Please read our student and staff community guidance on COVID-19
Skip to main content Skip to navigation

Warwick Astronomy Blog

Select tags to filter on

Exploring Warwick Astronomy

This blog collects articles from Warwick Astronomy and Astrophysics group, ranging from advice on home observing, through the history and nature of night sky objects, to accounts of our own research and the life of Warwick Astronomers.

Mon 20 Jul 2020, 11:54

‘Lost’ world’s rediscovery is step towards finding habitable planets

The rediscovery of a lost planet could pave the way for the detection of a world within the habitable ‘Goldilocks zone’ in a distant solar system. The planet, the size and mass of Saturn with an orbit of thirty-five days, is among hundreds of ‘lost’ worlds that University of Warwick astronomers are pioneering a new method to track down and characterise in the hope of finding cooler planets like those in our solar system, and even potentially habitable planets.

A press release from Warwick Newsroom

Tue 21 Jul 2020, 10:42 | Tags: Press Releases, Exoplanets

Thermonuclear blast sends supernova survivor star hurtling across the Milky Way

An exploding white dwarf star blasted itself out of its orbit with another star in a ‘partial supernova’ and is now hurtling across our galaxy, according to a new study from the University of Warwick.

Press release from Warwick Newsroom

Wed 15 Jul 2020, 11:59 | Tags: Press Releases, White Dwarfs

Do Meet Your Heroes: Meeting Neil Armstrong

Professor Don Pollaco has the job most kids want - he finds planets for a living. He has been a research scientist in astrophysics for 33 years and his interest in space was originally inspired by watching the moon landings with his dad.

So when he was asked to talk to a group of visiting VIPs the observatory on La Palma, where the University of Warwick has several research telescopes, he was stunned to find himself face to face with Neil Armstrong.

Reblogged from our series for Warwick Knowledge Centre

Mon 13 Jul 2020, 11:00 | Tags: Astro History, Astro Life, Human Space

The Sticky Situation Regarding Space Debris

Many of the things we take for granted in the modern world rely heavily on satellites in space. James Blake from the Astronomy and Astrophysics Group explores the growing need to safeguard these satellites against the hazards they face on a daily basis.

Reblogged from our series for Warwick Knowledge Centre

Thu 09 Jul 2020, 11:00 | Tags: Human Space

White dwarfs reveal new insights into the origin of carbon in the universe

A new analysis of white dwarf stars involving a University of Warwick astronomer supports their role as a key source of carbon, an element crucial to all life, in the Milky Way and other galaxies.

A press release from Warwick Newsroom

Tue 07 Jul 2020, 12:00 | Tags: Press Releases, White Dwarfs

First exposed planetary core discovered allows glimpse inside other worlds

The surviving core of a gas giant has been discovered orbiting a distant star by University of Warwick astronomers, offering an unprecedented glimpse into the interior of a planet.

A press release from Warwick Newsroom

Wed 01 Jul 2020, 12:00 | Tags: Press Releases, Exoplanets

Six Types of Stars You Should Know About

We are familiar with the idea that the twinkling pinpricks of light in the sky are stars, like our own Sun. That sometimes misleads us into thinking that all those stars are the same. In fact, there are many types of stars, and we can see most of these in the night sky, explains Dr Elizabeth Stanway from Warwick’s astronomy and astrophysics research team.

Reblogged from our series for Warwick Knowledge Centre

Fri 19 Jun 2020, 11:00 | Tags: Night Sky Objects, Astronomy at Home

Astronomy at a Distance: Sundials

The largest and most recognisable star in our sky is, of course, our own Sun. For obvious reasons, there is no point in searching for it at night and you should never look directly at the Sun, so if you want to find out more about it you need a tool that you can use during the day. Professor Tom Marsh from the Astronomy and Astrophysics Group explains how to make a sundial and what it can tell us about our Sun.

Reblogged from our series for Warwick Knowledge Centre

Fri 12 Jun 2020, 11:00 | Tags: Daytime Astronomy, Astronomy at Home, Lockdown Astronomy

Observing the Planets

It’s quite easy to see some of the other planets in our Solar system from your garden, balcony or on an evening walk. In fact, you might have already seen them without realising it, explains Dr David Brown from Warwick’s astrophysics team.

Reblogged from our series for Warwick Knowledge Centre

Fri 05 Jun 2020, 11:00 | Tags: Night Sky Objects, Astronomy at Home

Older news