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Increase in the living wage is welcomed, but ‘more needs to be done’ says ReWAGE advisory group

The ReWAGE advisory group co-chaired by Professor Chris Warhurst of the Warwick Institute for Employment Research has put forward six recommendations for changes in public policy to help the low-paid in a new policy brief.


Disability employment reporting should be mandatory says ReWAGE and Disability@Work

ReWAGE and Disability@Work have jointly responded to the government’s consultation on disability workforce reporting, which was launched in December 2021 to help inform and shape the government’s future approach. The response argues that while most government policy has focused on disabled people’s job-seeking activity and incentives to work, even the most positive measures will only prove effective if disabled people have jobs to go to.

Fri 08 Apr 2022, 12:58 | Tags: disability, work, ReWAGE

Large-scale experiment reveals new insights into inequality in the workplace

Is there a flaw in initiatives to increase diversity at work? A new study by researchers at Columbia University and the University of Warwick finds that in the USA, white employees can unintentionally perpetuate inequality by ignoring and underestimating their black peers.


Expert advisory group to help drive progress towards more good jobs in the post-pandemic UK

A new group of expert economic and social sciences researchers has come together to provide independent, evidence-based advice to policymakers on work and employment as the UK emerges from the COVID-19 pandemic. Launched this morning (10 August 2021), the Renewing Work Advisory Group of Experts (ReWAGE) will be co-chaired by Professor Chris Warhurst of the University of Warwick’s Institute for Employment Research and Professor Irena Grugulis, Chair of Work and Skills at Leeds University Business School.


Disability gap in young people’s post-16 destinations and employment outcomes revealed by new analysis

Important differences in the post-16 pathways of disabled young people compared to those of their non-disabled peers have been revealed in a new working paper from University of Warwick researchers. The working paper also documents the impact of different types of disabilities, and shows that disability inequalities in post-16 destinations and economic activity in early adulthood are also influenced by social class, ethnicity, and gender.


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