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Expert Comment


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Why we need to stop panic buying - expert comment

Pictures of empty supermarket shelves, and stories of supermarkets putting limits on items dominates the news as people stockpile due to Coronavirus.
Jan Godsell, Professor of Operations and Supply Chain Strategy at WMG, University of Warwick offers her expert comment on why it needs to stop.

Wed 18 Mar 2020, 15:36 | Tags: Supply Chains, Expert comment, WMG, Sciences, Food, coronavirus, Supermarket

CO₂ in the supply chain - expert comment:

Janet Godsell, Professor of Operations and Supply Chain Strategy at WMG at the University of Warwick, comments on the importance of commodity products like CO₂ and how the interplay between supply chains needs to be considered to keep products on shelves.

Fri 29 Jun 2018, 11:37 | Tags: Supply Chains, industry, WMG

"Airbus was always likely to be the inward investor international firm most susceptible to Brexit" - expert comment from Professor Nigel Driffield

"Airbus was always likely to be the inward investor international firm most susceptible to Brexit." Professor Nigel Driffield, Professor of International Business at Warwick Business School, explores the implications of a no-deal Brexit for the Airbus supply chain.


Tesco 'Prioritised Finances' Over Suppliers, Professor Godsell is available to comment

Britain's largest supermarket Tesco has "seriously breached" a legally-binding code to protect grocery producers by prioritising its own finances over the fair treatment of its suppliers, a new report has found. Professor Janet Godsell, of WMG at the University of Warwick is available for expert comment.

Tue 26 Jan 2016, 12:00 | Tags: Academic Staff, News, Supply Chains, Expert comment

Professor Nigel Driffield from the Warwick Business School shares some thoughts on the chancellor inviting China to bid for HS2 contracts

The first issue to address is whether this is seeking to attract trade or foreign investment. The wording of the text is that they want Chinese companies to tender for certain parts of the infrastructure, which essentially suggests trade – ie importing sub-assemblies, components, even trains from China (or the lines themselves).


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