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Origins of the Victorian women's movement

Overview:

A small number of pamphlets relating to the rights of women are included in the 'Political Pamphlets Collection' within University Library Special Collections (held at the Modern Records Centre). The Rev. Brooke Lambert collection of Victorian pamphlets (at the MRC) also includes material relating to debates over the role and treatment of women during the mid-late 19th century.

Catalogue = This symbol after a link means that it links to catalogue descriptions of the documents (including the reference numbers which will help you to order up the original documents at the MRC).

Digitised = This symbol after a link means that it links to digitised copies of the documents.

Selected sources:

Fifth annual report of the Executive Committee of the Manchester National Society for Women's Suffrage, 1872 Digitised

The annual report includes a list of subscribers and donors, and a list of petitions in favour of women's suffrage presented to parliament during the session of 1872.

'Journal of the Women's Education Union', no.1, January 1873 Digitised

Published for the National Union for Improving the Education of Women of All Classes. Includes information about the National Union, sub-committee reports, and short articles on 'The Chelsea School', 'Instruction by correspondence', 'The ladies' diet at Darmstadt' and 'Educational conferences in Germany'.

Objections to women's suffrage: a speech, 1874 Catalogue

Text of speech by Captain Frederick Maxse, given at the Electoral Reform Conference held at the Freemasons' Tavern, 17 November 1874, in opposition to an amendment moved by Miss Lydia Becker to admit all householders to vote, including women.

The rights and duties of women in local government, 1879 Catalogue

Text of speech by Lydia Becker, read at the Conference on behalf of extending the Parliamentary franchise to women, held in the Victoria Rooms, Clifton, Bristol, on 24 January 1879.

'A college for working women' by Frances Martin, 1879 Digitised

Article by one of the founders of the College for Working Women, reprinted from Macmillan's Magazine. The College was founded in 1874 after its predecessor, the Working Women's College, became co-educational.

Extract from the fifth annual report of the Executive Committee of the Manchester National Society for Women's Suffrage

Rules of the Manchester National Society for Women's Suffrage, included in their fifth annual report, 1872.