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Inorganic Materials

Dr Richard Walton, from the Department of Chemistry has co-edited a series of five books Inorganic Materials, alongside Duncan W. Bruce and Dermot O'Hare.

The Inorganic Materials series contains five volumes, based on the physical properties of each material:

Each themed volume is a self-contained reference, containing four to five topical review chapters. The chapters cover recent research areas within the contributors' field of knowledge, and provide a clear and useable introduction to that field. Authored by leading international researchers, each volume reflects the diversity of the subject areas, and together they provide an invaluable survey of the field of inorganic materials.


Molecular Materials
Duncan W. Bruce (Editor), Dermot O'Hare (Co-Editor), Richard Walton (Co-Editor)

With applications in optoelectronics and photonics, quantum information processing, nanotechnology and data storage, molecular materials enrich our daily lives in countless ways. These materials have properties that depend on their exact structure, the degree of order in the way the molecules are aligned and their crystalline nature. Small, delicate changes in molecular structure can totally alter the properties of the material in bulk.

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Low-Dimensional Solids
Duncan W. Bruce (Editor), Dermot O'Hare (Co-Editor), Richard Walton (Co-Editor)

With physical properties that often may not be described by the transposition of physical laws from 3D space across to 2D or even 1D space, low-dimensional solids exhibit a high degree of anisotropy in the spatial distribution of their chemical bonds. This means that they can demonstrate new phenomena such as charge-density waves and can display nanoparticulate (0D), fibrous (1D) and lamellar (2D) morphologies.

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Porous Materials
Duncan W. Bruce (Editor), Dermot O'Hare (Co-Editor), Richard Walton (Co-Editor)

In the past few decades, the increasingly routine use of advanced structural probes for studying the structure and dynamics of the solid state has led to some dramatic developments in the field of porous solids. These materials are fundamental in a diverse range of applications, such as shape-selective catalysts for energy-efficient organic transformations, new media for pollutant removal, and gas storage materials for energy technologies. Porosity in inorganic materials may range from the nano-scale to the macro-scale, and the drive towards particular properties remains the goal in this fast-developing area of research.

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Functional Oxides
Duncan W. Bruce (Editor), Dermot O'Hare (Co-Editor), Richard Walton (Co-Editor)

Functional oxides have a wide variety of applications in the electronic industry. The discovery of new metal oxides with interesting and useful properties continues to drive much research in chemistry, physics, and materials science. In Functional Oxides five topical areas have been selected to illustrate the importance of metal oxides in modern materials chemistry: Noncentrosymmetric Inorganic Oxide Materials; Geometrically Frustrated Magnetic Materials; Lithium Ion Conduction in Oxides; Thermoelectric Oxides; Transition Metal Oxides - Magnetoresistance and Half-Metallicity.

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Energy Materials
Duncan W. Bruce (Editor), Dermot O'Hare (Co-Editor), Richard Walton (Co-Editor)

In an age of global industrialisation and population growth, the area of energy is one that is very much in the public consciousness. Fundamental scientific research is recognised as being crucial to delivering solutions to these issues, particularly to yield novel means of providing efficient, ideally recyclable, ways of converting, transporting and delivering energy. This volume deals considers a selection of the state-of-the-art materials that are being designed to meet some of the energy challenges we face today.

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