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Classics BA Part-time (Course Code: Varies by discipline)

Classics students and teaching staff studying an ancient object

Find out more about our BA (Hons) Classics (with Centre for Lifelong Learning)

The Department of Classics and Ancient History offers three degrees that can be studied part-time, and are designed to reflect your interests in Classical Civilisation, Ancient History and Classical Archaeology, or Classics.

This course contains face-to-face elements. We welcome applications from anyone who will be able to commit to these sessions.


Entry Requirements

This course has flexible entry requirements. Consideration will be given for non-traditional qualifications, work and life experience. Applicants are normally interviewed by the course selector.

For the Classics degree, applicants must have experience of learning an Ancient or Modern language to Advanced level. This could be via an A level in Latin, Ancient Greek, or a Modern foreign language, or an equivalent qualification.

For the other two degrees, you will have the opportunity to start an ancient language at introductory level, and no previous experience of ancient language learning is required.

Course Overview

The Classical Civilisation degree is for those who wish to explore the ancient world in its broadest sense. The Ancient History and Classical Archaeology degree, on the other hand, is designed for those whose interest is primarily in history and material culture. The Classics degree allows those to pursue their interest in the languages, literature and thought of Greece and Rome, while considering the broader cultural, social and political contexts of the classical world.

All degrees, however, have a number of common features, and you can move from one degree to another as your interests develop, so long as the basic regulations for each are met.

Degree route: Classical Civilisation

Core modules

For the Classical Civilisation degree, you will take the following core modules:

Greek Culture and Society (15 CATS)

This module introduces students of all backgrounds to the vast panorama of Greek culture, from Homeric times to the coming of Rome. It explores some of the most distinctive features of Greek culture and its social institutions, from the polis, festivals and religion, to mythology, sport and the performance of poetry, while encouraging students to consider the degrees of continuity and difference between ancient Greek culture and their own beliefs and practices.

Roman Culture and Society (15 CATS)

This module explores what was distinctively ‘Roman’ about Roman culture and society, both in Rome itself and throughout its empire, from Britain to Bulgaria, and from the Nile to the Euphrates. The module introduces students of all backgrounds to topics from the late first century BC to the early third century AD, investigating the impact on Roman society of the emergence of sole rulers and dynastic powers, and the gradual opening up of society to provincials.

Optional modules

You will also have a choice of optional modules, including the following:

Encounters with Greek Texts (15 CATS)

This module, taught in translation, introduces students to many different kinds of ancient Greek texts across a wide variety of genres and forms, including epic, drama, lyric, historiography, rhetoric. The module will also allow students to explore critically the range of methodologies and approaches used in the interpretation of ancient texts both within and beyond original cultural and political contexts.

Encounters with Latin Texts (15 CATS)

This module, taught in translation, introduces students to many different kinds of Latin texts written in a variety of genres and forms, including historiographical, epigraphic and rhetorical texts, and literary texts in poetry and prose, from the canonical to the marginal and ‘sub-literary’. As well as expanding awareness of the Latin texts classicists study across different sub-fields (for instance, philology, archaeology, ancient history), the module will explore critically the range of methodologies and approaches used in the interpretation of ancient texts in their cultural and political contexts, and allow students to test out these skills in their own responses to texts.

Ancient Thought: Philosophy, Politics, Science (15 CATS)

This module introduces students to the breadth and variety of ancient thought – investigating the ways in which the ancient Greeks and Romans articulated their thinking and their beliefs, about themselves and the worlds around them. We survey the cultural and intellectual contours of the ancient Graeco-Roman world from the presocratics through to late antiquity, and investigate not just the origins and development of philosophical thinking, but also developments in scientific investigation.

Other options include:

  • Introduction to Greek and/or Roman History
  • Encounters with Material Culture: Objects and Archaeology
  • Greek or Latin language (beginners, intermediate or advanced)
  • An approved external option, e.g. Introduction to Ancient Philosophy (taught by the Philosophy Dept).

While this degree offers flexibility, it is highly recommended that students complete 120 credits of Level 4 modules prior to Honours Level (5 and 6) study in order to prepare well for this.

Degree route: Ancient History and Classical Archaeology

Core modules

For the Ancient History and Classical Archaeology Degree, you will take the following core modules:

Introduction to Greek and/or Roman History (15 CATS + 15 CATS)

You will be introduced to the central themes of Greek and Roman history, from the Greek Archaic Period to the beginning of the Roman Empire. You will gain a broad chronological understanding of the ancient world, and a good knowledge of the range of evidence and methodologies used to analyse historical events and cultural practices. You will also develop advanced skills in analysing evidence, crafting an argument and presenting your ideas coherently and fluently.

