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Themes & Approaches to the Historical Study of Empire (HI995)

Convenor

Dr Robert Fletcher, Associate Professor of Britain and Empire

Context of Module
Module Aims
Outline Syllabus
Intended Learning Outcomes
Illustrative Bibliography
Assessment
Context of Module

This spring term module introduces students to the study of empire during the early modern and modern periods. It is open to all MA students and may particularly appeal to those focusing on global history.

Module Aims

To widen and deepen students’ understanding of themes in the study of empire in history across chronological period and geographical area; to help students develop a conceptual and practical understanding of the skills of an historian of empire; to help students hone their ability to formulate and achieve a piece of critical and reflective historiographical writing; to support students in developing the ability to undertake critical analysis; to help students develop the ability to formulate and test concepts and hypotheses.

Intended Learning Outcomes

By the end of this module, students will be able to demonstrate a conceptual and practical understanding of the skills of an historian of empire; demonstrate the ability to formulate and achieve a piece of critical and reflective historiographical writing; demonstrate the ability to undertake critical analysis; demonstrate the ability to formulate and test concepts and hypotheses.

Illustrative Bibliography
Anderson, Michael, “Islamic Law and the Colonial Encounter in British India,” in Institutions and Ideologies, ed. David Arnold and Peter Robb (Curzon, 1993), 165-85.
Arondekar, Anjali, For the Record: Sexuality and the Colonial Archive in India (Duke UP, 2009).
Benton, Lauren and Richard J. Ross, Legal Pluralism and Empires, 1500-1850 (New York University Press, 2013).
Bethencourt, Francisco, The Inquisition: A Global History, 1478-1834 (Cambridge UP, 2009).
Cesaire, Aime, Discourse on Colonialism (Monthly Review Press, 1972, 2000)
Clendinnen, Inga, ‘‘Fierce and Unnatural Cruelty’: Cortés and the Conquest of Mexico’, Representations, vol. 33 (1991), pp. 65-100.
Brown, Christopher Leslie, Moral Capital: Foundations of British Abolitionism (University of North Carolina Press, 2006).
Clossey, Luke, Salvation and Globalization in the Early Jesuit Missions (Cambridge UP, 2008).
Cohn, Bernard, Colonialism and its Forms of Knowledge: The British in India (Princeton UP, 1996).
Crossley, Pamela Kyle et al, Empire at the Margins: Culture, Ethnicity and Frontier in Early Modern China (University of California Press, 2006).
Everill, Bronwen, Abolition and Empire in Sierra Leone and Liberia (Palgrave Macmillan, 2013).
Fanon, Frantz, The Wretched of the Earth (Penguin, 1967).
Gandhi, Mohandas Karamchand, Hind Swaraj and Other Writings (Cambridge UP, 2009).
Gilroy, Paul, There Ain’t No Black in the Union Jack: The Cultural Politics of Race and Nation (Hutchinson, 1987).
Hevia, James, English Lessons: The Pedagogy of Imperialism in Nineteenth-Century China (Duke UP, 2003).
Hunt, Nancy Rose, A Colonial Lexicon: Of Birth Ritual, Medicalization and Mobility in the Congo (Duke UP, 1999).
Magee, G.B. and A.S. Thompson, Empire and Globalization: Networks of People, Goods and Capital in the British World, c. 1850-1914 (Cambridge UP, 2010).
Memmi, Albert, The Colonizer and the Colonized (Earthscan, 2003).
Riello, Giorgio, Cotton: The Fabric that Made the Modern World (Cambridge UP, 2013).
Said, Edward, Orientalism (Penguin, 2003).
Said, Edward, Culture and Imperialism (Knopf, 1993).
Waley-Cohen, Joanna, The Culture of War in China: Empire and the Military under the Qing Dynasty (IB Tauris, 2006).
Assessment

One 6000 word assessed essay, to be submitted by Friday 24 April 2019.

Tutors: Robert Fletcher
Term: Spring Term
Day: Wednesday
Time: 09:00-11:00
Room: Tutor's Offices. See syllabus for venue

Any reschedules will be noted in the Outline Syllabus