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Emeritus Staff Academic Publications

Below are the monographs and edited collections of the emeritus staff of the Department, listed alphabetically by author/editor. For details of articles and book chapters authored by the emeritus staff, please see the emeritus staff webpages. Please also see the academic publications of the current academic staff. 
 
 

A

Arnold, David - 01 - Everyday Technology: Machines and the Making of India's Modernity

Everyday Technology 
Everyday Technology: Machines and the Making of India's Modernity

David Arnold, University of Chicago Press, 2013

In 1909 Mohandas Karamchand Gandhi, on his way back to South Africa from London, wrote his now celebrated tract Hind Swaraj, laying out his vision for the future of India and famously rejecting the technological innovations of Western civilization. Despite his protestations, Western technology endured and helped to make India one of the leading economies in our globalized world. Few would question the dominant role that technology plays in modern life, but to fully understand how India first advanced into technological modernity, argues David Arnold, we must consider the technology of the everyday. "Everyday Technology" is a pioneering account of how small machines and consumer goods that originated in Europe and North America became objects of everyday use in India in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. Rather than investigate "big" technologies such as railways and irrigation projects, Arnold examines the assimilation and appropriation of bicycles, rice mills, sewing machines, and typewriters in India, and follows their impact on the ways in which people worked and traveled, the clothes they wore, and the kinds of food they ate. But the effects of these machines were not limited to the daily rituals of Indian society, and Arnold demonstrates how such small-scale technologies became integral to new ways of thinking about class, race, and gender, as well as about the politics of colonial rule and Indian nationhood. Arnold's fascinating book offers new perspectives on the globalization of modern technologies and shows us that to truly understand what modernity became, we need to look at the everyday experiences of people in all walks of life, taking stock of how they repurposed small technologies to reinvent their world and themselves.

 

Arnold, David - 02 - Südasien (Neue Fischer Weltgeschichte Band 11)

Südasien 
Südasien (Neue Fischer Weltgeschichte Band 11)

David Arnold (author) and Michael Bischoff (translator), Frankfurt am Main, S. Fischer Verlag, 2011

The Indian subcontinent is treated in its entire history in Volume 11 of this new Fischer world history. The prestigious British India specialist David Arnold objectively portrays the cutting edge of historical research, considering the times of unrest, centuries-old traditions, and revolutionary movements of power and religious quarrels that have repeatedly devastated the Indian subcontinent.

 

 
 

Arnold, David - 03 - A History of India (Second Edition)

A History of India 
A History of India (Second Edition), Blackwell History of the World

Burton Stein (author) and David Arnold (editor), Wiley-Blackwell 2010

This new edition of Burton Stein′s classic A History of India builds on the success of the original to provide an updated narrative of the development of Indian society, culture, and politics from 7000 BC to the present. New edition of Burton Stein’s classic text provides a narrative from 7000 BC up to the twenty–first century Includes updated and extended coverage of the modern period, with a new chapter covering the death of Nehru in 1964 to the present Expands coverage of India′s internal political and economic development, and its wider diplomatic role in the region Features a new introduction, updated glossary and further reading sections, and numerous figures, photographs and fully revised maps.

 
 

Arnold, David - 04 - The Tropics and the Traveling Gaze: India, Landscape, and Science 1800-1856

tropicstravellinggaze.jpg 
The Tropics and the Traveling Gaze: India, Landscape, and Science 1800-1856

David Arnold, University of Washington Post, 2006

This is a book about land. It is about a land -- about India and how that vast and diverse region came to be known to, and conceptualized by, British and other European travelers and observers in the first half of the nineteenth century. But it is also a book about the land, about the ways in which India's material environment became increasingly subject to the colonial understanding of landscape and nature, and to the scientific scrutiny of itinerant naturalists. It is concerned with European responses to an unfamiliar landscape, about the land as an object of colonial fear and desire, utility and aesthetics. It seeks to show how India, in passing under British control, was evaluated in ways that combined scenic delight and practical opportunity with a harsher appraisal of India as a land of death and disease, of desolation and deficiency.

 

Arnold, David - 05 - Telling Lives in India: Biography, Autobiography, and Life History

Telling Lives in India 
Telling Lives in India: Biography, Autobiography, and Life History

David Arnold and Stuart H Blackburn (editors), Indiana University Press 2004

Life histories have a wide, if not universal, appeal. But what does it mean to narrate the story of a life, whether one's own or someone else's, orally or in writing? Which lives are worth telling, and who is authorized to tell them? The essays in this volume consider these questions through close examination of a wide range of biographies, autobiographies, diaries, and oral stories from India. Their subjects range from literary authors to housewives, politicians to folk heroes, and include young and old, women and men, the illiterate and the learned. The contributors are David Arnold, Stuart Blackburn, Sudipta Kaviraj, Barbara D. Metcalf, Kirin Narayan, Francesca Orsini, Jonathan P. Parry, Jean-Luc Racine, Josiane Racine, David Shulman, and Sylvia Vatuk.

 

 

Arnold, David - 06 - The Age of Discovery, 1400-1600 (Second Edition)

The Age of Discovery 
The Age of Discovery, 1400-1600 (Second Edition)

David Arnold, Routledge, 2002

The Age of Discovery explores one of the most dramatic features of the late medieval and early modern period: when voyagers from Western Europe led by Spain and Portugal set out across the world and established links with Africa, Asia and the Americas. This book examines the main motivations behind the voyages and discusses the developments in navigation expertise and technology that made them possible.

This second edition brings the scholarship up to date and includes two new chapters on the important topics of the idea of "discovery" and on biological and environmental factors which favoured or limited European expansion.

 

 

Arnold, David - 07 - Gandhi: Profiles in Power

gandhi.jpg 
Gandhi: Profiles in Power

David Arnold, Longman, 2001

Gandhi's is an extraordinary and compelling story. Few individuals in history have made so great a mark upon their times. And yet Gandhi never held high political office, commanded no armies and was not even a compelling orator. His 'power' therefore makes a particularly fascinating subject for investigation. David Arnold explains how and why the shy student and affluent lawyer became one of the most powerful anti-colonial figures Western empires in Asia ever faced and why he aroused such intense affection, loyalty (and at times much bitter hatred) among Indians and Westerners alike. Attaching as much influence to the idea and image of Gandhi as to the man himself, Arnold sees Gandhi not just as a Hindu saint but as a colonial subject, whose attitudes and experiences expressed much that was common to countless others in India and elsewhere who sought to grapple with the overwhelming power and cultural authority of the West.

 

Arnold, David - 08 - Science, Technology and Medicine in Colonial India

science_technology_and_medicine.jpg 
Science, Technology and Medicine in Colonial India

David Arnold, CUP, 2000

Interest in the science, technology and medicine of India under British rule has increased in recent years and has played an important part in the reinterpretation of modern South Asian history. David Arnold's wide-ranging analysis combines a discussion of all three fields across the entire colonial period--from the 1860s through to Independence--offering both a survey of recent scholarship and an original overview. Arnold assesses the role of science in the making of colonial India and in the fashioning of Indian responses to British rule.
 
 
 
 
Arnold, David - 09 - Nature, Culture, Imperialism: Essays on the Environmental History of South Asia

Nature Culture Imperialism 
Nature, Culture, Imperialism: Essays on the Environmental History of South Asia

David Arnold and Ramachandra Guha (editors), OUP India 1997

Environmental history is a fast developing field of critical enquiry. In both ecological and cultural terms. South Asia is characterized by an unparalleled diversity. Ecological degradation, and the social conflicts that have come in its wake, have further underlined the need for historical research in this field.

 

 

 

 

Arnold, David - 10 - The Problem of Nature: Environment, Culture and European Expansion

problem_of_nature.jpg 
The Problem of Nature: Environment, Culture and European Expansion

David Arnold, Wiley-Blackwell, 1996

This book considers how nature – in both its biological and environmental manifestations – has been invoked as a dynamic force in human history. It shows how historians, philosophers, geographers, anthropologists and scientists have used ideas of nature to explain the evolution of cultures, to understand cultural difference, and to justify or condemn colonization, slavery and racial superiority. It examines the central part that ideas of environmental and biological determinism have played in theory, and describes how these ideas have served in different ways at different times as instruments of authority, identity and defiance. The book shows how powerful and problematic the invocation of nature can be.

 

 

 

Arnold, David - 11 - Warm Climates and Western Medicine: Emergence of Tropical Medicine, 1500-1900

Warm Climates and Western Medicine 
Warm Climates and Western Medicine: Emergence of Tropical Medicine, 1500-1900

Clio Medica/Wellcome Institute Series in the History of Medicine

David Arnold (editor), Rodopi 1996

 

 

 

 

 

Arnold, David - 12 - Institutions and Ideologies: A SOAS South Asia Reader

Institutions and Ideologies 
Institutions and Ideologies: A SOAS South Asia Reader

David Arnold and Peter Robb (editors), Routledge 1995

 

 

 

 

 

 
 

Arnold, David - 13 - Subaltern Studies: Writings on South Asian History and Society, Vol. 8: Essays in Honour of Ranajit Guha

Subaltern Studies VIII 
Subaltern Studies: Writings on South Asian History and Society, Vol. 8: Essays in Honour of Ranajit Guha

David Arnold and David Hardiman (editors), Oxford University Press, New Delhi 1994

Subaltern Studies began as a revisionist historiography of peasantmovements in colonial India. The Subaltern Studies group was formed in1979-80 under the tutelage of the historian Ranajit Guha at the University of Sussex in England. The first volume of subaltern studies was published in1982.

In this eighth volume, the essays take up themes from the writings of Ranajit Guha. They link subaltern experience and mentality in India with colonial knowledge and power as well as with the culture and politics of the country's elite population.

 

Arnold, David - 14 - Colonizing the Body: State Medicine and Epidemic Disease in Nineteenth-Century India

Colonizing the Body 
Colonizing the Body: State Medicine and Epidemic Disease in Nineteenth-Century India

David Arnold, University of California Press, 1993

In this innovative analysis of medicine and disease in colonial India, David Arnold explores the vital role of the state in medical and public health activities, arguing that Western medicine became a critical battleground between the colonized and the colonizers. Focusing on three major epidemic diseases - smallpox, cholera, and plague - Arnold analyzes the impact of medical interventionism. He demonstrates that Western medicine as practiced in India was not simply transferred from West to East, but was also fashioned in response to local needs and Indian conditions. By emphasizing this colonial dimension of medicine, Arnold highlights the centrality of the body to political authority in British India and shows how medicine both influenced and articulated the intrinsic contradictions of colonial rule.

 

Arnold, David - 15 - Famine: Social Crisis and Historical Change

Famine 
Famine: Social Crisis and Historical Change

David Arnold, Wiley-Blackwell, 1988

In this original and timely work, David Arnold draws upon the history of Asia, Africa, Latin America and Europe, to explain the origins and characteristics of famine. He considers whether some societies are more vulnerable to famine than others, and contests the assumption that those affected by famine are simply passive ′victims′. He compares the ways in which individuals and states have responded to the threat of mass starvation, and the relation of famine to political and social power.

 

 

 

 

Arnold, David - 16 - Imperial Medicine and Indigenous Societies

Imperial Medicine and Indigenous Societies 
Imperial Medicine and Indigenous Societies

David Arnold (editor), Manchester University Press 1988

Revised versions of papers presented at a conference held by the Society for the Social History of Medicine at the University of Aston, UK, April 1986, on the breadth and variety of imperial experiences in the colonies.

 

 

 

 
 

Arnold, David - 17 - Police Power and Colonial Rule: Madras 1859-1947

Police Power and Colonial Rule 
Police Power and Colonial Rule: Madras 1859-1947

David Arnold, Oxford University Press, 1987

Focusing on developments in the Madras presidency between the Rebellion of 1857-58 and independence 90 years later, this book studies the creation of a British constabulary in India as a powerful coercive tool of British colonialism. The author targets the use of police force against dacoits, nationalists, adivasi hillmen, and urban proletariats, and reveals, through the organization and social composition of the constabulary, how internally as well as externally, the police force mirrored the underlying character of the colonial system as a whole.

 

 

 

Arnold, David - 18 - The Congress in Tamilnad: Nationalist Politics in South India, 1919-1937

The Congress in Tamilnad 
The Congress in Tamilnad: Nationalist Politics in South India, 1919-1937

David Arnold, South Asia Books, 1977

 

 

 

 

 

 
 

B

Butters, Humfrey - 01 - Governors and Government in Early Sixteenth-Century Florence 1502-1519

Governors and Government 
Governors and Government in Early Sixteenth-Century Florence 1502-1519

Humfrey Butters, OUP 2001

When Piero Soderino was elected to the new office of Gonfalonier of Justice in 1502, he was faced not only with the problem of foreign invasions of italy but also with a controversial new constitution based on a Great Council of over 3,000 members. With the return of the Medici in 1512, the earlier constitutional order was restored--one that was far more oligarchical, and much less satisfactory, for many Florentines. This book provides a lively account of political alignments and decision making in these two contrasting governments, and analyzes the causes and significance of the Medici overthrow of the popular government of Soderino. Butters also reveals both the skills and shortcomings of the governments' leaders and the impact of the Medici pope, Leo X, on the city's affairs.

 

C

Capp, Bernard - 01 - The Ties That Bind: Siblings, Family and Society in Early Modern England

The Ties That Bind 
The Ties That Bind: Siblings, Family and Society in Early Modern England

Bernard Capp, OUP Oxford, 2018

The family is a major area of scholarly research and public debate. Many studies have explored the English family in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, focusing on husbands and wives, parents and children. The Ties that Bind explores in depth the other key dimension: the place of brothers and sisters in family life, and in society.

Moralists urged mutual love and support between siblings, but recognized that sibling rivalry was a common and potent force. The widespread practice of primogeniture made England distinctive. The eldest son inherited most of the estate and with it, a moral obligation to advance the welfare of his brothers and sisters. The Ties that Bind explores how this operated in practice, and shows how the resentment of younger brothers and sisters made sibling relationships a heated issue in this period, in family life, in print, and also on the stage.

 

Capp, Bernard - 02 - England's Culture Wars: Puritan Reformation and its Enemies in the Interregnum, 1649-1660

England 
England's Culture Wars: Puritan Reformation and its Enemies in the Interregnum, 1649-1660

Bernard Capp, OUP 2012

Following the execution of the king in 1649, the new Commonwealth and then Oliver Cromwell set out to drive forward a puritan reformation of manners. They wanted to reform the church and its services, enforce the Sabbath, suppress Christmas, and spread the gospel. They sought to impose a stern moral discipline to regulate and reform sexual behaviour, drinking practices, language, dress, and leisure activities ranging from music and plays to football.

England's Culture Wars explores how far this agenda could be enforced, especially in urban communities which offered the greatest potential to build a godly civic commonwealth. How far were local magistrates and ministers willing to cooperate, and what coercive powers did the regime possess to silence or remove dissidents? How far did the reformers themselves wish to go, and how did they reconcile godly reformation with the demands of decency and civility? Music and dancing lived on, in genteel contexts, early opera replaced the plays now forbidden, and puritans themselves were often fond of hunting and hawking. Bernard Capp explores the propaganda wars waged in press and pulpit, how energetically reformation was pursued, and how much or little was achieved. Many recent historians have dismissed interregnum reformation as a failure. He demonstrates that while the reforming drive varied enormously from place to place, its impact could be powerful. The book is therefore structured in three parts: setting out the reform agenda and challenges, surveying general issues and patterns, and finally offering a number of representative case-studies. It draws on a wide range of sources, including local and central government records, judicial records, pamphlets, sermons, newspapers, diaries, letters, and memoirs; and demonstrates how court records by themselves give us only a very limited picture of what was happening on the ground.