Encounters with Material Culture: Objects and Archaeology

This module provides you with the tools you need to approach and interpret the material culture of the ancient world, including buildings, art-works, inscriptions and everyday objects. We look at objects and buildings from their creation to their use and rediscovery, considering issues such as the materials used, production and consumption; style, form and iconography, and contexts of discovery and use. We explore the many questions we can ask of material culture, and the insights it provides into the history and society of the ancient Mediterranean.

Optional Modules

You will choose at least one of these modules:

Greek Culture and Society / Roman Culture and Society

These modules explore the central features of Greek and Roman culture, including aspects such as religion and festivals, political institutions, women and the family, and death. This grounding will allow you to delve further into specific topics in your Honours modules, as well as encouraging you to consider the degrees of continuity and difference between ancient Greek and Roman culture and our own beliefs and practices.

Other options include:

  • Greek or Latin language (beginners, intermediate or advanced)
  • Encounters with Greek and/or Latin Texts
  • Ancient Thought: Philosophy, Politics, Science
  • An approved external option, e.g. Introduction to Ancient Philosophy (taught by the Philosophy Dept).

Degree route: Classics

Core modules

For the Classics Degree, you will take the following core modules:

Latin at appropriate level

· Students entering with Latin A Level will take the module Latin Literary Texts

This allows you to develop your understanding of Latin by further reading of significant works by authors and in genres which, for the most part, you will not have previously studied. As well as developing your ability to read Latin more fluently and to translate from Latin, the module also teaches you advanced grammar, and offers an ambitious introduction to literary criticism and philological analysis at degree level.

· Students without A-level Latin will take the accelerated modules Latin Language I and II

Greek at appropriate Level

· Students with A-level Greek will take Greek Literary Texts

The purpose of this module is to build upon your prior study, to allow you both to broaden and deepen your understanding of Greek by further reading of significant works in major genres of archaic and Classical Greek literature, and to hone skills of critical interpretation. Additionally, the module will consolidate knowledge of grammar and syntax through work in class on classical Greek prose-writing.

· Students without a qualification in Greek will take Greek Language I and II

These accelerated modules will teach you the fundamental elements of Ancient Greek in a clear and accessible way. By the end of the year you will be able you to read and translate passages of original Greek with accuracy and confidence, will have a firm knowledge of Greek vocabulary and syntax, and will be able to begin to appreciate pieces of Classical Greek prose in their original unadapted form.

You will study at least one language at Literary Texts level.

Optional Modules

A choice of four from the modules below:

Greek Culture and Society

This module introduces students of all backgrounds to the vast panorama of Greek culture, from Homeric times to the coming of Rome. It explores some of the most distinctive features of Greek culture and its social institutions, from the polis, festivals and religion, to mythology, sport and theatre, while encouraging students to consider the degrees of continuity and difference between ancient Greek culture and their own beliefs and practices.

Roman Culture and Society

This module explores what was distinctively ‘Roman’ about Roman culture and society, both in Rome itself and throughout its empire, from Britain to Bulgaria, and from the Nile to the Euphrates. The module introduces students of all backgrounds to topics from the late first century BC to the early third century AD, investigating the impact on Roman society of the emergence of sole rulers and dynastic powers, and the gradual opening up of society to provincials. It considers a range of evidence, from poetry to graffiti, monuments to religious artefacts, and is designed to provide a framework within which you can develop your own individual interests in the second and third years.

Ancient Thought: Philosophy, Politics, Science

This module introduces students to the breadth and variety of ancient thought – investigating the ways in which the ancient Greeks and Romans articulated their thinking and their beliefs, about themselves and the worlds around them. We survey the cultural and intellectual contours of the ancient Graeco-Roman world from the presocratics through to late antiquity, and investigate not just the origins and development of philosophical thinking, but also developments in scientific investigation.

Encounters with Greek Texts

This module, taught in translation, introduces students to many different kinds of ancient Greek texts across a wide variety of genres and forms, including epic, drama, lyric, historiography, rhetoric. The module will also allow students to explore critically the range of methodologies and approaches used in the interpretation of ancient texts both within and beyond original cultural and political contexts.

Encounters with Latin Texts

This module, taught in translation, introduces students to many different kinds of Latin texts written in a variety of genres and forms, including historiographical, epigraphic and rhetorical texts, and literary texts in poetry and prose, from the canonical to the marginal and ‘sub-literary’. As well as expanding awareness of the Latin texts classicists study across different sub-fields (for instance, philology, archaeology, ancient history), the module will explore critically the range of methodologies and approaches used in the interpretation of ancient texts in their cultural and political contexts, and allow students to test out these skills in their own responses to texts.

