicine below.
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Computer Science News Read more from Computer Science News

New Head of Department

Yulia TimofeevaFrom 1 September 2021, the Department will be lead by our new Head, Professor Yulia Timofeeva. On this occasion, Professor Lorenzo Frigerio, Vice Provost and Chair of the Faculty, said:

On behalf of the Faculty of Science, Engineering and Medicine, I would like to express my thanks to Ranko for his outstanding service as HoD. I am delighted to welcome Yulia as new head of Computer Science, and wish her all the best with supporting the continued success of this department!

Tue 31 Aug 2021, 17:25 | Tags: Highlight Faculty of Science

Statistics News and Events Read more from Statistics News and Events

Ian Hamilton wins the University of Warwick Productivity and Futures of Work GRP essay competition

Ian says: "The essay was based on the question "'What did the perfect day look like in the different stages of the pandemic? What does it mean for future productivity at work?" My response discussed the interconnectedness of work productivity with other productivities in our lives, both our own and of those around us." The essay can be viewed here.

Mon 15 Nov 2021, 12:05 | Tags: Dept, Faculty of Science, Prizes and Awards

Physics Department News Read more from Physics Department News

£3.5 million donation for aspiring astronomers to reach for the stars

World-leading research by Astronomy and Astrophysics leads to an incredible £3.5 million philanthropic gift to support PhD scholarships, early career researchers and deeper research into unexplored areas.

Find out more about the donation.

Wed 06 Oct 2021, 12:03 | Tags: Feature News, Press, announcements, Faculty of Science

News Library Read more from News Library

Life Sciences News Read more from Life Sciences News

COP26 – reflections on attending as an Observer from Warwick

Hendrik SchaferProfessor Hendrik Schafer shares his reflections on attending COP26:

"When I was asked whether I’d want to be part of the delegation that the University sends to COP26 in Glasgow, I did not have to think about it for long, after all, Climate Change is the biggest challenge that we are facing as global human society. Although I only spent two days at COP, I look back at this as a positive and worthwhile activity.

Despite disappointment about the watered-down COP26 declaration, I think that COP26 has brought some progress overall. There is an increased sense of urgency and political will to start tackling the issue, and although I personally think that we need much faster and more ambitious action, any progress is welcome and significant. Annual submissions of national action plans will hopefully lead to increasing pressure on countries to accelerate action rather than delaying it, but the acid test will be whether actions will lead to a slowdown in greenhouse-gas emissions over the next few years.

Another important milestone is that protection and regeneration of natural ecosystems such as forests, mangroves, saltmarshes and seagrass meadows is finally recognised by COP as an important part of the strategy to combat climate change. Those coastal marine ecosystems, which are referred to as ‘blue carbon’ environments are incredibly effective carbon sinks, whose protection will not only ensure a contribution to carbon sequestration but enhance biodiversity and deliver a raft of positive ecosystem services. Nevertheless, there is a need to understand in more detail, how these ecosystems will respond to climate change and to monitor their actual C sequestration. These are research activities that we are in a good position to contribute to with several groups studying relevant environmental processes and trace gases. Another area that is getting more attention is the carbon footprint of agriculture, again an area where we have critical expertise and where SLS researchers can make contributions to the research agenda.

Whilst those are important areas where a more detailed scientific understanding is required, the basic science background of climate change has been clear for too long, with no sense of urgency and too little action. The key question is how we get society to make the changes that are required. I believe that creating a dialogue between citizens, scientists, business, and government at various levels will be vital for driving positive changes. There have been excellent examples at COP26 that illustrate the critical role of positive communication and citizen involvement and how these can lead to the creation of action plans at local and regional level with positive outcomes for local communities. It needs a few success stories that deliver positive change in quality of life and sustainability, which will hopefully increase the roll out of programmes for mitigation and adaptation measures, especially if there is a demand and acceptance from the public for positive action. The University is already looking at opportunities to engage with local community and governments to enhance sustainability in the region.

There is huge potential across the university to be a centre for climate action, going well beyond the research on innovation in the automotive sector, but also in the humanities, arts, economics, and of course Life Sciences."


School of Engineering News Read more from School of Engineering News

Trembling aspen leaves could save future Mars rovers

Warwick Engineering researchers have been inspired by the unique movement of trembling aspen leaves, to devise an energy harvesting mechanism that could power weather sensors in hostile environments and could even be a back-up energy supply that could save and extend the life of future Mars rovers

Wed 27 Mar 2019, 15:31 | Tags: Fluid Undergraduate Research Faculty of Science

WMG News Read more from WMG News

Maths Read more from Mathematics Institute News

Caroline Series awarded the David Crighton Medal

Professor Caroline Series, FRS has been awarded the 2021 David Crighton Medal by the Institute of Mathematics and its Applications and the London Mathematical Society. This is in recognition of her fundamental and beautiful results connecting geometry and dynamical systems, and her outstanding service to the mathematical community, including her pioneering work to support the careers of women in mathematics.

See full citation here.

Wed 21 Jul 2021, 17:20 | Tags: People, Mathematics, Faculty of Science, FRS

News from Medical School Read more from Latest News

Psychology Read more from Psychology News