 

Capp, Bernard - 03 - When Gossips Meet: Women, Family, and Neighbourhood in Early Modern England

When Gossips Meet: Women, Family, and Neighbourhood in Early Modern England 
When Gossips Meet: Women, Family, and Neighbourhood in Early Modern England

Bernard Capp, OUP 2003

This book explores how women of the poorer and middling sorts in early modern England negotiated a patriarchal culture in which they were generally excluded, marginalized, or subordinated. It focuses on the networks of close friends ('gossips') which gave them a social identity beyond the narrowly domestic, providing both companionship and practical support in disputes with husbands and with neighbours of either sex.

The book also examines the micropolitics of the household, with its internal alliances and feuds, and women's agency in neighbourhood politics, exercised by shaping local public opinion, exerting pressure on parish officials, and through the role of informal female juries. If women did not openly challenge male supremacy, they could often play a significant role in shaping their own lives and the life of the local community.

 

Capp, Bernard - 04 - The World of John Taylor the Water-Poet 1578-1653

The World of John Taylor the Water-Poet 1578-1653 
The World of John Taylor the Water-Poet 1578-1653

Bernard Capp, OUP 1994

This is the first full study of a self-educated popular writer who carved out a pioneering role for himself as a `media celebrity' and became a national institution. Taylor chronicled his adventurous life and passed judgement on his age in a stream of shrewd and witty pamphlets, poems, and essays. His writings allow us to piece together the world of a London waterman over the space of forty years, from the reign of James I to the aftermath of the civil war. His ready wit, restless ambition and bonhomie soon made him a well-known figure in the Jacobean literary world and at the royal court. Claiming the fictitious office of `the King's Water-Poet', he fashioned a way of life that straddled the elite and popular worlds. Taylor published his thoughts - always trenchant - on everything from politics to needlework, from poetry to inland navigation, from religion and social criticism to bawdy jests. He was a more complex and contradictory figure than is often asumed: both hedonist and moralist, a cavalier and staunch Anglican with a puritanical taste for sermons and for armed struggle against the popish antichrist. He embodies many of the contradictions of a world that was soon to be, all to literally, at war with itself.

 

Capp, Bernard - 05 - Cromwell's Navy: The Fleet and the English Revolution, 1648-1660: The Fleet and the English Revolution, 1648-60

Cromwell 
Cromwell's Navy: The Fleet and the English Revolution, 1648-1660: The Fleet and the English Revolution, 1648-60

Bernard Capp, OUP 1989

This is the first study of the navy during the English Revolution. It argues that the commonwealth navy did not, as is often assumed, stand back from domestic political controversies, but was deeply influenced by the revolutionary circumstances of its origins.

Bernard Capp charts the navy's central role in the struggle to win recognition for the new regime, and in the major wars which followed. Based on extensive and meticulous research, this book provides a richly detailed insight into a neglected subject, and enhances our understanding of the Cromwellian period as a whole.

 

English Almanacs 1500-1800 - Astrology & the Popular Press 
English Almanacs 1500-1800: Astrology & the Popular Press

Bernard Capp, Faber 1979

Apart from the Bible, almanacs were the most influential and widely dispersed for of literature in Tudor and Stuart England. At their zenith in the later seventeenth century, they sold at a rate of 400,000 copies a year. They were read by many people who read little else, and the works of Shakespeare and Jonson, among others, have numerous references to them. Professor Capp's fascinating book (Faber, 1979) is the first to study their history in depth. It is full of vivid detail, and shows clearly how relevant they were to almost every aspect of life, social, intellectual, religious, political. As well as being a powerful force in revolutionary times, they played a central part in spreading scientific progress and medical learning, and in the development of popular journalism and printing.

Possessing some of the characteristics of both pocket encyclopaedia and sermon, they conveyed information and/or moral commentary on such diverse topics as attitudes to rich and poor, agriculture, gardening, weights and measures, food , drink, sex, sleep, dress, bodily cleanliness, games, fairs, holidays, the weather, the state of the roads, posts, freemasonry, omens, witchcraft, will-making and even the sale of wives - in addition to making dramatic astrological prophecies about the likelihood of plague, famine and war in the year ahead.

 

Capp, Bernard - 07 - The Fifth Monarchy Men: A Study in Seventeenth-Century English Millenarianism

The Fifth Monarchy Men 
The Fifth Monarchy Men: A Study in Seventeenth-Century English Millenarianism

Bernard Capp, Faber 1972

In The Fifth Monarchy Men (Faber, 1972), Professor Capp places the movement in the context of the rise of millenarian thought in Europe from the Reformation and its rapid spread in England during the Civil Wars. For many radicals, the execution of King Charles cleared the way for King Jesus, and heralded the establishment of a revolutionary millennium. The apparent apostasy of the Rump Parliament and Oliver Cromwell channelled part of the wave of millenarian feeling into the formation of a specific sect. This first comprehensive study of the Fifth Monarchists movement traces its history and examines its social, political, legal and religious proposals. Although it had the support of some gentry and army officers, it was essentially an urban movement of artisans, apprentices, and even labourers, reaching lower down the social scale than any contemporary radical movement, with the possible exception of the Diggers. Professor Capp discusses its structure, and its relationship to other revolutionary sects, notably the Levellers and Quakers. He analyses the social, political and economic programmes of the self-styled saints which, though revolutionary, were elitist rather than equalitarian. The Fifth Monarchists' militant foreign policy was shaped by the twofold consideration of exporting the revolution and of strengthening the position of English trade. Their much-derided call for the re-establishment of the Mosaic Code is the culmination of a long tradition of such thinking amongst Puritan and earlier writers. Appendices provide biographies of almost 280 Fifth Monarchists and the location of all known Fifth Monarchist groups.

 

Cohn, Henry - 01 - Government in Reformation Europe 1520-60

Government in Reformation Europe 1520-60 
Government in Reformation Europe 1520-60

Henry Cohn (editor), MacMillan 1971

 

 

 

 

 

Cohn, Henry - 02 - The Government of the Rhine Palatinate in the Fifteenth Century

The Government of the Rhine Palatinate in the Fifteenth CenturyDie Herrschaft in der Pfalz am Rhein im 15. Jahrhundert 
The Government of the Rhine Palatinate in the Fifteenth Century

Henry Cohn, Oxford University Press 1965

 
Die Herrschaft in der Pfalz am Rhein im 15. Jahrhundert (German edition)

Henry Cohn, 2013

 

 

 

D

Dusinberre, William - 01 - Strategies for Survival: Recollections of Bondage in Antebellum Virginia

Strategies for Survival 
Strategies for Survival: Recollections of Bondage in Antebellum Virginia

William Dusinberre, University of Virginia Press 2009

Strategies for Survival conveys the experience of bondage through the words of former slaves themselves. The interviews—conducted in Virginia in 1937 by WPA interviewers—are considered among the most valuable of the WPA interviews because in Virginia the interviewers were almost all African Americans; thus the interviewees almost certainly spoke more frankly than they would otherwise have done. Dusinberre uses the interviews to assess the strategies by which slaves sought to survive, despite the severe constrictions bondage imposed upon their lives. Religion and escape were common means of coping with the indignity of family disruption, contempt, and the harsh realities of slavery. However, while Dusinberre recognizes the creativity and variety of slaves' responses to oppression, he acknowledges the dispiriting realities of the limits of slave resistance and agency.

 

Dusinberre, William - 02 - Slavemaster President: The Double Career of James Polk

Slavemaster President 
Slavemaster President: The Double Career of James Polk

William Dusinberre, Oxford University Press 2003

James Polk was President of the United States from 1845 to 1849, a time when slavery began to dominate American politics. Polk's presidency coincided with the eruption of the territorial slavery issue, which within a few years would lead to the catastrophe of the Civil War. Polk himself owned substantial cotton plantations-- in Tennessee and later in Mississippi-- and some 50 slaves. Unlike many antebellum planters who portrayed their involvement with slavery as a historical burden bestowed onto them by their ancestors, Polk entered the slave business of his own volition, for reasons principally of financial self-interest. Drawing on previously unexplored records, Slavemaster President recreates the world of Polk's plantation and the personal histories of his slaves, in what is arguably the most careful and vivid account to date of how slavery functioned on a single cotton plantation. Life at the Polk estate was brutal and often short. Fewer than one in two slave children lived to the age of fifteen, a child mortality rate even higher than that on the average plantation. A steady stream of slaves temporarily fled the plantation throughout Polk's tenure as absentee slavemaster. Yet Polk was in some respects an enlightened owner, instituting an unusual incentive plan for his slaves and granting extensive privileges to his most favored slave. Startlingly, Dusinberre shows how Polk sought to hide from public knowledge the fact that, while he was president, he was secretly buying as many slaves as his plantation revenues permitted. Shortly before his sudden death from cholera, the president quietly drafted a new will, in which he expressed the hope that his slaves might be freed--but only after he and his wife were both dead. The very next day, he authorized the purchase, in strictest secrecy, of six more very young slaves. By contrast with Senator John C. Calhoun, President Polk has been seen as a moderate Southern Democratic leader. But Dusinberre suggests that the president's political stance toward slavery-- influenced as it was by his deep personal involvement in the plantation system-- may actually have helped precipitate the Civil War that Polk sought to avoid.

 

Dusinberre, William - 03 - Them Dark Days: Slavery in the American Rice Swamps

Them Dark Days 
Them Dark Days: Slavery in the American Rice Swamps

William Dusinberre, Oxford University Press 1996

In this groundbreaking book, Dusinberre conducts an intense investigation of slavery in the rice swamps of South Carolina and Georgia. Concentrated there were some of the richest--and most expansive--plantations of the South. It was an unhealthy region for both blacks and whites; slavery, in the swamps, was administered with particular severity. Focusing on three of the largest plantations, Dusinberre presents portraits of individuals, both black and white, who personify and exemplify the harsh realities of the slave system. Them Dark Days offers a vivid reconstruction of slavery in action; while it conveys the atmosphere and daily routine of the plantations, it also sets the analysis of slave culture within a wider context of health, discipline, privilege, and psychology.

 
 

Dusinberre, William - 04 - Henry Adams: The Myth of Failure

Henry Adams: The Myth of Failure 
Henry Adams: The Myth of Failure

William Dusinberre, University of Virginia Press 1988

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dusinberre, William - 05 - Civil War Issues in Philadelphia, 1856-1865

Civil War Issues in Philadelphia 
Civil War Issues in Philadelphia, 1856-1865

William Dusinberre, Pennsylvania University Press and Oxford University Press, 1965

 

 

 

 

 

H

Hardiman, David - 01 - The Nonviolent Struggle for Indian Freedom, 1905-19

The Nonviolent Struggle for Indian Freedom, 1905-19 
The Nonviolent Struggle for Indian Freedom, 1905-19

David Hardiman, C Hurst & Co Publishers Ltd, 2018

Much of the recent surge in writing about the practice of nonviolent forms of resistance has focused on movements that occurred after the end of the Second World War, many of which have been extremely successful. Although the fact that such a method of resistance was developed in its modern form by Indians is acknowledged in this writing, there has not until now been an authoritative history of the role of Indians in the evolution of the phenomenon. Celebrated historian David Hardiman shows that while nonviolence is associated above all with the towering figure of Mahatma Gandhi, ‘passive resistance’ was already being practised by nationalists in British-ruled India, though there was no principled commitment to nonviolence as such. It was Gandhi, first in South Africa and then in India, who evolved a technique that he called ‘satyagraha’. His endeavours saw ‘nonviolence’ forged as both a new word in the English language, and a new political concept. This book conveys in vivid detail exactly what nonviolence entailed, and the formidable difficulties that the pioneers of such resistance encountered in the years 1905-19.
 

Hardiman, David - 02 - Medical Marginality in South Asia: Situating Subaltern Therapeutics

Medical Marginality in South Asia 
Medical Marginality in South Asia: Situating Subaltern Therapeutics

David Hardiman and Projit Bihari Mukharji, Routledge 2012

Examining the world of popular healing in South Asia, this book looks at the way that it is marginalised by the state and medical establishment while at the same time being very important in the everyday lives of the poor. It describes and analyses a world of ‘subaltern therapeutics’ that both interacts with and resists state-sanctioned and elite forms of medical practice. The relationship is seen as both a historical as well as ongoing one.

Focusing on those who exist and practice in the shadow of statist medicine, the book discusses the many ways in which they try to heal a range of maladies, and how they experience their marginality. The contributors also provide a history of such therapeutics, in the process challenging the widespread belief that such ‘traditional’ therapeutics are relatively static and unchanging. In focusing on these problems of transition, they open up one of the central concerns of subaltern historiography. This is an important contribution to the history of medicine and society, and subaltern and South Asian studies.

 

Hardiman, David - 03 - Missionaries and their Medicine: A Christian Modernity for Tribal India

Missionaries and their Medicine 
Missionaries and their Medicine: A Christian Modernity for Tribal India

David Hardiman, Manchester University Press 2008

Missionaries and their Medicine is a lucid and enthralling study of the encounter between Christian missionaries and an Indian tribal community, the Bhils, in the period 1880 to 1964. The study is informed by a deep knowledge of the people among whom the missionaries worked, the author having lived for extensive periods in the tribal tracts of western India. He argues that the Bhils were never the passive objects of missionary attention and that they created for themselves their own form of "Christian modernity."

The book provides a major intervention in the history of colonial medicine, as Hardiman argues that missionary medicine had a specific quality of its own -- which he describes and analyzes in detail -- and that in most cases it was preferred to the medicine of colonial states. He also examines the period of transition to Indian independence, which was a highly fraught and uncertain process for the missionaries.

 

Hardiman, David - 04 - Histories for the Subordinated

Histories for the Subordinated 
Histories for the Subordinated

David Hardiman, Permanent Black, New Delhi 2006, and Seagull Books, New York 2007

Histories for the Subordinated brings together the key writings of David Hardiman, one of the foremost contemporary historians of the subcontinent. Hardiman´s practice as a historian - his enormously rich empiricism, archival work, and fieldwork, as well as his clarity - has been an inspiration to many, even as it has implicitly questioned some of the fashionably arcane modes of history-writing.

Ranging across politics, environmental issues, Gandhi, moneylending, disease, and subaltern history, the book will interest all serious readers of Indian history as well as scholars in the areas of politics, sociology, culture, and religion in modern India.

 

Hardiman, David - 05 - Healing Bodies, Saving Souls: Medical Missions in Asia and Africa (Clio Medica 80)

Healing Bodies, Saving Souls 
Healing Bodies, Saving Souls: Medical Missions in Asia and Africa (Clio Medica 80)

David Hardiman (editor), Rodopi, Amsterdam and New York 2006

Missionary medicine flourished during the period of high European imperialism, from the late-1800s to the 1960s. Although the figure of mission doctor - exemplified by David Livingstone and Albert Schweitzer - exercised a powerful influence on the Western imagination during the nineteenth and early-twentieth centuries, few historians have examined the history of this important aspect of the missionary movement. This collection of articles on Asia and Africa uses the extensive archives that exist on medical missions to both enrich and challenge existing histories of the clinic in colonial territories whether of the dispensary, the hospital, the maternity home or leprosy asylum. Some of the major themes addressed within include the attitude of different Christian denominations towards medical mission work, their differing theories and practices, how the missionaries were drawn into contentious local politics, and their attitude towards supernatural cures. Leprosy, often a feature of such work, is explored, as well as the ways in which local people perceived disease, healing and the missionaries themselves. Also discussed is the important contribution of women towards mission medical work. Healing Bodies, Saving Souls will be of interest not only to students and historians but also the wider reader as it aims to define the place of missionary within the overall history of medicine.

 

Hardiman, David - 06 - Gandhi in His Time and Ours: The Global Legacy of His Ideas

Gandhi in His Time and Ours 
Gandhi in His Time and Ours: The Global Legacy of His Ideas

David Hardiman, Permanent Black, New Delhi, 2003; Hurst, London, Columbia University Press, New York and Natal University Press, Durban 2004

Gandhi was the creator of a radical style of politics that has proved effective in fighting insidious social divisions within India and elsewhere in the world. How did this new form of politics come about? David Hardiman shows that it was based on a larger vision of an alternative society, one that emphasized mutual respect, resistance to exploitation, nonviolence, and ecological harmony.