Encounters with Material Culture: Objects and Archaeology

This module provides you with the tools you need to approach and interpret the material culture of the ancient world, including buildings, art-works, inscriptions and everyday objects. We look at objects and buildings from their creation to their use and rediscovery, considering issues such as the materials used, production and consumption; style, form and iconography, and contexts of discovery and use. We explore the many questions we can ask of material culture, and the insights it provides into the history and society of the ancient Mediterranean.

Teaching, assessment and study support

The degree is designed to be fully supportive to those who are new to university study, whatever your age.

There are a variety of assessments and these may include coursework assignments, formal examinations, presentations and research projects. You can study between one and three 30 credit modules per year. You can expect to commit to around 10 hours a week for each module you take, which includes contact time and independent study.

Tutors are experts in their field and have extensive teaching experience, including working with adult learners. Throughout your degree programme you will be provided with considerable support and guidance.

The classes are small and students are fully supported in language learning at all levels. In the Classical Civilisation and Ancient History and Classical Archaeology degree routes, you may choose to study a language (Latin / ancient Greek) at introductory level and/or beyond, this is not obligatory.

University of Warwick was recently awarded Gold in all categories of the government's latest Teaching Excellence Framework (TEF) rankings.

Warwick has achieved a triple Gold rating in the Teaching Excellence Framework 2023

Areas of study at Honours level

Core modules

There are two core modules available to the Classical Civilisation, and Ancient History and Classical Archaeology degree routes at Honours level :

Students on the Classics Degree take at least 30 CATS each of study involving Greek and Latin at levels 5 and 6.

Optional modules

You can have a look at which optional modules were available in the academic year 2022/23 on the Classics department webpages. You will find the modules listed in bold.

    At both Level 4 and Honours Level many modules involve the study of material culture. If you are interested in the archaeological aspects of the ancient world, you should consult with tutors about which modules are the most suitable for this. For more detail on modules available to you within the department, see the Classics Department websiteLink opens in a new window.

    Careers

    We will equip you with the skills and capability to adapt to a workplace which is increasingly affected by accelerated social and technological change.

    Your course and university experience will give you skills that can be transferred to a wide variety of careers. The multi-disciplinary nature of the degree means that you will develop a broad skillset which includes advanced analytical skills, honed written and verbal communication skills, a thirst for critical evaluation and an awareness of divergent perspectives. All these are very desirable to employers. As many graduate jobs are open to students from all degree subjects, there is a wide range of career possibilities. For example, jobs in Law, Civil Service, Marketing, Management and Teaching. You could also work in a range of sectors such as Arts, Culture and Recreation, Business and hospitality Management, Teaching and Lecturing.

    Graduates from Classics courses have gone on to work for employers including:

    • Acturis
    • Cancer Research UK
    • Comic Relief
    • English Heritage
    • EY
    • John Lewis and Partners
    • KPMG
    • Teach First
    • The British Museum
    • Waitrose and Partners

    They have pursued roles such as:

    • Business and related associate professionals
    • Conference and exhibition managers and organisers
    • Finance and investment analysts and advisors
    • Legal associate professionals
    • Management consultants and business analysts
    • Marketing associate professionals
    • Teaching and other educational professionals

    Some students choose to stay with us for further study, on postgraduate courses such as MA CoachingMSc Psychotherapy and Counselling and MA Career Development and Coaching Studies

    Fees and Funding

    The University will charge Home students £1,540 for each 30 credit module in 2024/25 cohort.

    See Student fees and funding for more information and view potential additional fees.

    The University of Warwick is NOT currently sponsoring students on part time or distance learning courses with a Student Visa (formerly known as Tier 4 visa) and so if you require a visa to study a part time/distance learning course in the UK which is longer than 6 months, you may wish to consult the 'right to study' page on our Student Immigration & Compliance website: https://warwick.ac.uk/study/international/immigration/othervisas/whatvisa before you make an application.

    Location and Dates

    Classes are on located on Main Campus, The University of Warwick. Times dependent on modules taken.

    Discover our fantastic Faculty of Arts Building on campus in the video below.

    Student Support

    The CLL Student Support TeamLink opens in a new window supports the pastoral and academic needs of our diverse student body, including:

    • Supporting the academic development of undergraduate and postgraduate students
    • Ensuring a learning experience of the highest quality, both at the University and in partner colleges.
    • Communicating with students in order to ensure a positive learning experience at CLL

    To do this, we support you in many areas, including:

    • Study skills
    • Student welfare
    • Technology and e-learning
    • Careers and development

    4 mature students on Warwick campus

    Life at Warwick

    Within a close-knit community of staff and students from all over the world, discover a campus alive with possibilities. A place where all the elements of your student experience come together in one place. Our supportive, energising, welcoming space creates the ideal environment for forging new connections, having fun and finding inspiration.

    Keep exploring Life at Warwick

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    How to Apply

    Applications for 2024/25 are now open.