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News @ Warwick Chemistry

All events shown in the Department Calendar including the Departmental Seminar Programme.

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The world's most famous table: 150 years of Periodic Law

Warwick colleagues select some of the most important elements to them from the Periodic Table, an idea first presented by Russian chemist Dmitrii Mendeleev 150 years ago this month.


Stand up to Cancer: TV stars backing Warwick scientists' incredible cancer breakthrough

Two virtual reality videos have been released for this month's Stand Up To Cancer event which showcase research from the University of Warwick and are narrated by actress Olivia Colman and Stephen Fry.

Scientists at Warwick University have discovered an incredible new way of administering chemotherapy drugs which is more effective and safer for the patient.

Stand Up To Cancer is a joint fundraising campaign from Cancer Research UK and Channel 4, which aims to accelerate ground-breaking research, like that being done in Coventry, in order to save lives.

Wed 24 Oct 2018, 11:22 | Tags: PolymerChem

Welcome to Honorary Professorial Fellow Ezat Khoshdel

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We are pleased to announce Ezat Khoshdel has been appointed as an Honorary Professorial Fellow in the department. Ezat has been a long-standing collaborator with the department with multiple projects over 25 years. Ezat has recently retired from Unilever where he was the inventor of over 150 patents, the largest number of any Unilever employee. Ezat will be more than happy to discuss ideas and work across the department and add to our impact activities. Ezat can be contacted on E.Khoshdel@warwick.ac.uk and will next be in the department on October 11th when he gives a lecture to our new Polymer MSc cohort.

Fri 17 Aug 2018, 12:59 | Tags: PolymerChem people

Freezing cells made safer thanks to new polymer made at University of Warwick

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Freezing cells made safer thanks to new polymer made at University of Warwick

 

- A new polymer that’s a cryoprotectant dramatically improves the freezing of cells has been discovered by researchers at the University of Warwick

- The new polymers can reduce the amount of organic solvent required in cryopreservation (freezing cells) as well as giving more and healthier cells after thawing

- Findings may help reduce cost and improve distribution of cells for cell-based therapies, diagnostics and research

 

Cell freezing (cryopreservation) – which is essential in cell transfusions as well as basic biomedical research – can be dramatically improved using a new polymeric cryoprotectant, discovered at the University of Warwick, which reduces the amount of ‘anti-freeze’ needed to protect cells.

 

The ability to freeze and store cells for cell-based therapies and research has taken a step forward in the paper ‘A synthetically scalable poly(ampholyte) which dramatically Enhances Cellular Cryopreservation.’ published by the University of Warwick’s Department of Chemistry and Medical School in the journal Biomacromolecules. The new polymer material protects the cells during freezing, leading to more cells being recovered and less solvent-based antifreeze being required.

 

Cryopreservation of cells is an essential process, enabling banking and distribution of cells, which would otherwise degrade. The current methods rely on adding traditional ‘antifreezes’ to the cells to protect them from the cold stress, but not all the cells are recovered and it is desirable to lower the amount of solvent added.

 

The new Warwick material was shown to allow cryopreservation using less solvent. In particular, the material was very potent at protecting cell monolayers – cells which are attached to a surface, which is the format of how they are grown and used in most biomedical research.

 

Having more, and better quality cells, is crucial not just for their use in medicine, but to improve the quality and accessibility of cells for the discovery of new drugs for example.

 

Cell-based therapies are emerging as the “fourth pillar” of chemo-therapy. New methods to help distribute and bank these cells will help make them more accessible and speed up their roll-out, and this new material may aid this process.

 

Professor Matthew Gibson who holds a joint appointment between the Department of Chemistry and Warwick Medical School comments:

 

“Cryopreservation is fundamental to so much modern bioscience and medicine, but we urgently need better methods to meet the needs of advanced cell-based therapies. Our new material is easy to scale up, which is essential if this is to be widely used, and we found it to be very protective for several cell lines. The simplicity of our approach will hopefully help us translate this to real applications quickly, and make an impact in healthcare and basic research.”

 

ENDS

 

29 JULY 2019

 

NOTES TO EDITORS

 

High-res image available at:

https://warwick.ac.uk/services/communications/medialibrary/images/july2019/mg_cells.jpg

 

Credit: University of Warwick. Caption: The cells frozen with the polymer (left) and without the polymer (right)

 

Paper available to view at: https://pubs.acs.org/doi/10.1021/acs.biomac.9b00681

 

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION PLEASE CONTACT:

Alice Scott
Media Relations Manager – Science
University of Warwick
Tel: +44 (0) 2476 574 255 or +44 (0) 7920 531 221
E-mail: alice.j.scott@warwick.ac.uk

Tue 20 Aug 2019, 10:29 | Tags: news PolymerChem publications Research news

Warwick Chemistry graduate invents revolutionary device for testing drugs

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Dr Gabit Nurumbetov, Principal Scientist at Medherant Ltd - a spin-out of the University of Warwick which produces next-generation drug delivery patches - has invented a revolutionary device for testing transdermal drugs more quickly, efficiently and accurately. Dr Nurumbetov completed his PhD in the Department of Chemistry with Professor Stefan Bon then worked as a postdoctoral researcher in Professor David Haddleton’s group.

https://www2.warwick.ac.uk/newsandevents/pressreleases/warwick_grad_invents

Tue 14 Nov 2017, 14:25 | Tags: PolymerChem

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