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Peter Kirwan's Teaching Blog

Writing about web page http://www.kingsplace.co.uk/spoken-word/words-on-monday/edmund-spenser-and-the-faerie-queene

This looks like an amazing event - research talks and performance pieces based on The Faerie Queene. I can't make it, but I'd be fascinated to hear from anyone who makes it!

Programme includes:

David Fuller, Professor of English and former Orator of Durham University, taking us inside the remarkable world of Spenser’s stanza.

Bart Van Es, of St Catherine’s College Oxford, an eminent scholar of Spenser, on the significance of The Faerie Queene.

New verse by distinguished poets Jo Shapcott, Michael Symmons-Roberts, Andrew Shanks, and Ewan Fernie.

Monawar Hussain, Islamic chaplain at Eton College, on the resonances of The Faerie Queen in Muslim communities.

Original drama piece by Simon Palfrey, directed by Elisabeth Dutton, both of Oxford University,performed by an ensemble of professional actors, Oxford students, and inner-city comprehensive schoolchlidren.

Composer and virtuoso Tim Garland, playing his own specially commissioned music inspired by The Faerie Queene.

And, the celebrated Choir of Royal Holloway, University of London, conducted by Rupert Gough, performing music from the time of Spenser.

Best of luck to everybody for tomorrow's results!

If anyone wishes to discuss their Med/Ren marks, do get in touch. I'm away from Wednesday afternoon for a few days, but I'll get back to you as quickly as possible.

Tuesday 1st June 2010 (week 6)

9:10am, Butterworth Hall

Best of luck to you all!

This is an optional sample exercise, designed to give you practice on the commentary section of the exam. If you'd like to practice, please do e-mail me sample commentaries.

Comment briefly (approximately one side) on the following passage, taking into account points of interest in the passage itself, and its relation to the work as a whole.

'Lo, lord,' quoth the lede and the lace hondeled,
'This is the bende of this blame I bere in my nek;
This is the lothe and the losse that I laght have
Of cowardise and covetyse that I have caght thare;
This is the token of untrauthe that I am tan inne,
And I mot nedes it were whil I may last.
For none may hyden his harme bot unhap ne may hitte,
For ther hit ones is tached twynne wil hit never.

tached: attached
twynne: be separated

From Sir Gawain and The Green Knight, Fitt 4

I'm posting these now so they're available for anyone who wants them. Here are the last two optional passages for translation, which gives you four in all to practice on. As ever, do feel free to e-mail me with your versions and I'll be happy to give you feedback. If you complete all four and want more (!), let me know.

Gawain

"Nay, frayst I no fyght, in fayth I the telle.
Hit are aboute on this bench bot berdles childer.
If I were hasped in armes on a high stede,
Here is no mon me to mach, for myghtes so wayke.
Forthy I crave in this court a Cristmasse game,
For hit is Yol and Newe Yere and here are yep mony.
If any so hardy in this house holdes himselven,
Be so bold in his blode, brayn in his hed,
That dar stifly strike a stroke for an other,
I schal gif him of my gift this giserne rich,
This axe, that is hevy innogh, to hondele as him likes."

yep: young men
brayn: rash
giserne: axe

The Wife of Bath's Prologue

Wher can ye seye, in any manere age,
That hye God defended mariage
By expres word? I pray yow, telleth me.
Or where comanded he virginitee?
I woot as wel as ye, it is no drede,
Th'apostel, whan he speketh of maydenhede,
He seyde that precept therof hadde he noon.
Men may conseille a womman to been oon,
But conseillyng is no comandement.
He putte it in oure owene juggement;
For hadde God comanded maydenhede,
Thanne hadde he dampned weddyng with the dede.

expres: explicit
drede: doubt

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