Politics was just one of the many directions in which Gandhi sought to activate this peculiarly personal vision, and its practice involved experiments in relation to his opponents. From representatives of the British Raj to Indian advocates of violent resistance, from right-wing religious leaders to upholders of caste privilege, Gandhi confronted entrenched groups and their even more entrenched ideologies with a deceptively simple ethic of resistance. Hardiman examines Gandhi's ways of conducting his conflicts with all these groups, as well as with his critics on the left and representatives of the Dalits. He also explores another key issue in Gandhi's life and legacy: his ideas about and attitudes toward women.

Despite inconsistencies and limitations, and failures in his personal life, Gandhi has become a beacon for posterity. The uncompromising honesty of his politics and moral activism has inspired such figures as Jayaprakash Narayan, Medha Patkar, Martin Luther King Jr., Nelson Mandela, and Petra Kelly and influenced a series of new social movements -- by environmentalists, antiwar campaigners, feminists, and human rights activists, among others -- dedicated to the principle of a more just world.

 

Hardiman, David - 07 - Feeding the Baniya: Peasants and Usurers in Western India

Feeding the Baniya 
Feeding the Baniya: Peasants and Usurers in Western India

David Hardiman, Oxford University Press, New Delhi, 1996

This book provides important insights into a relationship which has been crucial to life in rural India--that between peasants and usurers. It explores the relationship in a rounded way, examining how states extended support to usurers, as well as how Baniyas exerted a power that was both economic and ideological.

 

 

 

 

Hardiman, David - 08 - Subaltern Studies: Writings on South Asian History and Society, Vol. 8: Essays in Honour of Ranajit Guha

Subaltern Studies VIII 
Subaltern Studies: Writings on South Asian History and Society, Vol. 8: Essays in Honour of Ranajit Guha

David Arnold and David Hardiman (editors), Oxford University Press, New Delhi 1994

Subaltern Studies began as a revisionist historiography of peasantmovements in colonial India. The Subaltern Studies group was formed in1979-80 under the tutelage of the historian Ranajit Guha at the University of Sussex in England. The first volume of subaltern studies was published in1982.

In this eighth volume, the essays take up themes from the writings of Ranajit Guha. They link subaltern experience and mentality in India with colonial knowledge and power as well as with the culture and politics of the country's elite population.

 

Hardiman, David - 09 - Peasant Resistance in India 1858-1914

Peasant Resistance in India 1858-1914 
Peasant Resistance in India 1858-1914

David Hardiman (editor), Oxford University Press, New Delhi 1992

This collection of essays focuses on a period when several disparate and localized struggles occurred which are significant in revealing wider unities that existed among the peasantry. David Hardiman first traces changing trends in the way the peasantry has been viewed by historians, from the colonial era to recent times. He then emphasizes the "community" consciousness of peasants, which is then redefined within the context of their specific struggles. He thus demarcates particular areas of resistance based on specific relationships of domination and subordination, each with a distinct character and chronology. Each localized, isolated resistance is thus unified in being directed against those outside the peasant community.

 

 
 

Hardiman, David - 10 - The Coming of the Devi: Adivasi Assertion in Western India

The Coming of the Devi 
The Coming of the Devi: Adivasi Assertion in Western India

David Hardiman, Oxford University Press, New Delhi 1987

In 1922, the adivasis of western India were commanded by a goddess--or Devi--to change their established way of life. Their collective efforts to obey this goddess quickly brought them into conflict with the locally dominant class of landlords and liquor dealers. In this pioneering study, Hardiman offers a detailed treatment of a religious movement that was transformed into a struggle for adivasi assertion.

 

 

 

 

Hardiman, David - 11 - Peasant Nationalists of Gujarat: Kheda District, 1917-34

Peasant Nationalists of Gujarat 
Peasant Nationalists of Gujarat: Kheda District, 1917-34

David Hardiman, Oxford University Press, New Delhi 1981

David Hardiman turns to the 'self-assertion' of the Patidars as a community and 'the liberation of the peasantry from colonial rule' as explanations for the commitment of the prosperous, landholding central Gujarati peasantry to active political struggle.

 

 

 

 

 

Hennessy, Alistair - 01 - The Fractured Blockade: West-European-Cuban Relations During the Revolution

The Fractured Blockade 
The Fractured Blockade: West-European-Cuban Relations During the Revolution

Alistair Hennessy and George Lambie (editors), Macmillan 1993

The first book in the "Warwick University Caribbean Studies" series to concentrate on Cuba, this volume does so at a moment when the Revolution faces its most serious crisis since 1959. The hypothesis is - without West-European links, the Revolution might well have floundered. Refusing to submit to US pressures to cut links with Cuba, West European powers made a significant and hitherto largely unacknowledged contribution to the Revolution's survival. the links between Cuba, Britain and Spain, the three powers in detail, were not due to ideological affinities, but to commercial pragmatism and to a different perception from the US as to the nature of radical nationalist movements. This is discussed, as well as those European ideas which have contributed towards the Revolution's ideology. However, the main chapters of the book concentrate on diplomatic, economic and commercial relations and include contributions by British, US and Cuban specialists. The epilogue considers future scenarios and the dilemma facing Cuba in the "New International Order".

 

Hennessy, Alistair - 02 - The Autobiography of a Runaway Slave

The Autobiography of a Runaway Slave 
The Autobiography of a Runaway Slave

Esteban Montejo (author) and Alistair Hennessy (editor), Macmillan 1993

The recorded memoirs of a 105-year-old Cuban black ex-slave, this book includes a bibliographical essay, intended to enable readers and students to study the Cuban historical literary and social background, and to put the book into the wider contest of other life-histories.

 

 

 

 

Hennessy, Alistair - 03 - Intellectuals in the Twentieth-Century Caribbean - Volume II

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Intellectuals in the Twentieth-Century Caribbean - Volume II

Unity in Variety: The Hispanic and Francophone Caribbean

Alistair Hennessy (editor), Macmillan 1992

This is the second of two volumes analyzing the past, present and future roles of intellectuals in the 20th century from a pan-Caribbean perspective. This volume covers the Spanish and French countries, identifying the influences which mark off their intellectual traditions from those of English-speaking countries.

 

Hennessy, Alistair - 04 - Intellectuals in the Twentieth-Century Caribbean - Volume I

Intellectuals in the Twentieth-Century Caribbean - Volume I 
Intellectuals in the Twentieth-Century Caribbean - Volume I

Spectre of the New Class: The Commonwealth Caribbean

Alistair Hennessy (editor), Macmillan 1992

This is the first of two volumes analyzing the past, present and future roles of intellectuals in the 20th century from a pan-Caribbean perspective. Changes in both technology and international relations have called into question the traditional function of intellectuals. The rise of a technical intelligentsia in the post-industrial world, controlling new technologies of communication pose challenges and have thrown up a range of problems. This book analyzes the issues that have been of concern to Caribbean intellectuals reflected in creole and plural society as well as on theories of development. Among specific thinkers discussed are Eric Williams, Walter Rodney and C.L.R. James. The role of the diaspora and of science is also discussed and questions for the future are posed.

 

Hennessy, Alistair - 05 - The Land That England Lost: Argentina and Britain, a Special Relationship

The Land that England Lost 
The Land That England Lost: Argentina and Britain, a Special Relationship

Alistair Hennessy and John King (editors), I. B. Tauris 1992

This collection of essays covers Britain's relationship with Argentina from the 19th century, when Argentina formed part of Britain's "informal empire", up until the Falklands War and its aftermath. Among the subjects covered are: the role of Argentina in the "informal empire"; British capital in Argentina; the decline of the connection and the rise of Peron; British emigration and settlement; culture, literature and dance; the press and the Perons; the Antarctic dimension; the Falklands War and its aftermath; and the future of the relationship.

 

 

 

Hennessy, Alistair - 06 - The Frontier in Latin American History

The Frontier in Latin American History 
The Frontier in Latin American History

Alistair Hennessy, University of New Mexico 1978

Alistair Hennessy has approached his task - a synthetic history of the frontier experience in Latin America - with a clear understanding of the variety of Latin American cultures and historical determinants. He has established a unifying pattern for the history of Latin America while retaining necessary detail and preserving the sense of kalaedoscopic variety of that vast area. In this pioneering work of synthesis he has succeeded in his aim of bringing coherence from the mass of studies pertaining to the frontiers of several colonial ventures and twenty republics over their four-and-a-half centuries of history.

This is the most useful comparison to date of the frontiers in the various Americas. Although the author relies most heavily on works in English, he makes excellent use of a wide variety of secondary materials in Spanish, Portuguese and French. Indeed, the other virtues of the book aside, the bibliography will be of great value to the teacher or layman attempting to make better sense from the labyrinth of Latin American history.

 

Hennessy, Alistair - 07 - Modern Spain

Modern Spain 
Modern Spain, Historical Association Pamphlet No.59

Alistair Hennessy, 1965

 

 

 

 

 

Hennessy, Alistair - 08 - The Federal Republic in Spain: Pi y Margall and the Federal Republican Movement, 1868-74

The Federal Republic in Spain 
The Federal Republic in Spain: Pi y Margall and the Federal Republican Movement, 1868-74

Alistair Hennessy, Greenwood Press 1962

Whatever problems faced European powers in the nineteenth and early twentieth century they were scarcely those posed by a widening gap between the political and real life of the country, by the adjustment to loss of empire and the constant drain of a rebellious colony as in Cuba, by a militant clerical party aiming to re-create an idyllic Catholic past, by a spoils system which pervaded all branches of public life, and by an overstaffed bureaucratic army whose officers were promoted for political services rather than military efficiency--factors which, taken with the country's poverty and its small middle class, made the establishment of stable parliamentary government impossible.

 

Heuman, Gad - 01 - The Routledge History of Slavery

The Routledge History of Slavery 
The Routledge History of Slavery

Gad Heuman and Trevor Burnard (editors), Routledge 2012

The Routledge History of Slavery is a landmark publication that provides an overview of the main themes surrounding the history of slavery from ancient Greece to the present day. Taking stock of the field of Slave Studies, the book explores the major advances that have taken place in the past few decades of study in this crucial field.

Offering an unusual, transnational history of slavery, the chapters have all been specially commissioned for the collection. The volume begins by delineating the global nature of the institution of slavery, examining slavery in different parts of the world and over time. Topics covered here include slavery in Africa and the Indian Ocean World, as well as the Transatlantic Slave Trade. In Part Two, the chapters explore different themes that define slavery such as slave culture, the slave economy, slave resistance and the planter class, as well as areas of life affected by slavery, such as family and work. The final part goes on to study changes and continuities over time, looking at areas such as abolition, the aftermath of emancipation and commemoration. The volume concludes with a chapter on modern slavery.

Including essays on all the key topics and issues, this important collection from a leading international group of scholars presents a comprehensive survey of the current state of the field. It will be essential reading for all those interested in the history of slavery.

 

Heuman, Gad - 02 - The Caribbean (Brief Histories)

The Caribbean (Brief Histories)The Caribbean Brief Histories 2The Caribbean Brief Histories 3 
The Caribbean (Brief Histories)

Gad Heuman, Bloomsbury 2006 (first edition)

Gad Heuman, Bloomsbury 2013 (second edition)

Gad Heuman, Bloomsbury 2018 (third edition)

Columbus 'discovered' the Caribbean, not North America, and it was in the Caribbean that the Amerindians first felt the effects of European steel, gunpowder and (deadlier by far) microbes. The region became a pawn in the European struggle for empire and, later, a significant player in the developing Atlantic economy. Its economic importance rested on a substructure of African slavery, which provided labour for the numerous plantations across the region. However, slaves resisted slavery and, ultimately, the Abolitionist cause was carried successfully, initially in the British parliament and gradually elsewhere. Emancipation did not provide solutions to the ancillary ills of servitude - poverty, exploitation, inequality - and protest and resistance to colonial rule (whether British, Spanish, French, Dutch or Danish) continued. In the twentieth century, the United States largely replaced the old European powers as the dominant player in the area, and sought to intervene when it perceived its interests were threatened.

Second Edition: This new edition is fully revised and updated, with new material on the pre-Columbian era and the Hispanic Caribbean. It takes account not only of the political and social struggles that have shaped the Caribbean, but also provides a sense of the development of the region's culture.

Third Edition: In this new edition of his crucial introduction to Caribbean history, Gad Heuman provides a comprehensive overview of the region's history, from its earliest inhabitants to contemporary political and cultural developments. Topics covered include: - The Amerindians - Sugary and Slavery - Race, Racism and Equality - The Aftermath of Emancipation - The Revolutionary Caribbean - Cultures of the Caribbean This third edition has been updated to reflect the latest developments in the literature, and takes into account important recent events including the rapprochement between the U.S. and Cuba, the ongoing problem of climate change and the threat of the Zika virus. The companion website, which includes chapter questions, primary documents, a timeline and link to relevant websites, has also been updated with new material. The book considers not only of the political and social struggles that have shaped the Caribbean, but also provides a sense of the development of the region's culture. The Caribbean: A Brief History is ideal for all students seeking a clear and readable introduction to Caribbean history.
 

Heuman, Gad - 03 - Contesting Freedom: Control and Resistance in the Post-emancipation Caribbean

Contesting Freedom 
Contesting Freedom: Control and Resistance in the Post-emancipation Caribbean

Gad Heuman and David Trotman (editors), Macmillan 2005

This collection of studies is concerned with exploring some of the many issues faced by Caribbean Societies, as those societies grappled with the problems generated by the demise of slavery. The experiences of the post-slavery period make the Caribbean less of a homogenous area of study then the slave period, when the commonalities were more obvious and compelling. The circumstances in which the slave systems were dismantled, and the differences in the timing of the end of slavery combine with other factors to make the Caribbean an area of diverse post-emancipation experiences, despite some obvious areas of real commonality. The present volume seeks to contribute to the understanding of the post emancipation period by taking as its jumping off point the debate over continuity and change, and has as its central concerns the issues of conflict, control and resistance. The issues covered by the contributors include law and the penal system; riots and social uprising; labour control; religion, marriage and other areas of cultural interest. This collection is a result of a fruitful collaboration between the Centre for Caribbean Studies at the University of Warwick and the UNESCO-York University Nigerian Hinterland Project funded by the Canadian Social Sciences and Research Council.

 

Heuman, Gad - 04 - The Slavery Reader

The Slavery Reader 
The Slavery Reader

Gad Heuman and James Walvin (editors), Routledge 2003

The Slavery Reader brings together the most recent and essential writings on slavery. The focus is on Atlantic slavery – the enforced movement of millions of Africans from their homelands into the Americas, and the complex historical story of slavery in the Americas. Spanning almost five centuries – the late fifteenth until the mid-nineteenth – the articles trace the range and impact of slavery on the modern Western world.

 

 

 

Heuman, Gad - 05 - The Killing Time: The Morant Bay Rebellion in Jamaica

The Killing Time 
'The Killing Time': The Morant Bay Rebellion in Jamaica

Gad Heuman, University of Tennessee Press 1995

The Killing Time is the first full-length study of the Morant Bay rebellion in Jamaica - an event that transformed the political system of the island and marked a watershed in Caribbean history.

 

 

 

 

 

Heuman, Gad - 06 - Labour In The Caribbean: From Emancipation To Independence

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Labour In The Caribbean: From Emancipation To Independence

Gad Heuman and Malcolm Cross (editors), London 1988

 

 

 

Heuman, Gad - 07 - Out of the House of Bondage: Runaways, Resistance and Marronage in Africa and the New World

Out of the House of Bondage 
Out of the House of Bondage: Runaways, Resistance and Marronage in Africa and the New World

Gad Heuman (editor), Routledge 1986

Slave rebellions have been studied in considerable detail, but this volume examines other patterns of slave resistance, concentrating on runaway slaves and the communities some of them formed. These essays show us who the runaways were, suggest when and where they went, and who harboured them.

