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Dragons in the Sky

In 793CE, monks writing the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle recorded sightings of dragons in the skies above northern England. While the streaks of fire they witnessed were likely the result of a meteor shower or aurorae, they weren’t the first or the last to see dragons in the night sky. Dr Elizabeth Stanway from Warwick’s Astrophysics research group looks at some of the other legends, myths and stories linking dragons and space.

Originally posted on Warwick's Knowledge Centre

Wed 28 Oct 2020, 10:34 | Tags: Astro History, Night Sky Objects, Astronomy at Home

Six Types of Stars You Should Know About

We are familiar with the idea that the twinkling pinpricks of light in the sky are stars, like our own Sun. That sometimes misleads us into thinking that all those stars are the same. In fact, there are many types of stars, and we can see most of these in the night sky, explains Dr Elizabeth Stanway from Warwick’s astronomy and astrophysics research team.

Reblogged from our series for Warwick Knowledge Centre

Fri 19 Jun 2020, 11:00 | Tags: Night Sky Objects, Astronomy at Home

Astronomy at a Distance: Sundials

The largest and most recognisable star in our sky is, of course, our own Sun. For obvious reasons, there is no point in searching for it at night and you should never look directly at the Sun, so if you want to find out more about it you need a tool that you can use during the day. Professor Tom Marsh from the Astronomy and Astrophysics Group explains how to make a sundial and what it can tell us about our Sun.

Reblogged from our series for Warwick Knowledge Centre

Fri 12 Jun 2020, 11:00 | Tags: Daytime Astronomy, Astronomy at Home, Lockdown Astronomy

Observing the Planets

It’s quite easy to see some of the other planets in our Solar system from your garden, balcony or on an evening walk. In fact, you might have already seen them without realising it, explains Dr David Brown from Warwick’s astrophysics team.

Reblogged from our series for Warwick Knowledge Centre

Fri 05 Jun 2020, 11:00 | Tags: Night Sky Objects, Astronomy at Home

Nebulae

Nebulae are birthplaces of stars and spectacular sights to behold. But you don’t need a powerful telescope to experience these ‘Stellar Nurseries’, as postgraduate researcher Jack McCleery explains.

Reblogged from our series for Warwick Knowledge Centre

Thu 21 May 2020, 11:00 | Tags: Night Sky Objects, Astronomy at Home

Seeing Satellites

It’s not just stars, planets and meteors that fill our night sky. Our planet is also orbited by spacecraft that you can spot – if you know where and when, explains Professor Don Pollacco, the science coordinator for the upcoming space telescope PLATO.

Reblogged from our series for Warwick Knowledge Centre

Fri 15 May 2020, 11:00 | Tags: Astronomy at Home, Lockdown Astronomy, Human Space

The Night Sky in April and May

The skies above us are changing constantly as the Earth beneath our feet makes its way around the Sun, and the planets and stars above us make their own journeys. It means that many objects are out of our view for much of the time – but when they are visible, it is amazing how much you can see. As Ashley Chrimes from Warwick’s Department of Physics explains, it is even possible to snap a good photo of the Moon.

Reblogged from our series for Warwick Knowledge Centre

Tue 28 Apr 2020, 23:15 | Tags: Astronomy at Home, Lockdown Astronomy

Meteors

Shooting stars – or meteors - are some of the most magical features of the night sky. Seeing a shooting star is a special experience. Seeing many in quick succession – a meteor shower – and you are treated to a spectacular natural firework display. Meteor showers are seasonal and occur at certain times of year. Professor Tom Marsh from the University of Warwick’s astrophysics team explains exactly what shooting stars are and the best way to see them.

Reblogged from our series for Warwick Knowledge Centre

Tue 21 Apr 2020, 10:00 | Tags: Night Sky Objects, Astronomy at Home, Lockdown Astronomy

Constellations

This week we look at some of the most recognisable features in the night sky - the constellations. Constellation is a word that comes from ancient Latin, meaning ‘the coming together of stars’. They’re the regular patterns that we can see in the sky, formed by some of the brightest stars. They are constant but change their position with the seasons. You can use them to navigate and many ancient cultures have looked up at them. Patrick Cronin-Coltsmann, a PhD student from Warwick’s astrophysics team, takes us through some of the easiest to spot.

Reblogged from our series for Warwick Knowledge Centre

Wed 15 Apr 2020, 11:00 | Tags: Night Sky Objects, Astronomy at Home, Lockdown Astronomy

Astronomy at Home

Social distancing may be keeping you at home, but that doesn’t mean you can’t be exploring the universe at the same time. Did you know that you can enter a whole world of stargazing using objects you might have around the home? There is plenty that you can discover using only the naked eye. Scientists from the University of Warwick’s Astronomy and Astrophysics Group will be showing us what you can discover in our skies over the coming weeks, with advice on how you can get involved in Astronomy without ever leaving your garden.

Reblogged from our series for Warwick Knowledge Centre.

Fri 03 Apr 2020, 11:10 | Tags: Astronomy at Home, Lockdown Astronomy