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Popular Democracy, Caste Wars, and State Formation


Lecture powerpoint

Questions

  • How democratic were Latin America’s post-Independence Republics?
  • How did issues of race affect the development of Latin America’s post-Independence Republics?

Required Reading

  • James E. Sanders, "Citizens of a Free People": Popular Liberalism and Race in Nineteenth-Century Southwestern Colombia, Hispanic American Historical Review, Vol. 84, No. 2 (May, 2004), pp. 277-313
  • Peter Guardino, “Barbarism or Republican Law? Guerrero's Peasants and National Politics, 1820-1846”, Hispanic American Historical Review

Additional Reading

  • Carlos A Foment, Democracy in Latin America, 1750-1900, Chapters 1 and 2, 1-36
  • Will Fowler (ed.), Malcontents, Rebels, and Pronunciados: The Politics of Insurrection in Nineteenth Century Mexico
  • Peter Guardino, “Barbarism or Republican Law? Guerrero's Peasants and National Politics, 1820-1846,” Hispanic American Historical Review
  • Cecilia Méndez, The plebeian republic : the Huanta rebellion and the making of the Peruvian state, 1820-1850
  • Terry Rugeley, “Rural Political Violence and the Origins of the Caste War,” Americas,
  • Terry Rugeley, Yucatán's Maya peasantry and the origins of the Caste War
  • Florencia Mallon, Peasant and Nation
  • James E. Sanders, “Atlantic Republicanism in Nineteenth-Century Colombia: Spanish America's Challenge to the Contours of Atlantic History,” Journal of World History, Vol. 20, No. 1 (Mar., 2009), pp. 131-150
  • Guy P. C. Thomson, “Bulwarks of Patriotic Liberalism: The National Guard, Philharmonic Corps and Patriotic Juntas in Mexico, 1847-88,” Journal of Latin American Studies, Vol. 22, No. 1 (Feb., 1990), pp. 31-68
  • Guy P. C. Thomson, “Popular Aspects of Liberalism in Mexico, 1848-1888, Bulletin of Latin American Research, Vol. 10, No. 3 (1991), pp. 265-292
  • John Tutino, “The Revolution in Mexican Independence: Insurgency and the Renegotiation of Property, Production, and Patriarchy in the Bajío, 1800-1855,” Hispanic American Historical Review.