 

 

 

 

Heuman, Gad - 08 - Between Black and White: Race Politics and the Free Coloured in Jamaica, 1792-1865

Between Black and White 
Between Black and White: Race Politics and the Free Coloured in Jamaica, 1792-1865

Gad Heuman, Westport, Conn. and Oxford, 1981

The complex story of the rise and fall of the colored class in Jamaican politics is examined in this important contribution to the history of the Caribbean.

 

 

 

 

Hinton, James - 01 - Seven Lives From Mass Observation

Seven Lives From Mass Observation 
Seven Lives From Mass Observation

James Hinton, OUP 2016

What was it like to live in Britain during the second half of the twentieth century? In a successor to his acclaimed Nine Wartime Lives: Mass Observation and the Making of the Modern Self, James Hinton uses autobiographical writing contributed to Mass Observation since 1981 to explore the social and cultural history of late twentieth-century Britain. Prompted by thrice-yearly open-ended questionnaires, Mass Observation's volunteers wrote about their political attitudes, religious beliefs, work, childhoods, education, friendships, marriages, sex lives, mid-life crises, aging - the whole range of human emotion, feeling, attitudes, and experience. At the core of the book are seven 'biographical essays': intimate portraits of individual lives set in the context of the shift towards the more tolerant and permissive society of the 1960s and the rise of Thatcherite neo-liberalism as the structures of Britain's post-war settlement crumbled from the later 1970s.

The mass observers featured in the book, four women and three men, are drawn from across the social spectrum - wife of a small businessman, teacher, social worker, RAF wife, mechanic, lorry driver, City banker: all active and forceful characters with strong opinions and lives crowded with struggle and drama. The honesty and frankness with which they wrote about themselves takes us below the surface of public life to the efforts of 'ordinary', but exceptionally articulate and self-reflective, people to make sense of their lives in rapidly changing times.
 

Hinton, James - 02 - The Mass Observers: A History, 1937-1949

The Mass Observers 
The Mass Observers: A History, 1937-1949

James Hinton, OUP 2013

This is the first full-scale history of Mass-Observation, the independent social research organisation which, between 1937 and 1949, set out to document the attitudes, opinions, and every-day lives of the British people. Through a combination of anthropological fieldwork, opinion surveys, and written testimony solicited from hundreds of volunteers, Mass-Observation created a huge archive of popular life during a tumultuous decade which remains central to British national identity. The social history of these years has been immeasurably enriched by the archive, and extracts from the writings of M-O's volunteers have won a wide and admiring audience.

Now James Hinton, whose acclaimed Nine Wartime Lives demonstrated how the intensely personal writing of some of M-O's volunteers could be used to shed light on broader historical issues, has written a wonderfully vivid and evocative account which does justice not only to the two founders whose tempestuous relationship dominated the early years of Mass-Observation, but also to the dozens of creative and imaginative, and until now largely unknown, young enthusiasts whose work helped to keep the show on the road. The history of the organisation itself - the staff, the research methods, the struggle for funding, M-O's characteristic 'voice', and its role in the cultural and political life of the period - are themselves as interesting as any of the themes that the founders set out to document. This long-awaited and deeply researched history corrects and revises much of our existing knowledge of Mass-Observation, opens up new and important perspectives on the organisation, and will be seen as the authoritative account for years to come.

 

Hinton, James - 03 - Nine Wartime Lives: Mass Observation and the Making of the Modern Self

Nine Wartime Lives 
Nine Wartime Lives: Mass Observation and the Making of the Modern Self

James Hinton, OUP 2011

James Hinton uses diaries kept by nine 'ordinary' people in wartime Britain to re-evaluate the social history of the Second World War, and to reflect on the twentieth-century making of the modern self.

These diaries were written by some of the unusually self-reflective and public-spirited people who agreed to write intimate journals about their daily activity for the social research organisation, Mass Observation. One of the nine diarists discussed is Nella Last, whose published diaries have been a source of delight and fascination for many thousands of readers. Alongside her there are chapters on eight other Mass Observers, each in their own way as vivid, interesting, and surprising as Nella herself.

A central insight underpins the book: in seeking to make the best of our own lives, each of us makes selective use of the resources of our shared culture in a unique way; and, in so doing, we contribute, however modestly, to molecular processes of historical change. Placing individuals at the centre of his analysis, James Hinton probes the impact of war on attitudes to citizenship, the changing relationships between men and women, and the search for meanings in life that could transcend the wartime context of limitless violence.

Consistently sensitive, thoughtful and often moving, this beautifully written book resists nostalgic contrasts between the presumed dutiful citizenship of wartime Britain and contemporary anti-social individualism, pointing instead to longer run processes of change rooted as much in struggles for personal autonomy in the private sphere as in the politics of active citizenship in public life.

 

Hinton, James - 04 - Women, Social Leadership, and the Second World War: Continuities of Class

Continuities of Class 
Women, Social Leadership, and the Second World War: Continuities of Class

James Hinton, OUP 2002

The associational life of middle-class women in twentieth-century England has been largely ignored by historians. During the Second World War women's clubs, guilds, and institutes provided a basis for the mobilization of up to a million women, mainly housewives, into unpaid part-time work. Women's Voluntary Service, which was set up by the Government in 1938 to organize this work, generated a rich archive of reports and correspondence which provide the social historian with a unique window into the female public sphere.

Questioning the view that the Second World War served to democratize English society, James Hinton shows how the war enabled middle-class social leaders to reinforce their claims to authority. Displaying 'character' through their voluntary work, the leisured women at the centre of this study made themselves indispensable to the war effort. James Hinton delineates these 'continuities of class', reconstructing intimate portraits of local female social leadership in contrasting settings across provincial England (towns large and small, shire counties, the Durham coalfield), tracing complex and often acerbic rivalries within the voluntary sector, and uncovering gulfs of mutual distrust and incomprehension dividing publicly active women along gendered frontiers of class and party.

This study reminds us how much Britain's wartime mobilization relied on a Victorian ethos of public service to cope with the profoundly un-Victorian problems of total war. The women's associations so evocatively explored here reached the apex of their effectiveness during the Second World War, sustaining an uneasy balance between voluntarism and the expanding power of the state. In the longer term female social leaders found themselves marginalized by bureaucracy and professionalization. The stories told here demonstrate that the Second World War changed English society far less than is often assumed. It was not until the 1950s and 1960s that practices and attitudes laid down in the nineteenth century finally lost their purchase.

 

Hinton, James - 05 - Shop Floor Citizens: Engineering Democracy in 1940s Britain

Shop Floor Citizens 
Shop Floor Citizens: Engineering Democracy in 1940s Britain

James Hinton, Aldershot 1994

The institution of Joint Production Committees in British engineering factories during World War II represented the most substantial experiment in worker participation ever undertaken in British industry. This book explores the politics of this experiment and assesses its impact on factory life. It tells the story of a neglected campaign for industrial democracy, and argues that the division between communist and labour politics is central to explaining the absence of worker participation in post-war Britain.

 

 

Hinton, James - 06 - Protests and Visions: Peace Politics in Twentieth-Century Britain

Protests and Visions 
Protests and Visions: Peace Politics in Twentieth-Century Britain

James Hinton, London 1989

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hinton, James - 07 - Labour and Socialism: A History of the British Labour Movement, 1867-1974

Labour and Socialism 
Labour and Socialism: A History of the British Labour Movement, 1867-1974

James Hinton, Brighton 1983

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hinton, James - 08 - Trade Unions and Revolution: Industrial Politics of the Early British Communist Party

Trade Unions and Revolution 
Trade Unions and Revolution: Industrial Politics of the Early British Communist Party

James Hinton and Richard Hyman, Pluto Press 1975

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hinton, James - 09 - The First Shop Stewards' Movement

The First Shop Stewards 
The First Shop Stewards' Movement

James Hinton, London 1973

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

K

King, John - 01 - The Cambridge Companion to Mario Vargas Llosa

The Cambridge Companion to Mario Vargas Llosa 
The Cambridge Companion to Mario Vargas Llosa

John King and Efrain Kristal (editors), CUP 2012

One of the major novelists in world literature over the last five decades, Mario Vargas Llosa (b. 1936) is also one of Latin America's most engaging public intellectuals, a critic of art and culture, and a playwright of distinction. This Companion's chapters chart the development of Vargas Llosa's writings from his rise to prominence in the early 1960s to the award of the Nobel Prize for Literature in 2010. The volume traces the development of his literary trajectory and the ways in which he has re-invented himself as a writer. His vast output of narrative fiction is the main focus, but the connections between his concerns as a creative writer and his rich career as a cultural and political figure are also teased out in this engaging, informative book.

 

 

King, John - 02 - Mexico City through History and Culture

Mexico City 
Mexico City through History and Culture

John King and Linda Newson (editors), OUP/British Academy 2009

These essays celebrate Mexico City as a centre of cultural creativity, diversity, and dynamism, trace its history from the founding of the Aztec city of Tenochtitlan to the present day, and explore how the varied experiences of its inhabitants have been represented in poetry, film, and photography.

Looking at the pre-Columbian city, colonial city, and modern city, contributors show how Mexico City has grown organically, largely developed by waves of immigrants with new ideas and aspirations. While they have often envisioned the city in new ways, they have been unable to escape totally its historical past, and indeed at times have positively embraced it to serve contemporary political ends. As the city has grown, what it symbolises to its inhabitants and how they experience the city has become fragmented by social class and ethnicity. There is not one Mexico City, but many. The volume explores how these varied experiences have been represented in poetry, film, and photography.

Drawing from the fields of archaeology, history, political sociology, literature, cinema, and photography, this volume provides a unique insight into the history and culture of Mexico City.

 

King, John - 03 - El Di Tella, expanded edition

El Di Tella - second edition 
El Di Tella, expanded edition

John King, Asunto Impreso, Buenos Aires, 2007

The importance of the book of the British cultural historian John King is twofold. Firstly, because unveils one of the most important artistic and institutional experiences of the 20th century in Argentina and Latin America. Secondly, although in a transverse way, the book informs also about the particular period in which the research was conceived: the city of Buenos Aires during the last dictatorship. In this way, the book, more than 450 pages, restores in its complexity that initially was the undertaking of the brothers Guido and Torcuato Di Tella, for the promotion of the arts, but which later became one of the most famous scenes of the Buenos Aires avant garde of the 1960s, to the point that it is a reference to think about the social and cultural life of argentina and a hinge in the history of art Argentine. Structured around three art centres - Visual Arts Center, the audiovisual Centre and the Latin American Studies Center Music - Di Tella was developed in extended topography, covering not only the Institute, but to the Faculty of philosophy and letters, and numerous galleries of art, libraries and theatres located on florida Street and its surroundingscoming to baste the fabric of cultural modernization in those years.

 

King, John - 04 - The Role of Mexico's Plural in Latin American Literary and Political Culture

The Role of MexicoPlural 
The Role of Mexico's Plural in Latin American Literary and Political Culture

John King, Palgrave Macmillan 2007

Plural en la cultura literaria y política latinoamericana. De Tlatelolco a "El ogro filantrópico" (Spanish version)

John King, Fondo de Cultura Economica

The Mexican magazine Plural (1971-1976) is a privileged vantage point from which to assess the developments that transformed Mexican and Latin American literary and political culture in the 1970s. Edited by the Nobel prize winner Octavio Paz at a time in which he was reassessing his political and nationalistic commitments, it featured the editorial partnership of a heterogeneous group of Mexican writers. The book offers a detailed analysis of a vitally important moment in Mexican cultural and political history, in the aftermath of the 1968 massacre of students in Tlatelolco, Mexico City, at a time when a new president was seeking to repair the fractured relationship between intellectuals and the state. The most important figure in the magazine was its editor Octavio Paz and the study offers a fresh interpretation of the development of his political thought and artistic concerns in arguably the most vital and productive period of his life.

 

King, John - 05 - The Temptation of the Impossible: Victor Hugo and Les Misérables

The Temptation of the Impossible 
The Temptation of the Impossible: Victor Hugo and Les Misérables

Mario Vargas Llosa (author) and John King (translator), Princeton University Press 2007

It was one of the most popular novels of the nineteenth century and Tolstoy called it "the greatest of all novels." Yet today Victor Hugo's Les Misérables is neglected by readers and undervalued by critics. In The Temptation of the Impossible, one of the world's great novelists, Mario Vargas Llosa, helps us to appreciate the incredible ambition, power, and beauty of Hugo's masterpiece and, in the process, presents a humane vision of fiction as an alternative reality that can help us imagine a different and better world.

Hugo, Vargas Llosa says, had at least two goals in Les Misérables--to create a complete fictional world and, through it, to change the real world. Despite the impossibility of these aims, Hugo makes them infectious, sweeping up the reader with his energy and linguistic and narrative skill. Les Misérables, Vargas Llosa argues, embodies a utopian vision of literature--the idea that literature can not only give us a supreme experience of beauty, but also make us more virtuous citizens, and even grant us a glimpse of the "afterlife, the immortal soul, God." If Hugo's aspiration to transform individual and social life through literature now seems innocent, Vargas Llosa says, it is still a powerful ideal that great novels like Les Misérables can persuade us is true.

 

King, John - 06 - Touchstones

Touchstones 
Touchstones

Mario Vargas Llosa (author) and John King (essay selector, editor, translator), Faber & Faber 2007

Fantastically intelligent, inspired and surprising, Touchstones is a landmark collection of essays from one of the world's leading writers and intellectuals.

One of Latin America's most garlanded writers, Mario Vargas Llosa is also an acute and wide-ranging cultural critic and an acerbic political commentator. Touchstones includes his readings of major twentieth-century novels, from Heart of Darkness to The Tin Drum , and other major works by Hemingway, Woolf, Orwell, Camus and Nabokov.

There are long studies of George Grosz, vignettes on Bolero and Picasso, and an appreciation of Cézanne and Van Gogh, including a visit to Gauguin's homes on the South Seas. Also included are essays on political and social thinkers, from the nineteenth-century feminist Flora Tristan to Isaiah Berlin, and contemporary pieces on 9/11, the aftermath of the war in Iraq, and the terrorist attacks on London and Madrid.

 

King, John - 07 - The Cambridge Companion to Modern Latin American Culture

The Cambridge Companion to Modern Latin American Culture 
The Cambridge Companion to Modern Latin American Culture

John King (editor), CUP 2004

Specially-commissioned essays analyze Latin American history, politics, art and literature from the nineteenth century to the present and reveal the common heritage of pre-Columbian and colonial Latin America. Although the Portuguese and Spanish-speaking states created in the early 1820s differed greatly geographically and demographically (in ethnic composition and economic resources), they also shared distinct historical and cultural traits. A chronology and guide to further reading make this volume an invaluable introduction to the rich and varied culture of modern Latin America.

 

 

 

King, John - 08 - An Argentine Passion: Maria Luisa Bemberg and her Films

An Argentine Passion 
An Argentine Passion: Maria Luisa Bemberg and her Films

John King, Sheila Whitaker, Rosa Bosch (editors), London 2000

Maria Luisa Bemberg, who died in 1995, was one of Latin America’s best known and most popular film-makers. The only woman director in the region to have achieved consistent success both nationally and internationally, she is all the more remarkable for having made her first feature at the age of fifty-eight.

Born into a traditional, aristocratic Argentine family, her late-blossoming career focused above all on women’s issues. The six films she made between 1980 and 1993 all have female protagonists who seek to transgress limits: from Camila O’Gorman, executed in the nineteenth century for her love of a Cathoolic priest, to the remarkable nun Sor Juana Ines de la Cruz, Mexico’s foremost colonial poet and intellectual, whose enquiring mind was a threat to the discipline of the Church. Bemberg was, as in the title of her second film, senora de nadie, nobody’s woman, someone who found her own way in a national film industry dominated by men, and who brought a new way of seeing, a distinctive visual style, to international film-making.

