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Gender and International Development (MA) (2022 Entry)

About this taught graduate course

Course overview

If you are interested in questioning the concepts of gender and development, and giving priority to issues and debates identified within specific countries – rather than relying on predominantly western literature – then this is the programme for you. It is an international, interdisciplinary and analytical course. It does not assume that development is about the ‘third world’ modelling itself on the west, nor about women modelling themselves on men.

Skills from this degree

  • Ability to analyse and evaluate development policy
  • Ability to analyse and evaluate development practices
  • Ability to analyse gendered effects of development policy and practice
  • Ability to carry out independent research
  • Ability to understand and assess claims to knowledge made by a range of relevant disciplines
  • Ability to write about complex ideas in a clear way

General entry requirements

Minimum requirements

2:i undergraduate degree (or equivalent) in a related subject.


English language requirements

You can find out more about our English language requirements. This course requires the following:

  • Band B
  • IELTS overall score of 7.0, minimum component scores of two at 6.0/6.5 and the rest at 7.0 or above.

International qualifications

We welcome applications from students with other internationally recognised qualifications.

For more information, please visit the international entry requirements page.


Additional requirements

Read our department advice on applying to ensure your application has the best chance for success.

Core modules

Gender, Analysis and Development Practice

This module will give experience in applying different concepts and theoretical perspectives to practical issues and problems in gender and development, as a means of learning how to undertake rigorous analysis. It will include focused sessions on the research literatures, followed by group work analysing case studies from different regions of the globe. The specific case studies used illustrate current debates in the literature and address key issues in contemporary development practice.

Gender, Imperialism and International Development

This module fosters comprehensive, critical and advanced knowledge of theoretical approaches to gender and development. It starts by locating gender and development within a history of colonialism, imperialism and orientalism, asking how gender relations have shaped and been shaped by colonialism; how contemporary forms of western imperialism invoke ideas about gender; and how far western feminism has been able to resist orientalist ideas about a ‘modern’ west and a ‘backward’ east. Then it looks critically at some of the measures of gendered development today, including the GDI, GEM, Millennium Development Goals and the replacement Sustainable Development Goals.

Dissertation (Year One full-time and Year Two part-time)

The dissertation module gives you the opportunity to complete an independent piece of research on a topic of your own choice with the support of your dissertation supervisor, plenary teaching, and other online resources. The aim is for you to creatively use the substantive and methodological training acquired in the earlier part of your course to critically analyse a research topic of sociological relevance.


Optional modules

You can take four optional modules, at least one from List (A) and one from List (B). Further modules can be taken from any list but no more than one outside option can normally be taken, from the list of Recommended Outside Options (List D) or, by agreement with the Course Convenor, one module offered by another Department or Centre within the Faculty of Social Sciences.

List A

  • Market Life: Wealth and Poverty in Global Capitalism
  • Social Research for Social Change
  • The Sociology of Urban Life
  • Postcolonial Theory and Politics
  • Transnational Media Ecologies
  • Feminist Pedagogy Feminist Activism
  • Queering Sociology
  • Indigenous and Global South Feminisms

List B

  • Qualitative Methods in Social Research
  • Quantitative Methods in Social Research
  • Understanding Social Science
  • Researching Inequality: Race, Class, Gender in Global Perspective

List C

  • Politics and Social Theory
  • Capitalism, State and Market
  • State of the Art of Sociology
  • Sociology of End Times
  • Prisons, Punishment and Penal Policy: A Comparative Perspective
  • Mastering Complex Real-World Data

List D

  • Women’s Human Rights and Global Justice

Read more about our core and optional modules on the Sociology website.


Teaching

Each of our MA courses has specified core modules which will be studied alongside a range of optional modules. You will be required to choose four optional modules from our departmental list. All our MA courses follow a consistent structure meaning that you will follow a programme of taught modules, followed by a 15,000-word dissertation.


Class sizes

Class sizes can range from 6 to 30 students, dependent on each module.


