Please read our student and staff community guidance on COVID-19
Skip to main content Skip to navigation

Life Sciences News

See our Latest Journal Publications and Film and Audio

Select tags to filter on

Double success at Three Minute Thesis (3MT) competition

The 3MT develops academic, presentation, and research communication skills by challenging students to effectively explain their research in engaging, accessible language to a non-specialist audience.
This year, both winners came from SLS:

  • Congratulations to the winner - Rohini Ajaykumar on 'Studying bacterial resistance for antimicrobial drug development'.
  • And the runner up and popular choice winner - Scott Dwyer on 'Controlling honey bee parasites : will the mites meet their match?'.

Find out more about 3MT 


Minimum energy requirements for microbial communities to live predicted

Orkun SoyerA microbial community is a complex, dynamic system composed of hundreds of species and their interactions, they are found in oceans, soil, animal guts and plant roots. Each system feeds the Earth’s ecosystem and their own growth, as they each have their own metabolism that underpin biogeochemical cycles.

Professor Orkun Soyer and colleagues have produced a thermodynamic model for simulating the dynamics of microbial communities.

Press Release


Thesis Prize Winners

Every year, the Faculty of Science, Engineering and Medicine, and the School of Life Sciences, jointly run a PhD Thesis Prize competition with prizes provided by each. Supervisors are invited to put forward students for consideration.

This year, the winner of the Faculty Thesis Prize is Dr Fábio Henrique dos Santos Rodrigues, who did his PhD with Prof John McCarthy. The thesis title is 'Targeting trypanosomatid translation factor interactions'. The work has been published in a joint first author paper in Nucleic Acids Research.

The winner of the School of Life Sciences Thesis Prize is Dr Jenny Goodman, who did her PhD with Dr Alex Jones. Jenny's thesis is entitled 'The role of Feronia in regulating growth and development in Arabidopsis Thaliana roots'. A methods paper and a middle author paper have already come from the PhD, and two first author papers – including one for PNAS – are in process.