This is the first major study of Maria Luisa Bemberg’s work. It containes, uniquely, the views of those who worked with her—her producer, cinematographer, script writer, and actors—alongside her own comments about the film industry and her work in it. In addition to a range of Argentine, British and North American scholars offer readings of each of her films and assess her contribution to contemporary international cinema.

 

King, John - 09 - Magical Reels: History of Cinema in Latin America (second edition)

Magical Reels - second edition 
Magical Reels: History of Cinema in Latin America (second edition)

John King, Verso Books 2000

Still the finest comprehensive analysis of the subject to have appeared in English, Magical Reels charts the development of Latin American film industries in a world increasingly dominated by the advanced technology and massive distribution budgets of the North American mainstream. John King sets up a historical framework to unfold the overlapping histories of cinema in the continent: the itinerant filmmakers of the silent era who projected their films in cafes and village halls, the inventive use of vernacular music and local comedy in the early sound pictures, the "golden age" of 1940s Mexican cinema, and the new cinema - oppositional cinema made "with an idea in the head and a camera in the hand" - of the late 1950s and beyond. A new chapter written for this edition examines Latin American cinema in the previous decade.

 

King, John - 10 - Making Waves: Essays, by Mario Vargos Llosa

Making Waves 
Making Waves: Essays, by Mario Vargos Llosa

John King (essay selector, editor, translator), New York 1998

Spanning thirty years of writing, Making Waves traces the development of the Nobel Prize–winning author Mario Vargas Llosa’s thinking on politics and culture, and shows the breadth of his interests and passions. Featured here are astute meditations on the Cuban Revolution, Latin American independence, and the terrorism of Peru’s Shining Path; brilliant engagements with towering figures of literature such as Joyce, Faulkner, and Sartre; and observations about the dog cemetery where Rin Tin Tin is buried, Lorena Bobbitt’s knife, and the failures of the English public-school system.

This book won the prestigious US National Book Critics Circle Award in 1998.

 
 

King, John - 11 - Mediating Two Worlds: Cinematic Encounters in the Americas

Mediating Two Worlds 
Mediating Two Worlds: Cinematic Encounters in the Americas

John King, Ana M. Lopez, Manuel Alvarado (editors), British Film Institute 1993

The five hundredth anniversary of the landing of Columbus in the Americas was the occasion for a prolonged debate on the consequences for both Americans and Europeans of that fateful event. Now another anniversary looms, the centenary of the invention of the cinema, a moment in its way no less revolutionary in its effect on consciousness. Cinematic encounters between Europe and America have taken place almost throughout the entirety of this period.

This collection of essays is the first to take stock of mutual enrichment that has been the result. In the first half of the book, the contributors explore the many and varied ways in which European and North American cinemas have attempted to represent the societies of Latin America. In the second part, the focus shifts to Latin American cinema in its own terms.

 

King, John - 12 - Jorge Luis Borges: A Writer on the Edge

Jorge Luis Borges 
Jorge Luis Borges: A Writer on the Edge

Beatriz Sarlo (author) and John King (editor and translator), Verso 1993

Jorge Luis Borges is generally acknowledged to be one of the 20th century's most significant writers. Yet in all the critical debates on his work, the fact that he is an Argentine writer is rarely discussed, as if his world reputation had somehow cleansed him of nationality. In "Jorge Luis Borges", Sarlo challenges these "universalist" readings, arguing that they leave aside vital aspects of Borges' writing, including his most powerful vision of Argentina's past and its traditions, which placed both the writer and his country at the strange intersection of European and Latin American culture.

 

 

 

King, John - 13 - The Land That England Lost: Argentina and Britain, a Special Relationship

The Land that England Lost 
The Land That England Lost: Argentina and Britain, a Special Relationship

John King and Alistair Hennessy (editors), I. B. Tauris 1992

This collection of essays covers Britain's relationship with Argentina from the 19th century, when Argentina formed part of Britain's "informal empire", up until the Falklands War and its aftermath. Among the subjects covered are: the role of Argentina in the "informal empire"; British capital in Argentina; the decline of the connection and the rise of Peron; British emigration and settlement; culture, literature and dance; the press and the Perons; the Antarctic dimension; the Falklands War and its aftermath; and the future of the relationship.

 

 

 

King, John - 14 - British-Argentine Relations: A Joint Report

British-Argentine Relations 
British-Argentine Relations: A Joint Report

John King, Royal Institute of International Affairs 1991

A study into British-Argentine Foreign Relations from political, economic, historic and legal facets.

 

 

 

 

 

King, John - 15 - Magical Reels: A History of Cinema In Latin America

Magical ReelsEl carrete magico 
Magical Reels: A History of Cinema In Latin America

John King, London 1990

El carrete mágico. Una historia del cine latinoamericano (Spanish version)

Tercer Mundo Editores, 1994

The most comprehensive analysis of the subject to have appeared in English, Magical Reels charts the development of Latin American film industries in a world increasingly dominated by the advanced technology and massive distribution budgets of the North American mainstream.

John King sets up a historical framework to unfold the overlapping histories of cinema in the continent: the itinerant film-makers of the silent era who projected their films in cafes and village halls, the inventive use of vernacular music and local comedy in early sound pictures, the “golden age” of 1940s Mexican cinema, and the “new cinema”—oppositional cinema made “with an idea in the head and a camera in the hand”—of the late 1950s and beyond. A country-by-country account of this new wave allows detailed discussion of, for instance, Peronist cinema in Argentina, 1960s’ revolutionary film-making in Cuba, state-sponsored cinema in 1970s’ Brazil and Venezuela, and the struggle for democratization in Chile in the 1980s.

 

King, John - 16 - The Garden of Forking Paths: Argentine Cinema

The Garden of Forking Paths 
The Garden of Forking Paths: Argentine Cinema

John King and Nissa Torrents (editors), British Film Institute, London, 1988

This dossier accompanies a major retrospective of Argentine cinema to be screened at the National Film Theatre in London, curated by John King and Nissa Torrents. It offers an historical context for the films and features interviews with several leading contemporary filmmakers. It is intended both as an academic guide and as an act of cultural bridge-building at a time when our two countries, Britain and Argentina, are still 'officially' at war.

 

 

 

King, John - 17 - On Modern Latin American Fiction

On Modern Latin American FictionModern Latin American Fiction 
On Modern Latin American Fiction

Modern Latin American Fiction: A Survey

John King (editor), Faber 1987

There has long been a need for an introduction to the distinctive and dynamic literature of Latin America.

This ground-breaking collection analyzes the evolution of modern Latin American fiction and provides critical assessments of its best-known writers. The book focuses mainly on developments since the late 1950s, the so-called boom period, emphasizing works available in translation. The contributors include leading critics, as well as some of the writers themselves. Most of the essays were written especially for this book.

On Modern Latin American Fiction discusses the work of writers from Cuba, Argentina, Mexico, Colombia, Peru, Chile, and Paraguay. There are interviews with Carlos Fuentes and Guillermo Cabrera Infante, as well as an overview of the work of Isabel Allende, Luisa Valenzuela, and other women writers. Roa Campos, who has lived outside his native Paraguay since 1947, describes the many forms of exile suffered by Latin American writers, while Manuel Puid tells of his dual commitment to film and fiction, beginning with his first visit to the local movie theater in the Argentine pampas.

 

King, John - 18 - Sur: A Study of the Argentine Literary Journal and its Role in the Development of a Culture, 1931-1970

SurSur - Spanish 
Sur: A Study of the Argentine Literary Journal and its Role in the Development of a Culture, 1931-1970

John King, CUP 1986

Sur estudio revista Argentina (Spanish version)

John King, Fondo de Cultura Economica 1991

This book tells the story of Sur, Argentina's foremost literary and cultural journal of the twentieth century. Victoria Ocampo (its founder and lifelong editor) and Jorge Luis Borges (a regular and influential contributor) feature prominently in the story, while the contributions of other major writers (including Eduardo Mallea, William Faulkner, Andre Breton, Virginia Woolf, Alfonso Reyes, Octavio Paz, Waldo Frank, Aldous Huxley and Graham Greene) are discussed. Politically speaking, Sur represented a certain brand of liberalism, a resistance to populism and mass culture, and an attachment to elitist values which offended against the more dominant phases of Argentine thought, from Peronism to the varied forms of nationalism, socialism and Marxism. John King examines the journal's roots, its development and its demise, relating it to other journals circulating at the time, and highlighting vital issues debated in its pages, such as Argentine attitudes towards fascism during the Second World War.

 

King, John - 19 - El Di Tella y el desarrollo cultural argentino

El Di Tella 
El Di Tella y el desarrollo cultural argentino

John King, Editorial Gaglianone, Buenos Aires, 1985

The importance of the book of the British cultural historian John King is twofold. Firstly, because unveils one of the most important artistic and institutional experiences of the 20th century in Argentina and Latin America. Secondly, although in a transverse way, the book informs also about the particular period in which the research was conceived: the city of Buenos Aires during the last dictatorship. In this way, the book, more than 450 pages, restores in its complexity that initially was the undertaking of the brothers Guido and Torcuato Di Tella, for the promotion of the arts, but which later became one of the most famous scenes of the Buenos Aires avant garde of the 1960s, to the point that it is a reference to think about the social and cultural life of argentina and a hinge in the history of art Argentine. Structured around three art centres - Visual Arts Center, the audiovisual Centre and the Latin American Studies Center Music - Di Tella was developed in extended topography, covering not only the Institute, but to the Faculty of philosophy and letters, and numerous galleries of art, libraries and theatres located on florida Street and its surroundingscoming to baste the fabric of cultural modernization in those years.

 

L

Lewis, Gwynne - 01 - France 1715-1804: Power and the People

France 1715-1804 
France 1715-1804: Power and the People

Gwynne Lewis, Routledge 2004

Gwynne Lewis’ history opens with a full analysis of all the components of traditional France, including political and religious structures, the seigneurial system, the bourgeoisie and the poor. Part two examines the meaning and challenge of the Enlightenment, with particular reference to women and the mass of the poor. Part three concentrates upon the relationship between the shift to laissez-faire economics, popular revolts and government repression, providing the essential background to the Revolutionary decade of the 1790s. The Revolution witnessed the rise of a politicised ‘Popular Movement’ that achieved, briefly, a measure of popular democracy. War and counter-revolution blocked the move towards real democracy, strengthened the authority of the centralised state, and enhanced the credibility of bourgeois political and economic power.

One of the main contentions of this work is that the failure of both monarchical and Revolutionary regimes to deal with the massive social problem of poverty played a far larger part in explaining the collapse of the Bourbons in 1789, and the failure of democracy during the 1790s, than most historians have allowed. Likewise, the importance of religion in directing the momentous events of this period has also been under-estimated.

 

Lewis, Gwynne - 02 - The Advent of Modern Capitalism in France, 1770-1840: The Contribution of Pierre-Francois Tubeuf

The Advent of Modern Capitalism in France 1770-1840 
The Advent of Modern Capitalism in France, 1770-1840: The Contribution of Pierre-Francois Tubeuf

Gwynne Lewis, OUP 1994

This is the story of one of the most dynamic entrepreneurs in modern French history. Drawing upon a wealth of archival and private documentation, Gwynne Lewis uncovers the history of Pierre-Francois Tubeuf and assesses his conntribution to the development of industry in France. Professor Lewis explores the relationship between seigneurial, proto-industrial, and modern forms of capitalism in the Cevennes region of south-eastern France in the eighteenth century, and demonstrates the international scope of proto-industrialization. This subtle and scholarly study seeks to unravel the complex problems associated with the impact of the French Revolution on the processes of modern French capitalism. Professor Lewis traces the responses of a wide variety of individuals, including Tubeuf and his greatest rival, the marechal de Castries. He examines the epic struggle of these two powerful men for control of the rich coal-mines of the region, and their legacy to succeeding generations.

 

Lewis, Gwynne - 03 - The French Revolution: Rethinking the Debate

The French Revolution: Rethinking the Debate 
The French Revolution: Rethinking the Debate

Gwynne Lewis, Routledge 1993

This is the first short introductory history of the French Revolution which covers social, economic and cultural aspects of the period as well as intellectual and political matters. It combines interpretative narrative with thematic analysis, incorporates traditional and recent studies into a new synthesis, engages in past and present controversies, concentrates equally on the popular classes and the privileged elites. The French Revolution provides students with an accessible and challenging resume of the revolution and its historians.

 

 

 

Lewis, Gwynne - 04 - The Second Vendee: The Continuity of Counter-Revolution in the Department of the Gard, 1789-1815

The Second Vendee 
The Second Vendee: The Continuity of Counter-Revolution in the Department of the Gard, 1789-1815

Gwynne Lewis, OUP 1978

 

 

 

 

 

 

Lewis, Gwynne - 05 - Life in Revolutionary France

Life in Revolutionary France 
Life in Revolutionary France

Gwynne Lewis, Batsford 1972

 

 

 

 

 

 

Luddy, Maria - 01 - Children, Childhood and Irish Society, 1500 to the Present

Children, Childhood and Irish Society 
Children, Childhood and Irish Society, 1700 to the Present

Maria Luddy and James Smith (editors), Four Courts Press Ltd, 2014

Studies of Irish children's literature are relatively numerous in Ireland, and yet the study of children and childhood, and the concepts associated with these words, is really just beginning in Ireland. Addressing this lacuna, this book is a significant contribution to the field of childhood studies. The book examines how attitudes to children have changed in Ireland over the past half millennium. The contents are informed in part by the emergence of Children's Studies as an area of critical inquiry within interdisciplinary cultural studies. What, if anything, is new about how childhood is currently understood in Ireland? How has the understanding of Irish childhood changed over time? And how do earlier conceptions of Irish childhood feed into and/or inform more recent conceptualizations? Reflecting the interests of historians, literary critics, and the discipline of social work, in an attempt to cross-reference how children and childhood, The book generates considered and important answers to these questions. This collection examines how attitudes to children have changed in Ireland over the centuries, and it addresses how concepts of childhood in Ireland have changed.
 

Luddy, Maria - 02 - Matters of Deceit: Breach of Promise to Marry Cases in Nineteenth and Twentieth Century Limerick

Matters of Deceit 
Matters of Deceit: Breach of Promise to Marry Cases in Nineteenth and Twentieth Century Limerick

Maria Luddy, Dublin: Four Courts Press 2011

In Irish history, marriage was of huge significance to women and men for social, emotional, and economic reasons. Married women had greater status than unmarried women. The most acceptable way to form families was through marriage and, as in all time periods, both men and women desired children. Economic stability - though not necessarily guaranteed by marriage - was an inducement to marriage for many women, especially in a society where paid employment opportunities for them were limited. A breach of promise to marry is a fundamental break of a promise - by either a man or woman - to carry through a marriage. However, as this book shows, breach of promise cases were not always straightforward. Exploring the history of breach of promise cases in Ireland allows an insight into courtship rituals. It reveals the significance of monetary considerations in marriage settlements and the value that was placed on women's - and men's - reputations.
 

Luddy, Maria - 03 - Cultures of Care in Irish Medical History, 1750-1970

Cultures of Care 
Cultures of Care in Irish Medical History, 1750-1970

Maria Luddy and Catherine Cox, Basingstoke: Palgrave /Macmillan 2010

Cultures of Care in Irish Medical History, 1750-1950 interrogates the practices and cultures of medical care in Ireland from the eighteenth to the twentieth centuries. Historians examine health in Ireland through the prisms of state provision, professionalisation and the experiences of health and illness. Individual essays include analyses of quacks and cures; an exploration of contraception, discussions on the history of suicide, patients' attitudes to medical practitioners; the role of the coroners' courts, and the treatment of criminal lunatics. Personal experience of professional health care is explored in an examination of the influenza epidemic, 1918-19, and infanticide in Ireland.
 

