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Global History and Culture Centre blog on pandemics

Dr Guido van Meersbergen has published a GHCC blog on pandemics at: https://warwick.ac.uk/fac/arts/history/ghcc/blog/

One piece features Amy Evans, our GHCC secretary at: https://warwick.ac.uk/fac/arts/history/ghcc/blog/amy_and_the .


Dr Anna Hájková awarded the Orpheus Iris award

Dr Anna Hájková has been awarded the Orpheus Iris award by the International Rainbow Culture Network, details of the award can be seen at: http://www.ilgcn.tupilak.org/2020/04/orpheus-iris-2020-award-for-holocaust.html

Fri 01 May 2020, 09:38 | Tags: Impact and Public Engagement Award Research Announcement

POSTPONED - Prof Catherine Hall, ‘Being an historian – then and now’ - Wednesday 26 February

*** PLEASE NOTE THIS EVENT HAS BEEN POSTPONED DUE TO UCU STRIKE ACTION ***

Prof Catherine Hall, ‘Being an historian – then and now’

Wednesday 26 February, 5 PM, OC0.01 (Refreshments will be served from 4:30 PM onwards, all welcome)

Hosted by the Feminist History Group and the History Research Seminar

Chair: Laura Schwartz

Reflecting upon her personal and political life as a feminist and postcolonial historian, Professor Hall will consider the politics of intellectual work, how ideas emerge from movements and communities, and what politically-engaged historians should be doing in the present conjuncture.

Catherine Hall is Emerita Professor of Modern British Social and Cultural History at University College London. She is known for her work on gender, class and empire in the 19th century, particularly her pioneering Family fortunes: men and women of the English middle class, 1780-1850 (new edn. Routledge, 2002) which she published with Leonore Davidoff in 1987 and Civilising Subjects; metropole and colony in the English imagination 1830-1867 (University of Chicago Press, 2002), one of the first substantive feminist histories to take up questions of race as central to the formation of modern Britain, a work influenced by black feminism. Hall published Macaulay and Son: architects of imperial Britain (Yale University Press) in 2012 and is Chair of the Centre for the Study of the Legacies of British Slave-ownership.

Professor Hall was active in Birmingham women's liberation and attended the first national women's liberation conference at Ruskin in 1970. From 1981-1997 she was a member of the Feminist Review Collective. Her journalism and scholarship most recently includes a history of the ‘hostile environment’.

Mon 03 Feb 2020, 15:15 | Tags: Research Seminars (Internal)

ESRC Doctoral Training Partnership studentships competition is now open!

The Midlands Graduate School open competition for studentships commencing in October 2020 is now open! Deadline for applications is Wednesday 22nd January 2020. Please note that there are several elements to the application process and applicants should allow plenty of time to assemble all the information required.

The Midlands Graduate School DTP makes an annual award of a large number of studentships to outstanding applicants across the Social Sciences. The studentships are linked to disciplinary and inter-disciplinary training pathways, and some have a built-in element of collaboration.

Mon 11 Nov 2019, 14:31 | Tags: Award Research Postgraduate Recruitment Funding Competition

AHRC Midlands4Cities DTP - Application Workshop

For any students thinking of applying for AHRC Midlands4Cities funding to complete a PhD, an application workshop will be taking place on Saturday 16th November at Coventry University. Details of the event can be found on the following page:

https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/midlands4cities-application-writing-workshop-coventry-tickets-76774172617

The workshops are aimed at potential students who are planning to submit an application for PhD research to Midlands4Cities. Practical advice will be given on how to plan your application and structure your research proposal.

You can attend any of the application writing workshops regardless of which M4C institution you are applying to.

Fri 08 Nov 2019, 12:23 | Tags: Research Postgraduate Funding Competition Faculty of Arts

PhD research features in BBC HistoryExtra magazine

The Peterloo Massacre took place on 16 August 1819 and is considered a landmark moment in the struggle for democracy in Britain. However, the number of people present at the Massacre may have been “significantly smaller” than previously thought, according to research by History PhD student Dave Steele.

The full article is available on the BBC HistoryExtra website.

Fri 09 Aug 2019, 11:41 | Tags: Impact and Public Engagement, Research, Postgraduate

History of Science and Technology Hub launched

We’re delighted to announce the launch of the History of Science and Technology Hub at the University of Warwick.

The University of Warwick has a wealth of expertise in the history of science and technology. We cover the full range of scientific disciplines, from physics to anthropology to economics, as well as the technologies associated with them. Our teaching and research in this area is distinctive. It links up the history of scientific theories with wider historical phenomena such as war, religion, globalisation, ideology, social and environmental change, and the rise and fall of states and empires. This work is integrated into various projects in the History Department and is connected to other Warwick research centres in the sciences, humanities and social sciences.

The History of Science and Technology Hub is a portal to the people, teaching, research and events related to the history of science and technology at Warwick.

To find out more please visit our website or follow us on Twitter. 

Thu 20 Jun 2019, 12:02 | Tags: Research

Materials of the Mind: Phrenology, Race, and the Global History of Science, 1815-1920

Materials of the Mind 
Materials of the Mind: Phrenology, Race, and the Global History of Science, 1815-1920, by Dr James Poskett (University of Warwick), is a new monograph published by University of Chicago Press.

Phrenology was the most popular mental science of the Victorian age. From American senators to Indian social reformers, this new mental science found supporters around the globe. Materials of the Mind tells the story of how phrenology changed the world—and how the world changed phrenology.

This is a story of skulls from the Arctic, plaster casts from Haiti, books from Bengal, and letters from the Pacific. Drawing on far-flung museum and archival collections, and addressing sources in six different languages, Materials of the Mind is an impressively innovative account of science in the nineteenth century as part of global history. It shows how the circulation of material culture underpinned the emergence of a new materialist philosophy of the mind, while also demonstrating how a global approach to history can help us reassess issues such as race, technology, and politics today.

Details of all the monographs and edited collection of the Warwick University History Department's current academic staff are available online, and the details of all the monographs and edited collection of the Warwick University History Department's emeritus academic staff are also available online.

 

Wed 01 May 2019, 09:19 | Tags: Research Publication

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