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Suggested amendment to the Cinematograph Films Act, 1930

The 1927 Cinematograph Film Act required British cinemas to show a set minimum percentage of 'British' films (intended to be incrementally raised from 5% to 20% between 1929-1938), with the intention of encouraging investment into the struggling British film industry. One byproduct of the Act were the 'quota quickies', cheaply produced films which were quickly knocked out to fulfil the requirements (if not the intentions) of the legislation. The Act was repealed in 1960.

This statement was presented by the National Association of Theatrical Employees (NATE) to the 1930 Trades Union Congress (TUC) in support of a resolution to increase the minimum percentage of films "of British character" to at least 50%. NATE's suggested amendment argues that a quota system is needed to combat "iron monopoly", and prevent the majority of takings going to "American Syndicates". It also comments on the unemployment of artistes, orchestra members and stage staff caused by the "innovation and development of the Sound Film" and the decline of variety theatre.

Included in a file on an 'Enquiry into British film industry', 1927-1936, from the archive of the Trades Union Congress; document reference: MSS.292/675.8/2

Suggested amendment to the Cinematograph Films Act, 1930

Suggested amendment to the Cinematograph Films Act, 1930