Luddy, Maria - 04 - Prostitution and Irish Society, 1800-1940

Prostitution and Irish Society 
Prostitution and Irish Society, 1800-1940

Maria Luddy, Cambridge University Press 2007

This is the first book to tackle the controversial history of prostitution in Ireland in the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. Maria Luddy uncovers the extent of prostitution in the country, how Irish women came to work as prostitutes, their living conditions and their treatment by society. She links discussions of prostitution to the Irish nationalist and suffrage movements of the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, analysing the ways in which Irish nationalism used the problems of prostitution and venereal disease to argue for the withdrawal of the British from Ireland. She also investigates the contentious history of Magdalen asylums and explores how the infamous red-light district of Dublin's 'Monto' was finally suppressed through the actions of the Legion of Mary in the 1920s. Revealing complex social and religious attitudes towards prostitution in Irish society, this book opens up a new world in Ireland's social and political history.
 

Luddy, Maria - 05 - The Crimean Journals of the Sisters of Mercy, 1854-56

The Crimean Journals 
The Crimean Journals of the Sisters of Mercy, 1854-56

Maria Luddy (editor), Dublin: Four Courts Press 2004

In December 1854 fifteen nuns from Ireland arrived in the Crimea to nurse the sick and wounded British soldiers who were fighting in the Crimean War. The head of this mission was Mother M. Francis Bridgeman of Kinsale, and among her community were Sister M. Doyle of Gort and Sister M. Joseph Croke of Charleville. All three kept an account of their experiences, recording the conditions under which they travelled to the Crimea, the state of the hospitals they worked in, their relationships with the soldiers, medical and military authorities. Florence Nightingale was already building her reputation with the work she and her assistants were carrying out in the hospitals. Mother Francis Bridgeman, in her first negotiations with Nightingale, noted that she had 'an ambitious woman to deal with on whom she could not rely'. Bridgeman and Nightingale were both strong personal ities who were unwilling to concede authority and control to the other. Issues of power, class and identity formed the basis of the disagreements that developed between the two women. This is the first publication of these three journals, which include letters from Florence Nightingale.

Relating tales of danger, intrigue and heroism these journals provide a new insight into the medical conditions under which nursing took place during the war, and the disputes that occurred between the Irish Sisters and Nightingale.
 

Luddy, Maria - 06 - Women in Twentieth-Century Ireland: Sources from the files of the Department of the Taoiseach

The National Archives of Ireland 
Women in Twentieth-Century Ireland: Sources from the files of the Department of the Taoiseach

Catherine Cox, Orla Fitzpatrick, Leeann Lane, Maria Luddy

National Archives of Ireland, 2003

A project to survey and list sources relevant to the history of women in Ireland. Two major databases are available here for online searching. The Directory of Sources for the History of Women in Ireland contains information on collections relating to the history of women in Ireland from the earliest times to the present. Women in 20th-Century Ireland: Sources from the Department of the Taoiseach, 1922-1966 is the result of a survey that involved examining the files of the Department of the Taoiseach between the years 1922 and 1966.
 

Luddy, Maria - 07 - Field Day Anthology of Irish Writing, vols. 4 and 5, Irish Women's Writing and Traditions

The Field Day Anthology of Irish Writing - Volumes IV and V 
Field Day Anthology of Irish Writing, vols. 4 and 5, Irish Women's Writing and Traditions

Maria Luddy, Angela Bourke, Siobhan Kilfeather, Margaret MacCurtain, Gerardine Meaney, Mairin Ni Dhonnchadha, Mary O'Dowd, Clair Wills (editors)

Cork University Press/New York, New York University Press, 2002

The collection goes beyond an anthology of writing by women and opts for an anthology of writing thematizing women and gender issues. This shift from an authorial to a thematic approach is daring and proves highly fruitful. The materials are from Ireland on gender, not shirking anonymous and male-authored selections. This in fact gives far greater coherence to a very wide-ranging selection of texts, from legal to lyrical and from medical to mythical, yet with a common focus and a constant unifying concern. What is more, the section shows that gender issues, while often taking on a specific form or intension in the Irish context, are not restricted to Ireland alone: the editors have wisely chosen to include translations and reflections of wider European or global currents.
 

Luddy, Maria - 08 - Female Activists: Irish Women and Change, 1900-1960

Female Activists 
Female Activists: Irish Women and Change, 1900-1960

Maria Luddy and Mary Cullen (editors), Dublin: Woodfield Press, 2001

Female Activists charts the lives and work of women who were significant figures in Irish political life in the twentieth century. Many of these women had cut their activist teeth in the suffrage campaign and went on to play an important role on the national and international political stage from the time of independence.

These biographical studies recount the lives and work of trade unionists, Louie Bennett, Helena Molony and Mary Galway, and political activists, Kathleen Lynn, Rosamond Jacob, Hanna Sheehy Skeffington and Margaret Cousins. While often associated with one particular arena these women, in reality, campaigned on numerous significant issues, from suffrage to pacifism, republicanism, trade unionism, socialism and health reform. In addition, Jacob was a novelist, Molony a leading Abbey actress, and Lynn a pioneer in pediatric medicine. Many were viewed as 'radical' in a society that was deeply conservative.

This collection adds considerably to our view of women's place in twentieth-century Ireland. It provides the first comprehensive study of a significant group of Irish women. It presents a challenging and original contribution to Irish history.
 

Luddy, Maria - 09 - A Directory of Sources for Women's History in Ireland

The National Archives of Ireland 
A Directory of Sources for Women's History in Ireland

Catherine Cox, Leeann Lane, Maria Luddy, D. Urquhart

National Archives of Ireland, 1999

A project to survey and list sources relevant to the history of women in Ireland. Two major databases are available here for online searching. The Directory of Sources for the History of Women in Ireland contains information on collections relating to the history of women in Ireland from the earliest times to the present. Women in 20th-Century Ireland: Sources from the Department of the Taoiseach, 1922-1966 is the result of a survey that involved examining the files of the Department of the Taoiseach between the years 1922 and 1966.
 

Luddy, Maria - 10 - Women and Philanthropy in Nineteenth-Century Ireland

Women and Philanthropy 
Women and Philanthropy in Nineteenth-Century Ireland

Maria Luddy, Cambridge University Press 1995

This book examines the role of women in philanthropy in nineteenth-century Ireland. The author focuses initially on the impact of religion on the lives of women and argues that the development of convents in the nineteenth century inhibited the involvement of lay Catholic women in charity work. She goes on to claim that sectarianism dominated women's philanthropic activity, and also analyses the work of women in areas of moral concern, such as prostitution and prison work.

The book concludes that the most progressive developments in the care of the poor were brought about by non-conformist women, and a number of women involved in reformist organisations were later to become pioneers in the cause of suffrage. This study makes an important contribution both to Irish history and to our knowledge of women's lives and experiences in the nineteenth century.
 

Luddy, Maria - 11 - Hanna Sheehy Skeffington

Hanna Sheehy Skeffington 
Hanna Sheehy Skeffington

Maria Luddy, Irish Historical Association 1995

This series of short biographical studies published by the Historical Association of Ireland is designed to place the lives of leading historical figures against the background of new research on the problems and conditions of their times. This is the fifth book in the series.

Hanna Sheehy Skeffington was a suffragette and Irish nationalist. Along with her husband and Margaret Cousins and James Cousins she founded the Irish Women's Franchise League in 1908 with the aim of obtaining women's voting rights. She was later a founding member of the Irish Women Workers' Union.
 

Luddy, Maria - 12 - Women in Ireland, 1800-1918: A Documentary History

Women in Ireland 1800-1918 
Women in Ireland, 1800-1918: A Documentary History

Maria Luddy, Cork University Press 1995

Women in Ireland 1800-1918 presents a valuable and significant collection of over 100 sources and documents relating to the public and private aspects of women's lives in Ireland during the period 1800-1918. The documents reveal aspects of the women's working lives, educational experiences, involvement in politics and of their private lives such as contraception, childbirth, love, marriage and religion. Each section has a comprehensive introduction which discusses the contents of the documents. As the first major survey of Irish women's lives during this period, it will appeal to those who want a deeper understanding of how women of all classes lived their lives and it will prove indispensable to second and third level students, those attending women's studies courses, as well as a wide general readership interested in assessing the role of women in nineteenth and early twentieth-century Irish history.
 

Luddy, Maria - 13 - Women, Power and Consciousness in 19th-Century Ireland: Eight Biographical Studies

Women, Power and Consciousness 
Women, Power and Consciousness in 19th-Century Ireland: Eight Biographical Studies

Maria Luddy and Mary Cullen (editors), Dublin: Attic Press 1995

This original and scholarly work charts the lives of eight women - Anna Wheeler, Margaret Aylward, Frances Power Cobbe, Anne Jellicoe, Anna Haslam, Isabelle Tod, Charlotte Grace O'Brien and Anna Parnell - whose agitation for educational and social reform and the nationalist cause, changed the course of Irish history.

 

 

 

Luddy, Maria - 14 - Women Surviving: Studies in Irish Women's History in the 19th and 20th Centuries

Women Surviving 
Women Surviving: Studies in Irish Women's History in the 19th and 20th Centuries

Maria Luddy and Cliona Murphy (editors), Dublin: Poolbeg 1990

 

 

 

 

 

M

Magraw, Roger - 01 - A History of the French Working Class, Volume II: Workers and the Bourgeois Republic 1871-1939

A History of the French Working Class 
A History of the French Working Class, Volume II: Workers and the Bourgeois Republic 1871-1939

Roger Magraw, Wiley-Blackwell 1993

Marx's optimism about the revolutionary potential of the European working class derived from his observation of the Parisian and Lyonnais workers' revolts of the 1830s and 1840s. The 'new labour history' sought to explain such precocious class consciousness culture of artisans which, it argued, generated a 'trade socialism' which aspired to build a 'social Republic' around producer cooperatives.

More recently, the 'new labour history', a product of the ephemeral radical optimism of the 1960s, has come under assault from a revisionist historiography influenced by cultural anthropology, post-modernism and feminism, which questions such fundamental teleology of the 'rise of labour', the obsession with the 'skill' of male workers. Labour historicans have been criticised for failing to integrate gender analysis or to analyse discourses about workers, for uncritical acceptance of the 'myth' of the artisan and for viewing the Ancien Regime uncritically as a lost Golden Age of craft skills.

In the face of this onslaught is it still possible to seek to describe the 'making of the French working class'? This volume attempts to grapple with the insights of the revisionists, while salvaging what can be salvaged from older labour historiography. It insists on the central importance of the national political context. The 'peculiarities' of French labour owed much to workers' participation in the 'Bourgeois Revolution' of 1789-1830. The shifting labour policies of successive royalist, Bonapartist and Republican regimes were key determinants of the style of labour politics - as was workers' ambivalent relationship with the anticlerical 'progressive' wing of the bourgeoisie.

However, on balance, the book re-asserts the importance of artisanal resistance to perceived threats to their work-culture. Moreover, it insists that although the 'objective' structural class-formation of the French working class was gradual and uneven, a hereditary proletariat was emerging by the 1860s.

 

Magraw, Roger - 02 - A History of the French Working Class, Volume I: The Age of Artisan Revolution 1815-1871

A History of the French Working Class, Volume 1 
A History of the French Working Class, Volume I: The Age of Artisan Revolution 1815-1871

Roger Magraw, Wiley-Blackwell 1992

Marx's optimism about the revolutionary potential of the European working class derived from his observation of the Parisian and Lyonnais workers' revolts of the 1830s and 1840s. The 'new labour history' sought to explain such precocious class consciousness culture of artisans which, it argued, generated a 'trade socialism' which aspired to build a 'social Republic' around producer cooperatives.

More recently, the 'new labour history', a product of the ephemeral radical optimism of the 1960s, has come under assault from a revisionist historiography influenced by cultural anthropology, post-modernism and feminism, which questions such fundamental teleology of the 'rise of labour', the obsession with the 'skill' of male workers. Labour historicans have been criticised for failing to integrate gender analysis or to analyse discourses about workers, for uncritical acceptance of the 'myth' of the artisan and for viewing the Ancien Regime uncritically as a lost Golden Age of craft skills.

In the face of this onslaught is it still possible to seek to describe the 'making of the French working class'? This volume attempts to grapple with the insights of the revisionists, while salvaging what can be salvaged from older labour historiography. It insists on the central importance of the national political context. The 'peculiarities' of French labour owed much to workers' participation in the 'Bourgeois Revolution' of 1789-1830. The shifting labour policies of successive royalist, Bonapartist and Republican regimes were key determinants of the style of labour politics - as was workers' ambivalent relationship with the anticlerical 'progressive' wing of the bourgeoisie.

However, on balance, the book re-asserts the importance of artisanal resistance to perceived threats to their work-culture. Moreover, it insists that although the 'objective' structural class-formation of the French working class was gradual and uneven, a hereditary proletariat was emerging by the 1860s.

 

Magraw, Roger - 03 - France, 1815-1914: The Bourgeois Century

France 1815-1914Il secolo borghese in Francia 
France, 1815-1914: The Bourgeois Century

Roger Magraw, OUP 1986

Il secolo borghese in Francia, 1815-1914 (Italian version)

Roger Magraw, Il Mulino 1987

In this lively and stimulating study, Roger Magraw examines how the 19th-century French bourgeoisie struggled and eventually succeeded in consolidating the gains it made in 1789. The book describes the attempts of the bourgeoisie to remold France in its own image and its strategy for overcoming the resistance from the old aristocratic and clerical elites and the popular classes. Incorporating the most recent research on religion and anticlericalism, the development of the economy, the role of women in society, and the educational system, this work is the first to draw extensively on the new social history in its interpretation of events in 19th-century France.

 

Mallett, Michael - 01 - The Italian Wars 1494-1559: War, State and Society in Early Modern Europe

The Italian Wars 
The Italian Wars 1494-1559: War, State and Society in Early Modern Europe

Michael Mallett and Christine Shaw, Routledge 2012

The Italian Wars of 1494-1559 had a major impact on the whole of Renaissance Europe. In this important text, Michael Mallett and Christine Shaw place the conflict within the political and economic context of the wars. Emphasising the gap between aims and strategies of the political masters and what their commanders and troops could actually accomplish on the ground, they analyse developments in military tactics and the tactical use of firearms and examine how Italians of all sectors of society reacted to the wars and the inevitable political and social change that they brought about.

The history of Renaissance Italy is currently being radically rethought by historians. This book is a major contribution to this re-evaluation, and will be essential reading for all students of Renaissance and military history.

 

Mallett, Michael - 02 - The Military Organization of a Renaissance State: Venice c.1400 to 1617

The Military Organization of a Renaissance State 
The Military Organisation of a Renaissance State: Venice c.1400 to 1617

Michael Mallett and J R Hale, Cambridge University Press, 2006

This book describes the role and organization of the land forces of a renaissance state over a long period. It thus provides a model against which the military development of other countries can be measured in terms of the composition, control and cost of armies. Above all, it redresses the imbalance whereby only the naval forces of Venice have been studied seriously. It is thus an essential contribution to an understanding of the extension and maintenance of an empire by land and sea, and of the strength in troops and fortifications that preserved Venice as the one truly independent state in sixteenth-century Italy. It also adds significantly to an understanding of the relationship between Venice and the republic's subject territories.

 

 

Mallett, Michael - 03 - Lorenzo the Magnificent: Culture and Politics

Lorenzo the Magnificent 
Lorenzo the Magnificent: Culture and Politics

Michael Mallett and Nicholas Mann (editors), London 1996

The colloquium held at the Warburg Institute and the University of Warwick in May 1992 to mark the 500th anniversary of Lorenzo de' Medici's death included papers by historians of art and literature, drama and public spectacle, and politics and society. This volume examines Lorenzo's world.

