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UK and Australia sign trade deal – Monash Warwick Alliance set to benefit

The UK has signed an historic trade agreement with Australia, which includes unprecedented opportunities for academic researchers to work between the two countries — which will boost the already successful Alliance between the Universities of Warwick and Monash.


Coventry’s Affordable Very Light Rail Track Unveiled

· As part of Coventry Very Light Rail (VLR), Coventry City Council’s flagship transport project, a novel track form has been designed and manufactured by researchers from WMG, University of Warwick, together with their design partners Ingerop/Rendel.


University of Warwick signs agreement with agronomy specialist to bring UK beans to market

The University of Warwick’s research commercialisation wing, Warwick Innovations, has signed a contract with agronomy specialist Agrii to promote the commercial production of UK haricot beans developed by scientists at the University of Warwick.


Revolutionising the manufacturing industry through digitalisation

Until now, smaller manufacturing companies have missed out on the productivity benefits of digital technologies and data-driven solutions. Too many manufacturers don’t know where to start, and lack the skills required to deploy and use digital solutions. The costs are perceived to be high and the return on investment is unclear. A consortium, including WMG at the University of Warwick, has been awarded funding through the Government’s Manufacturing Made Smarter Challenge to tackle this problem by developing a Smart InforMation PLatform and Ecosystem for Manufacturing (SIMPLE).

Wed 06 Jan 2021, 12:48 | Tags: manufacturing, UK, WMG, Batteries, digital, UKRI, Sciences

Chemical clues in leaves can reveal ash tree resistance to deadly disease

Naturally occurring compounds in ash leaves could be linked to susceptibility of individual trees to the fungal disease ash dieback (ADB). But selecting trees with lower levels of these compounds and breeding for resistance could leave the UK ash tree population open to attack from invading insect pests in the future, according to scientists at the University of Warwick.


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