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New book on Galen's Treatise On Simple Drugs

A special issue of Archives Internationales d'Histoire des Sciences on the interpretation and transmission of Galen's treatise On simple drugs. Guest editors: Caroline Petit (Warwick), Matteo Martelli (Bologna), Lucia Raggetti (Bologna).

The volume explores the fate of Greek text across time, languages and cultures. It arises from a BA-Leverhulme-funded project, 'Rethinking Ancient Pharmacology' and a conference at the BSR in 2017.


Congratulations to Dr Caroline Petit!

We are delighted to announce that Dr Caroline Petit has been awarded the prestigious Friedrich Wilhelm Bessel Research Award from the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation in Germany.

The award recognises Dr Petit’s excellent academic achievements, and she will be invited to carry out a new research project of her choosing in collaboration with colleagues in Germany.

Dr Petit’s research interests lie in the textual transmission, translation and interpretation of ancient medical texts. This includes the many ways they have been appropriated up to modern times.

Her recent projects include ‘Medical Prognosis in Late Antiquity’ (Wellcome Trust University Award, 2013-2018) and ‘Rethinking Ancient Pharmacology' (British Academy - Leverhulme 2017-2019).

In 2019 she was awarded the prestigious Médaille de Chénier by the French Académie des Inscriptions et des Belles Lettres for her recent book on the Greek physician and philosopher Galen of Pergamum (Galien de Pergame ou la rhétorique de la Providence. Médecine, littérature et pouvoir à Rome, Brill 2018). This medal is a distinction awarded only to one scholar every five years in recognition of outstanding scholarship in ancient Greek.

Find out more about Dr Petit’s research.



Congratulations to Joe Sanzo, awarded a European Research Council Starting Grant!

Dr Sanzo said: “Although scholarly study of the early Jewish and Christian practices, rituals, and texts deemed “magical” has blossomed over the past few decades, this research has tended to be divided along disciplinary lines, with historians of Judaism studying Jewish magic and historians of Christianity studying Christian magic.

“This grant will allow an interdisciplinary team to address this scholarly gap by examining local and global features of the magical artefacts – and the literary traditions about magic – from late-antique Jewish and Christian communities. In particular, my project will focus on the similarities, differences, and contacts between these traditions in four central areas of their magical practices: biblical texts and traditions; sacred names and titles; the word-image-material relation; and references to illicit rituals.”

Wed 04 Sep 2019, 18:01 | Tags: Faculty of Arts Funding Research Research funding


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