 

 

 

 

Mallett, Michael - 04 - War, Culture and Society in Renaissance Venice: Essays in Honour of John Hale

War Culture and Society in Renaissance Venice 
War, Culture and Society in Renaissance Venice: Essays in Honour of John Hale

Michael Mallett, Cecil H Clough, David Chambers (editors), London 1993

While the majority of these essays are about wars fought against Venice's enemies or on the building and defence of Venetian and other fortifications, there are also essays on other aspects of Venetian life and art: on Giorgione's earliest work; on the career of a Venetian pope; on the building of the Ca' d'Oro; and on the Diarii of Marino Sanuto.

 

 

 

 

Mallett, Michael - 05 - Mercenaries and Their Masters: Warfare in Renaissance Italy

Mercenaries and their Masters 
Mercenaries and Their Masters: Warfare in Renaissance Italy

Michael Mallett, The Bodley Head Ltd, 1974

Michael Mallett's classic study of Renaissance warfare in Italy is as relevant today as it was when it was first published a generation ago. His lucid account of the age of the condottieri - the mercenary captains of fortune - and of the soldiers who fought under them is set in the wider context of the Italian society of the time and of the warring city-states who employed them. A fascinating picture emerges of the mercenaries themselves, of their commanders and their campaigns, but also of the way in which war was organized and practised in the Renaissance world. The book concentrates on the fifteenth century, a confused period of turbulence and transition when standing armies were formed in Italy and more modern types of military organisation took hold across Europe. But it also looks back to the middle ages and the fourteenth century, and forward to the Italian wars of the sixteenth century when foreign armies disputed the European balance of power on Italian soil. Michael Mallett's pioneering study, which embodies much scholarly research into this neglected, often misunderstood subject, is essential reading for any one who is keen to understand the history of warfare in the late medieval period and the Renaissance.

 

Mallett, Michael - 06 - The Borgias: The Rise and Fall of a Renaissance Dynasty

The Borgias 1The Borgias 2The Borgias 4

 
The Borgias: The Rise and Fall of a Renaissance Dynasty

Michael Mallett, London 1969

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Mallett, Michael - 07 - The Florentine Galleys in the Fifteenth Century: With the Diary of Luca Di Maso Degli Albizzi, Captain of the Galleys,1429-1430

The Florentine Galleys 
The Florentine Galleys in the Fifteenth Century: With the Diary of Luca Di Maso Degli Albizzi, Captain of the Galleys,1429-1430

Michael Mallett, Oxford 1967

 

 

 

 

 

 

McFarlane, Anthony - 01 - War and Independence In Spanish America

War and Independence 
War and Independence In Spanish America

Anthony McFarlane, Routledge, 2013

During the period from 1808 to 1826, the Spanish empire was convulsed by wars throughout its dominions in Iberia and the Americas. The conflicts began in Spain, where Napoleon’s invasion triggered a war of national resistance. The collapse of the Spanish monarchy provoked challenges to the colonial regime in virtually all of Spain's American provinces, and colonial demands for autonomy and independence led to political turbulence and violent confrontation on a transcontinental scale. During the two decades after 1808, Spanish America witnessed warfare on a scale not seen since the conquests three centuries earlier.

War and Independence in Spanish America provides a unified account of war in Spanish America during the period after the collapse of the Spanish government in 1808. McFarlane traces the courses and consequences of war, combining a broad narrative of the development and distribution of armed conflict with analysis of its characteristics and patterns. He maps the main arenas of war, traces the major campaigns by and crucial battles between rebels and royalists, and places the military conflicts in the context of international political change. Readers will come away with a fully realized understanding of how war and military mobilization affected Spanish American societies and shaped the emerging independent states.

 

McFarlane, Anthony - 02 - Colombia Before Independence: Economy, Society, and Politics under Bourbon Rule

Colombia 
Colombia Before Independence: Economy, Society, and Politics under Bourbon Rule

Anthony McFarlane, Cambridge University Press 2002

This book describes and analyses economic and political developments in Colombia during the final century of Spanish rule. Its purpose is threefold: first, to provide a general portrait of Colombian society during the late colonial period, showing the character of economic, social, and political life in the territory's principal regions; second, to assess the impact on the region of European imperialist expansion during the eighteenth century; and third, to provide a context for understanding the causes of independence. The book offers the only available survey of Colombian history and historiography for this period.

 
 

McFarlane, Anthony - 03 - Independence and Revolution in Spanish America: Perspectives and Problems (Nineteenth-Century Latin America)

Independence and Revolution in Spanish America 
Independence and Revolution in Spanish America: Perspectives and Problems (Nineteenth-Century Latin America)

Anthony McFarlane, Eduardo Pasabo-Carbo (editors), Institute for the Study of the Americas, 1998

The essays in this volume re-examine, from a number of different angles, the process of Independence in Spanish America. The focus is to a large extent on the consequences of the wars of Independence for the newly established republics. However, the first section deals with a critical review of the historiography, the 'revolutionary' nature of Independence, and the comparative elements of Independence in the Americas. The remainder of the book examines the development of the wars and the impact that Independence had on political instability, culture, citizenship and the formation of new nations. In addition to general chapters, there are individual chapters devoted to New Granada, Venezuela, Mexico, Chile and Argentina. Contributors include: Timothy Anna, University of Manitoba; David Bushnell, formerly University of Florida; Rebecca Earle, University of Warwick; Klaus Gallo, Universidad Torcuato Di Tella, Buenos Aires; Francois-Xavier Guerra, Sorbonne & University of Paris I; Veronique Hebrard, University of Paris I; Alfredo Jocelyn-Holt, Universities of Santiago de Chile, Talca & Diego Portales; John Lynch, University of London.

 

McFarlane, Anthony - 04 - The British in the Americas 1480-1815

The British in the Americas 
The British in the Americas 1480-1815

Anthony McFarlane, Routledge 1994

Of northern European nations, the British had the greatest impact on the Americas. Their history there embraces far more than the colonies that became the United States: England had been in the New World for a century before those colonies were established, and the British presence long outlived their loss. This integrated account of that involvement spans the entire arc of British territories from the Caribbean to Canada, and the entire period from the first appearance of the English to the disintegration of the British and other Euro-American empires. A fascinating story, engrossingly told, it fills a major gap in current historiography.

 

 

O

Okey, Robin - 01 - Taming Balkan Nationalism: The Habsburg 'Civilizing Mission' in Bosnia 1878-1914

Taming Balkan Nationalism 
Taming Balkan Nationalism: The Habsburg 'Civilizing Mission' in Bosnia 1878-1914

Robin Okey, OUP, 2007

Concentrating on the politics of the Habsburg Monarchy's self-proclaimed "cultural mission" in occupied Bosnia in the period from 1878 to the outbreak of war in 1914, Taming Balkan Nationalism addresses two related issues: the impact of "Europeanization" in a backward society and the crystallization of the identities which have since dominated Bosnian life.

On the basis of wide reading in the Austrian, Hungarian, and south Slav sources, including the Hungarian-language papers of the two leading administrators of Bosnia, Benjamin von Kállay and István Burián, Robin Okey provides fresh and wide-ranging perspectives on a whole range of issues, including the "Orientalist" assumptions of Austrian policy, the struggle of administrators for the moral high ground with nascent Serb and Croat intelligentsias, Kállay's controversial policy of the "Bosnian nation", and the strategy and personality of the intriguing Burián. He also opens up the hitherto unexplored background to student terrorism in the secondary schools of pre-1914 Bosnia, from which the assassin of Archduke Franz Ferdinand was to emerge.

Beyond this immediate historical context, the book also sheds much light on wider issues such as the construction of Serb and Croat nationhood in Bosnia, the beginnings of the Europeanization of Bosnian Muslims, and the new divisions created by the rapid pace of social, economic, and intellectual change as the nineteenth turned into the twentieth century.

 

Okey, Robin - 02 - The Demise of Communist East Europe: 1989 in Context

The Demise of Communist East Europe 
The Demise of Communist East Europe: 1989 in Context

Robin Okey, Hodder Arnold, 2004

In 1989 communism crumbled in Eastern Europe and with it one of the most conspicuous legacies of the Second World War. This book charts the demise of East European communism and analyses the failure of the communist experiment, the revolutionary events of 1989 and the post-communist aftermath as the legacy of both these processes.

Starting from the premise that communism's proclaimed egalitarian, modernizing goals always enjoyed more support than the one-party politics through which these goals were pursued, Robin Okey explains communism's initial ability to survive crises but then its cumulative decline in the face of dissidence, economic weakness and reform movements, and, after 1989, the growing divergence between the northern and Balkan states, the revival of ex-communist parties as the new liberalism faltered, and the repeated failure of academics to anticipate these shifts. By analysing these issues in the context of the region's drive since the nineteenth century to catch up with Western Europe, this book concludes that the events of 1989 can cast light more widely still on the fortunes of the three great ideas that the continent as a whole derived from revolutionary France: liberalism, socialism and nationalism.

 

Okey, Robin - 03 - The Habsburg Monarchy, c.1765-1918: From Enlightenment to Eclipse

The Habsburg Monarchy 
The Habsburg Monarchy, c.1765-1918: From Enlightenment to Eclipse

Robin Okey, Macmillan 2000

The multi-national Habsburg empire has never lost its fascination since its fall in 1918. Robin Okey's book shows how the Habsburg peoples experienced the same social, economic and political processes as most other Europeans, in ways that cast interesting light on these processes from both the European and the Habsburg angle. Opposing views that the national problem was therefore subordinate to underlying socio-economic backwardness, Okey argues for the inextricable entanglement of the two themes, as nationalism emerged from a process of social mobilisation which threatened the position of dominant Austro-Germans and Magyars. Robin Okey brings a distinctive approach to an intriguing subject, in a comprehensive study based on wide reading in most of the Monarchy's languages.

 
 

Okey, Robin - 04 - Crisis in Eastern Europe: Roots and Prospects

Crisis in Eastern Europe 
Crisis in Eastern Europe: Roots and Prospects

Robin Okey, The Social Market Foundation 1990

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Okey, Robin - 05 - Eastern Europe 1740-1985

Eastern Europe 1740-1980Eastern Europe 1740-1985 
Eastern Europe 1740-1980 (first edition)

Eastern Europe 1740-1985 (second edition)

Eastern Europe 1740-1985 (Japanese edition)

Robin Okey, Hutchinson 1982, Hutchinson 1986, Keiso Shobo 1987

Organised around the twin themes of modernisation and nationalism, this book offers a historical survey of territories between the Baltic and the Aegean, occupied by Modern Poland, Czechoslovakia, Austria, Hungary, Romania, Yugoslavia, Bulgaria and Albania, from 1740 to the present.

 

R

Reid, Fred - 01 - Thomas Hardy and History

Thomas Hardy and History 
Thomas Hardy and History

Fred Reid, Palgrave Macmillan 2017

This book addresses the questions 'What did Thomas Hardy think about history and how did this enter into his writings?' Scholars have sought answers in 'revolutionary', 'gender', 'postcolonial' and 'millennial' criticism, but these are found to be unsatisfactory. Fred Reid is a historian who seeks answers by setting Hardy more fully in the discourses of philosophical history and the domestic and international affairs of Britain. He shows how Hardy worked out, from the late 1850s, his own 'meliorist' philosophy of history and how it is inscribed in his fiction. Rooted in the idea of cyclical history as propounded by the Liberal Anglican historians, it was adapted after his loss of faith through reading the works of Auguste Comte, George Drysdale and John Stuart Mill and used to defend the right of individuals to break with the Victorian sexual code and make their own 'experiments in living'.

 

Reid, Fred - 02 - In Search of Willie Patterson: A Scottish Soldier in the Age of Imperialism

In Search of Willie Patterson 
In Search of Willie Patterson: A Scottish Soldier in the Age of Imperialism

Fred Reid, Cualann Press 2002

Fred Reid was curious about his grandfather, Corporal Willie Patterson. Knowing him only from his mother's stories of the 'black sheep of the family', he wondered if there was a better side to the man. When he discovered that Willie had won the Military Medal in the First World War, he decided to research his life. This book is more than the fascinating story of a man who struggled to rise from a semi-literate background in Calton, Glasgow, to be a war hero and a white-collar worker. The author, who is blind, also tells of his own confrontation with the archives and of his safari over seven thousand miles of East Africa to find the grandfather he had never known.

 

Reid, Fred - 03 - Keir Hardie: The Making of a Socialist

Keir Hardie - The Making of a Socialist 
Keir Hardie: The Making of a Socialist

Fred Reid, Croom Helm Social History Series 1978

 

 

 

 

 

 

S

Scarisbrick, J J - 01 - History of the Diocese of Birmingham

History of the Diocese of Birmingham 
History of the Diocese of Birmingham

J J Scarisbrick (editor), Editions du Signe 2008

This book has been produced by the Archdiocese of Birmingham Historical Commision. Its members have written most of the chapters and most of the brief histories of the parish churches of the diocese, which form the second half of the book. Contributions from Dr. Margaret Worsley who wrote the chapter on Education and Social Care and Mrs. Helen Harwood who wrote the chapter on the churches of Stafford deanery.

 

Scarisbrick, J J - 02 - Law and Government under the Tudors: Essays Presented to Sir Geoffrey Elton on his Retirement

Law and Government under the Tudors 
Law and Government under the Tudors: Essays Presented to Sir Geoffrey Elton on his Retirement

J J Scarisbrick, Claire Cross, David Loades (editors), Cambridge University Press 2002

This is a collection of specially commissioned research essays by scholars on the government of Tudor England, designed as a tribute from a group of advanced students to their supervisor. Professor Sir Geoffrey Elton, to whom the volume is dedicated, is internationally celebrated, and the most influential living historian of the period. Each essay reflects the special interest of the author, within the broader theme of 'Law and Government'. The book will be read by many who have been influenced by Professor Elton's teaching, but who may not necessarily be students or historians of Tudor England.

 

Scarisbrick, J J - 03 - Selly Park And Beyond; The Story Of Genevieve Dupuis And The Congregation Of The Sisters Of Charity Of St. Paul The Apostle

Selly Park and Beyond 
Selly Park And Beyond; The Story Of Genevieve Dupuis And The Congregation Of The Sisters Of Charity Of St. Paul The Apostle

J J Scarisbrick, Sisters of Charity of St. Paul the Apostle 1997

Published to celebrate the 150th anniversary of the foundation of the Congregation.

 

 

Scarisbrick, J J - 04 - The Reformation and the English People

The Reformation and the English People 
The Reformation and the English People

J J Scarisbrick, Wiley-Blackwell 1991

The complex web of events which we call the Reformation had a profound and lasting effect on English life. This book is a new attempt to understand how it 'happened' and how English men and women responded to it. Using the evidence of wills and account-books, examining late medieval church building and, above all, the striking popularity of the lay fraternity, Professor Scarisbrick argues that there was little violent discontent with the old Church on the eve of the Reformation - that, on the whole, English layfolk had been able to fashion a Church which suited their needs well enough. The main thrust for the ensuring changes came from 'above' and was rarely accompanied by the fierce anticlericialism and iconoclasm that was often a feature of the continental Reformation.

Professor Scarisbrick examines the unparalleled spoliation of religious houses, shrines, colleges, chantries, guilds and parish churches in the years 1536 to 1553, and lay attitudes to it. He argues that the changes encountered more resistance than has often been supposed. The story of what happened to schools and hospitals in Edward VI's reign and the survival and revival of the old faith under (and after) Mary add weight to his arguments. He shows clearly that to describe the Reformation as a victory of layman over cleric is far too simple, and that many of our common assumptions about the Reformation need to be reconsidered.