Typical contact hours

Each module consists of at least 20 hours of teaching. Many modules are taught in 2 hour seminars of 10-15 students. Others follow a 1 hour lecture and 1 hour class format. You will also have a supervisor for your dissertation, who you will meet regularly to support this independent research project.


Assessment

Taught modules are assessed through written assignments. You will focus on your 15-000 word dissertation after the end of Spring Term.


Reading lists

Most departments have reading lists available through Warwick Library. If you would like to view reading lists for the current cohort of students you can visit our Warwick Library web page.


Your timetable

Your personalised timetable will be complete when you are registered for all modules, compulsory and optional, and you have been allocated to your lectures, seminars and other small group classes. Your compulsory modules will be registered for you and you will be able to choose your optional modules when you join us.

Your career

Graduates from these courses have gone on to work for employers including: Coventry University, KPMG, Oxfam and Waitrose. They have pursued roles such as: business and financial project management professionals; higher education teaching professionals; IT project and programme managers; legal professionals and research and development managers.

Our department has a dedicated professionally qualified Senior Careers Consultant offering impartial advice and guidance together with workshops and events throughout the year. Previous examples of workshops and events include:

  • Make Your Mark - Careers with a degree in Sociology
  • Working for More than Profit
  • Warwick careers fairs throughout the year
  • Your Sociological future: Sociology Alumni Evening
  • My Sociological Future- What next? Career planning for undecided Sociology finalists

Sociology at Warwick

We have an international reputation for research excellence, a global and cosmopolitan perspective, and high-quality teaching. Our curriculum offers a comprehensive and up-to-date foundation with a diverse range of specialist options:

What does it mean to understand the world in which you live? What will your contribution be to this changing world? How do your own experiences and life chances compare to those of others?

Sociology – the study of humans in society – attempts to capture the rich variety and complexity of human social life. Indeed, it is difficult to think of any area of social existence that a sociologist wouldn’t be interested in examining, from the most intimate of personal relationships to the worldwide circulation of ideas, beliefs, products and people.

Find out more about us on our website.


Our Postgraduate courses

Tuition fees

Tuition fees are payable for each year of your course at the start of the academic year, or at the start of your course, if later. Academic fees cover the cost of tuition, examinations and registration and some student amenities.

Taught course fees  Research course fees


Fee Status Guidance

The University carries out an initial fee status assessment based on information provided in the application and according to the guidance published by UKCISA. Students are classified as either Home or Overseas Fee status and this can determine the tuition fee and eligibility of certain scholarships and financial support.

If you receive an offer, your fee status will be stated with the tuition fee information, however we are awaiting guidance from the UK government regarding fee status for EU, other EEA and Swiss nationals and their family members living in the UK for academic year 2021/22 onwards. We are not able to confirm the fee status for these students until the relevant eligibility criteria have been confirmed. Once we have received further information from the UK government, we will provide you with an update on your fee status and let you know if any additional information is required. If you believe your fee status has been incorrectly classified you can complete a fee status assessment questionnaire (follow the instructions in your offer) and provide the required documentation for this to be reassessed.

The UK Council for International Student Affairs (UKCISA) provides guidance to UK universities on fees status criteria, you can find the latest guidance on the impact of Brexit on fees and student support on the UKCISA website.


Additional course costs

As well as tuition fees and living expenses, some courses may require you to cover the cost of field trips or costs associated with travel abroad. Information about department specific costs should be considered in conjunction with the more general costs below, such as:

  • Core text books
  • Printer credits
  • Dissertation binding
  • Robe hire for your degree ceremony

Scholarships and bursaries

Funding routes available

Find out about the many different funding routes available for postgraduate study at Warwick.

Living costs

Find out more about the cost of living as a postgraduate student at the University of Warwick.

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Taught course applications

Here is our checklist on how to apply for taught postgraduate courses at Warwick.

Research course applications

Here is our checklist on how to apply for research postgraduate degrees at the University of Warwick.

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Admissions statement

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Throughout the year we attend exhibitions and fairs online and in the UK. These events give you the chance to learn about our Master's and PhD study routes, and the wider context of postgraduate study.

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