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Journal Club Summer Plans

  • Sean Carroll's Mindscape. This podcast, by Caltech theoretical physicist Sean Carroll, interviews guests from a wide range of backgrounds.
  • Physics World do a weekly podcast, exploring the latest in physics news.
  • Talk Nerdy is a podcast hosted by Cara Santa Maria that has weekly episodes on all aspects of science.
  • In the Titanium Physicists podcast, they challenge their guests to make complex physics as understandable as possible.
  • Crowd Science starts with a simple question each episode and explores all aspects of it with different guests.
  • What The If explores the intersection of science-fact and science-fiction by exploring topics with scientists and sci-fi writers.
  • Brain's On is a podcast aimed at younger students.
  • Cosmic shambles have podcasts on science and books (a lot of which are about science) that include comedians like Robin Ince and Josie Long (suggested by Duncan Brealey).
  • Radio 4 have a huge variety of science-based podcasts including The Curious Cases of Rutherford and Fry, The Life Scientific and The Infinite Monkey Cage (suggested by Maxine Haddleton).
  • Shining a DIamond Light is a podcast produced by the Diamond synchrotron that looks at the different roles within their facility (suggested by Chris Bloomer).

"Physics Special Topics is a journal of short, often fun and quirky, quantitative science articles that are written, refereed and edited by undergraduate students as part of their MPhys degree." You can access their entire back catalogue of short papers here.

Quanta magazine is a great website for easy-to-read physics news that remains at the cutting edge.

There are some great books you might be interested in:

  • Apollo 11. This documentary by Todd Douglas Miller, released on the fiftieth anniversary of Apollo 11, presents the events surrounding the mission using solely archival footage and still photographs associated with the mission. It includes never before seen footage and is a remarkable watch.

  • Virtual tours of CERN. Take a look around the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) and its four detectors - they're all on Google Street View!

  • Cosmic shambles has regular live streams of discussions and talks that involve science (suggested by Duncan Brealey).
  • Mind Your Decisions by Presh Talwalkar is a YouTube channel that explores interesting maths problems with sources from all over the world (suggested by Jack Bradshaw).
  • Let There Be Light is a documentary about the quest to create a net-positive fusion reactor on earth (one that outputs more energy than is input) (suggested by Jack Bradshaw).
  • 3 Blue 1 Brown is a YouTube channel that has some great explanations of the concepts in maths that would be useful to physics such as linear algebra, calculus and differential equations (suggested by Dr Tim Martin).
  • Numberphile is another YouTube channel that looks at some interested concepts in maths (suggested by Tom Jones).
  • Sixty Symbols is a YouTube channel that looks at a wide range of physics concepts (suggested by Tom Jones).
  • Khan academy have some great sections on physics, basic maths, algebra and differential equations which would all be useful to be refreshed on (suggested by Professor Sandra Chapman).
  • You can also tour and explore ITER, which aims to be the first device to output more energy than is input through nuclear fusion (suggested by Amani Zalzali).
  • There are some good physics-based Instagram accounts such as physicsfun, daily_physics_, astroscience.ig, and physics_formula (suggested by Charlie Slade)
  • Von Karman Public Lectures by NASA Jet Propulsion Lab (suggested by Ben Tatman).
  • The Diamond Light source has a vast array of resources from videos of the synchrotron to simulations that allow you to run your own synchroton (suggested by Chris Bloomer).
  • If you're going to university to study physics (or something highly mathematical next year) you might be interested in the following:
    • We have produced this vectors booklet to remind yourself about vectors and do a lot of practice. It's one of the key areas to thoroughly understand at the start of a physics degree. The booklet has links to videos and applets that will guide you to understand some of the basic aspects of vectors and give you ample opportunity to practice (which is the most important part).
    • You could also look at the Cambridge STEP papers as a more advanced test of your current knowledge.
    • 3 Blue 1 Brown is a YouTube channel that has some great explanations of the concepts in maths that would be useful to physics such as linear algebra, calculus and differential equations (suggested by Dr Tim Martin).
    • Khan academy have some great sections on physics, basic maths, algebra and differential equations which would all be useful to be refreshed on (suggested by Professor Sandra Chapman).
    • Isaac Physics has a wealth of content for all ages (suggested by Ben Tatman).
    • Math Centre has a huge number of resources to practice any of the topics in mathematics, with lots of examples to help you out (suggested by Prof. Adrian Wilson).
  • If you're going to start A-level physics you might want to look at
    • We produced these resources for the GCSE Space topic. As you might not have studied it before the pandemic struck, it could be a good time to learn more about space by attempting the questions in the booklet and checking your answers in the presentation (along with video links and images).

    • Isaac Physics has a wealth of content for all ages (suggested by Ben Tatman).
    • Math Centre has a huge number of resources to practice any of the topics in mathematics, with lots of examples to help you out (suggested by Prof. Adrian Wilson).