 

Scarisbrick, J J - 05 - The Jesuits and the Catholic Reformation

The Jesuits and the Catholic Reformation 
The Jesuits and the Catholic Reformation

J J Scarisbrick, The Historical Association 1988

 

 

 

 

 

 

Scarisbrick, J J - 06 - Wealth and Power in Tudor England: Essays Presented to S. T. Bindoff

Wealth and Power in Tudor England 
Wealth and Power in Tudor England: Essays Presented to S. T. Bindoff

J J Scarisbrick, E W Ives, R J Knecht (editors), Athlone Press 1978

 

 

 

 

 

 
 

Scarisbrick, J J - 07 - Henry VIII

Henry VIII 
Henry VIII

J J Scarisbrick, 1968

First published in 1968, Jack Scarisbrick's "Henry VIII" is a book which focuses on the personality of this flamboyant and forceful monarch, exploring an impulsive interventionist king whose impact on the government, society and religion of England is felt more than four centuries on.

 

 

 

 

Smith, Iain - 01 - The Siege of Mafeking, Two Volumes

The Siege of Mafeking 
The Siege of Mafeking, Two Volumes

Iain Smith (editor), The Brenthurst Press 2001

When the opening shots of the South African War reverberated across the world on 12 October 1899, the small, dusty border town of Mafeking, with the adjacent Baralong settlement, was garrisoned and plunged into the privations, dangers and destruction of a siege. Although not of major military importance, the seven-month-long siege became one of the most famous episodes of the war, and the fate of the town assumed a symbolic importance for Britain and the Empire. During the ensuing century, it has aroused extreme reactions, and the conduct of the British garrison and its colourful commanding officer, Colonel Robert Baden-Powell, has been both glorified and vilified.

To mark the centenary of the South African War 1899-1902, The Brenthurst Press revisited this controversial episode with a comprehensive re-examination of the Siege of Mafeking, inspired initially by a major manuscript collection in The Brenthurst Library. The archive of Baden-Powell's second-in-command, Lieutenant-Colonel Courtenay Vyvyan, whose achievements have been largely overshadowed by his famous and flamboyant superior officer, is one of the most comprehensive single archives on the siege. It has been used with innumerable other sources by the nine authors, five in Britain, four in South Africa, all authorities in their fields, as the basis for an updated review of the collective and individual experiences of the siege and the interpretation of its various aspects. New research has resulted in a richly detailed work of scholarly importance, which is at the same time highly readable and entertaining.

 

Smith, Iain - 02 - The Origins of the South African War 1899-1902

The Origins of the South African War 1899-1902 
The Origins of the South African War 1899-1902

Iain Smith, Longman 1995

Iain Smith's impressive reappraisal of the origins of what used to be known as the Anglo-Boer War is based on extensive work in the British and South African archives. While paying due attention to the roots of the conflict in the pattern of European conquest and settlement in South Africa, he concentrates particularly on the transformations that resulted from the discovery of gold in the Transvaal during the high noon of British imperialism and the scramble for Africa. The mounting conflict of interests between Britain and what had been a poor Boer republic makes a dramatic story with a cast of powerful personalities that includes Rhodes, Chamberlain, Kruger, Smuts and Milner. Iain Smith does it and them full justice in this authoritative and enthralling account of one of the climatic moments in South African and British imperial history.

 
 

Smith, Iain - 03 - The Emin Pasha Relief Expedition 1886-1890

The Emin Pasha Relief Expedition 1886-1890 
The Emin Pasha Relief Expedition 1886-1890

Iain Smith, Clarendon Press 1972

 

 

 

 

 

 
 

Steedman, Carolyn - 01 - Poetry for Historians: Or, W. H. Auden and History

Poetry for Historians 
Poetry for Historians: Or, W. H. Auden and History

Carolyn Steedman, Manchester University Press 2018

This is a book about the conflict between history and poetry - and historians and poets - in Atlantic World society from the end of the seventeenth century to the present day. Blending historiography and theory, it proceeds by asking: what is the point of poetry as far as historians are concerned? The focus is on W. H. Auden's Cold War-era history poems, but the book also looks at other poets from the seventeenth century onwards, providing original accounts of their poetic and historical educations. An important resource for those teaching undergraduate and postgraduate courses in historiography and history and theory, Poetry for historians will also be of relevance to courses on literature in society and the history of education. General readers will relate it to Steedman's Landscape for a Good Woman (1987) and Dust (2001), on account of its biographical and autobiographical insights into the way history operates in modern society.
 

Steedman, Carolyn - 02 - An Everyday Life of the English Working Class: Work, Self and Sociability in the Early Nineteenth Century

An Everyday Life of the English Working Class 
An Everyday Life of the English Working Class: Work, Self and Sociability in the Early Nineteenth Century

Carolyn Steedman, Cambridge University Press 2013

This book concerns two men, a stockingmaker and a magistrate, who both lived in a small English village at the turn of the nineteenth century. It focuses on Joseph Woolley the stockingmaker, on his way of seeing and writing the world around him, and on the activities of magistrate Sir Gervase Clifton, administering justice from his country house Clifton Hall. Using Woolley's voluminous diaries and Clifton's magistrate records, Carolyn Steedman gives us a unique and fascinating account of working-class living and loving, and getting and spending. Through Woolley and his thoughts on reading and drinking, sex, the law and social relations, she challenges traditional accounts which she argues have overstated the importance of work to the working man's understanding of himself, as a creature of time, place and society. She shows instead that, for men like Woolley, law and fiction were just as critical as work in framing everyday life.

 

Steedman, Carolyn - 03 - Labours Lost: Domestic Service and the Making of Modern England

Labours Lost 
Labours Lost: Domestic Service and the Making of Modern England

Carolyn Steedman, Cambridge University Press 2009

This is a unique account of the hidden history of servants and their employers in late eighteenth-century England and of how servants thought about and articulated their resentments. It is a book which encompasses state formation and the maidservant pounding away at dirty nappies in the back kitchen; taxes on the servant's labour and the knives he cleaned, the water he fetched, and the privy he shovelled out. Carolyn Steedman shows how deeply entwined all of these entities, objects and people were in the imagination of those doing the shovelling and pounding and in the political philosophies that attempted to make sense of it all. Rather than fitting domestic service into conventional narratives of `industrial revolution' or `the making of the English working class' she offers instead a profound re-reading of this formative period in English social history which restores the servants' lost labours to their rightful place.

 

Steedman, Carolyn - 04 - Master and Servant: Love and Labour in the English Industrial Age

Master and Servant 
Master and Servant: Love and Labour in the English Industrial Age

Carolyn Steedman, Cambridge University Press 2007

Leading historian Carolyn Steedman offers a fascinating and compelling account of love, life and domestic service in eighteenth-century England. This 2007 book, situated in the regional and chronological epicentre of E. P. Thompson's The Making of the English Working Class and Emily Bronte's Wuthering Heights, focuses on the relationship between a Church of England clergyman (the Master of the title) and his pregnant maidservant in the late eighteenth century. This case-study of people behaving in ways quite contrary to the standard historical account sheds new light on the much wider historical questions of Anglicanism as social thought, the economic history of the industrial revolution, domestic service, the poor law, literacy, education, and the very making of the English working class. It offers a unique meditation on the relationship between history and literature and will be of interest to scholars and students of industrial England, social and cultural history and English literature.

 

Steedman, Carolyn - 05 - Dust: The Archive and Cultural History

Dust 
Dust: The Archive and Cultural History

Carolyn Steedman, Manchester University Press 2001

In this witty, engaging, and challenging book, Carolyn Steedman has produced an originaland sometimes irreverentinvestigation into how modern historiography has developed. Dust: The Archive and Cultural History considers our stubborn set of beliefs about an objective material worldinherited from the nineteenth centurywith which modern history writing and its lack of such a belief, attempts to grapple. Drawing on her own published and unpublished writing, Carolyn Steedman has produced a sustained argument about the way in which history writing belongs to the currents of thought shaping the modern world.

Steedman begins by asserting that in recent years much attention has been paid to the archive by those working in the humanities and social sciences; she calls this practice "archivization." By definition, the archive is the repository of "that which will not go away," and the book goes on to suggest that, just like dust, the "matter of history" can never go away or be erased.

This unique work will be welcomed by all historians who want to think about what it is they do.

 

Steedman, Carolyn - 06 - Strange Dislocations. Childhood and the Idea of Human Interiority, 1780-1930

Strange Dislocations 
Strange Dislocations. Childhood and the Idea of Human Interiority, 1780-1930

Carolyn Steedman, Harvard University Press 1995

In this study, the author takes as the starting point the idea of childhood and its history which, she argues, has much less to do with actual children than with adult concepts of the self and the way they have developed since the end of the 18th century.

Using the perspectives of social and cultural history, psychoanalysis and the history of psychology - and the history of a child who never actually existed, the strange, disturbed child Mignon from Goethe's "Wilhelmeister" - the book discusses a search for the self, for a past that is long and gone, and the ways in which, over the last 200 hundred years, the lost object/essence/vision has come to assume the shape and form of a child.

 

 

Steedman, Carolyn - 07 - Childhood, Culture and Class in Britain: Margaret McMillan, 1860-1931

Childhood, Culture and Class in Britain 
Childhood, Culture and Class in Britain: Margaret McMillan, 1860-1931

Carolyn Steedman, Virago 1990

At the end of the 19th century, Margaret McMillan, charismatic member of the Independent Labour Party and socialist propagandist, played a key role in the betterment of children through her writing, her political activism, and her work for the children of Bradford and London. Her passionate belief that children's lives could be transformed by fresh air, cleanliness and emotional nurturing led her to champion their cause through her prolific writing and speaking, and to create, in the slums of Deptford, a garden for underprivileged children, through whom she reclaimed her own lost childhood. Taking McMillan's life and work as her starting point, Carolyn Steedman explores a profund tranformation in Western sensibility, and looks at the psychological and political fate of this woman who devoted her life to children.

 

 

Steedman, Carolyn - 08 - The Radical Soldier's Tale: John Pearman, 1819-1908

The Radical Soldier 
The Radical Soldier's Tale: John Pearman, 1819-1908

Carolyn Steedman, Routledge 1988

Autobiography of John Peerman, working-class radical and republican, also soldier and policeman. Carolyn Steedman introduces the 'Memoirs' by placing the document in its textual historical and political context.

 

 

 

 

Steedman, Carolyn - 09 - Landscape for a Good Woman

Landscape for a Good Woman 
Landscape for a Good Woman

Carolyn Steedman, Virago 1986

Intricate and inspiring, this unusual book uses autobiographical elements to depict a mother and her daughter and two working-class childhoods (Burnley in the 1920s, South London in the 1950s) and to find a place for their stories in history and politics, in psychoanalysis and feminism.

 

 

 

 

Steedman, Carolyn - 10 - Policing the Victorian Community: Formation of English Provincial Police Forces, 1856-80

Policing the Victorian Community 
Policing the Victorian Community: Formation of English Provincial Police Forces, 1856-80

Carolyn Steedman, Law Book Co of Australasia 1984

 

 

 

 

 
 

Steedman, Carolyn - 11 - The Tidy House

The Tidy House 
The Tidy House

Carolyn Steedman, Virago 1983

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

T

Thomson, Guy - 01 - La Sierra de Puebla en la política de México en el siglo XIX

Blank 
La Sierra de Puebla en la política de México en el siglo XIX

Guy Thomson, Sociedad y Cultura, Puebla, 2010

 

 

 

Thomson, Guy - 02 - The Birth of Modern Politics in Spain: Democracy, Association and Revolution, 1854-75

The Birth of Modern Politics in Spain 
The Birth of Modern Politics in Spain: Democracy, Association and Revolution, 1854-75

Guy Thomson, Palgrave Macmillan 2009

This book challenges the view of Spain as backward, 'timeless' and isolated from wider European movements; impervious to modernity. By tracing the diffusion of democratic ideas and republican associations in the towns and villages of eastern Andalucia between 1854 and 1875, Spain is shown to have shared fully in Europe's mid-nineteenth century democratic enthusiasm. Small town Democrats captured the imagination hundreds of thousands of rural people who viewed politics as an esoteric pastime occupying only the wealthy and the educated. They achieved this by using the press for delivering their message, by organizing clandestine Carbonari societies for extending their support and fighting elections, by preparing for summer (mostly abortive) popular insurrections, and by dramatising the analogy between the Italian Risorgimento and Spain's own regeneration. Hence, during the two decades of political conflict that preceded the 'Glorious' Revolution of September 1868, Spain moved from patrician to mass politics.

The book explores this political awakening by tracing the heated rivalry between two neighbours from Granada's second city of Loja, the centre of the region of study. The lives of Conservative chieftain General Ramón Maria Narváez, Duke of Valencia, appointed seven times as First Minister by Queen Isabel, and Rafael Pérez del Alamo, a veterinarian blacksmith who in July 1861 led Spain's first civilian 'socialist' mass uprising, exemplify the two competing visions of political modernity that divided Spain during nineteenth Century, and had such tragic consequences for the twentieth.

 

Thomson, Guy - 03 - Visiones del liberalismo. Política, identidad y cultura en la España del siglo XIX

Visiones del liberalismo 
Visiones del liberalismo. Política, identidad y cultura en la España del siglo XIX

Guy Thomson and Alda Blanco (editors), University of Valencia 2008

 

 

 

 

 

 

Thomson, Guy - 04 - The European Revolutions of 1848 and the Americas

The European Revolutions of 1848 and the Americas 
The European Revolutions of 1848 and the Americas

Guy Thomson (editor), Institute for the Study of the Americas 2001

Very little has been written on the impact of the European revolutions of 1848 on the Americas. Nevertheless, their influence, particularly in the case of France, as palpable. The revolutions of 1848 renewed and extended democratic vocabulary and republican symbolism from Canada to Chile. This collection looks at the catalytic effect of Europe's 'springtime of the peoples' in the Americas, prompting the disenfranchised to demand representative institutions and to conceive of themselves as sovereign people, and giving rise to radical and progressive liberal parties - the Free Soil Movement/Free Democrats in the United States, the Reform Liberals in Mexico, the 'progresista' liberal parties in Colombia and Peru, the 'Society of Equality' and the Radical Party in Chile - that challenged the political groupings that had served since Independence.

 
 

Patriotism, Politics and Popular Liberalism in Nineteenth-Century MexicoEl Liberalismo Popular Mexicano 
Patriotism, Politics and Popular Liberalism in Nineteenth-Century Mexico: Juan Francisco Lucas and the Puebla Sierra

Guy Thomson with David G La France, Scholarly Resources Inc. 1999
 

El liberalismo popular mexicano en el siglo XIX. Juan Francisco Lucas y la Sierra de Puebla (Spanish edition)

Guy Thomson with David G La France, Universidad Autónoma de Puebla & Educación y Cultura, Puebla, 2010

This detailed local study of state formation in nineteenth-century Mexico focuses on the life of Juan Francisco Lucas, the principal Indian leader of the Puebla Sierra between 1854 and 1917. The book illustrates how, over seventy years, the Indian communities of the Puebla Sierra, through the leadership of Lucas, compelled their political leaders to execute the mandates of the liberal state on terms that were locally acceptable. The text also provides a detailed look at the patriotism, politics, and popular liberalism which flourished during this period in Mexican history. This is the first in-depth study to examine the great nineteenth-century divisions between liberals and conservatives and radical and moderate liberals over an extended time period and in a rural, multi-ethnic setting. The text also explores how these divisions reemerged during the Mexican Revolution. The volume shows the rise of Mexican nationalism and what rights and responsibilities it extended to individual Mexicans and independent communities. Through close attention to the political and human geography of the Puebla Sierra, Professor Thomson observes the continuities between the Sierra's colonial past and the present, and the interactions between key political individuals and a complex physical environment.

 

Thomson, Guy - 06 - Puebla de los Angeles. Industry and Society in a Mexican City, 1700-1850

Puebla de los Angeles 
Puebla de los Angeles. Industry and Society in a Mexican City, 1700-1850

Guy Thomson, Westview Press, 1989

Puebla de los Angeles. Industria y Sociedad de una Ciudad Mexicana, 1700-1850 (Spanish edition)

Guy Thomson, Universidad Autónoma de Puebla, 2002