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Classics

The Department of Classics and Ancient History offers two degrees that can be studied part-time, that are designed to reflect your interests:

  • Classical Civilisation
  • Ancient History and Classical Archaeology
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The Classical Civilisation degree is aimed at those who wish to explore the ancient world in its broadest sense. The Ancient History and Classical Archaeology degree, on the other hand, is designed for those whose interest is primarily in history and material culture. Both degrees, however, have a number of common features and you are able to move from one degree to another as your interests develop, so long as the basic regulations for each are met.

While this degree offers flexibility, it is highly recommended that students complete 120 credits of Level 4 modules prior to Honours Level (5 and 6) study in order to prepare well for this.

For the Ancient History and Classical Archaeology Degree, you will take the following core modules:

Greek Culture and Society

This module introduces students of all backgrounds to the vast panorama of Greek culture, from Homeric times to the coming of Rome. It explores some of the most distinctive features of Greek culture and its social institutions, from the polis, festivals and religion, to mythology, sport and the performance of poetry, while encouraging students to consider the degrees of continuity and difference between ancient Greek culture and their own beliefs and practices. The module is designed to provide a framework within which you can develop your own individual interests in the second and third years.

Roman Culture and Society

This module explores what was distinctively ‘Roman’ about Roman culture and society, both in Rome itself and throughout its empire, from Britain to Bulgaria, and from the Nile to the Euphrates. The module introduces students of all backgrounds to topics from the late first century BC to the early third century AD, investigating the impact on Roman society of the emergence of sole rulers and dynastic powers, and the gradual opening up of society to provincials. It considers a range of evidence, from poetry to graffiti, monuments to religious artefacts, and is designed to provide a framework within which you can develop your own individual interests in the second and third years.

You will choose between taking Latin Language or Greek Language

Latin Language

This introductory module will teach you the fundamental grammatical structures of Latin through explicit, systematic exposure and explanation, graded exercises and translation. By the end of your course, you can expect to have a good knowledge of Latin vocabulary and syntax, and the ability to read and translate from Latin, with an understanding of an inflected language. You will be encouraged to develop your appreciation of the influence of Latin on English, and to cultivate your capacity for logical analysis.

Greek Language

This introductory module will teach you the fundamental elements of Ancient Greek in a logical and systematic way. It will enable you to read and translate passages of adapted Greek with accuracy and confidence. By the end of your course, you can expect to have a good knowledge of Greek vocabulary and syntax, and to be able to read and translate from Greek, with good understanding of an inflected language. You will be encouraged to develop your appreciation of the influence of Greek on English, and to cultivate your capacity for logical analysis.

You will also take the Introduction to Greek and Roman History module

You will be introduced to the central themes of Greek and Roman history, from the Greek Archaic Period to the beginning of the Roman Empire. You will gain a broad chronological understanding of the ancient world, and good knowledge of the range of evidence and methodologies used to analyse its historical events and cultural practices. You will also develop advanced skills in analysing evidence, crafting an argument and presenting your ideas coherently and fluently.

Key facts

Starts: September 2020

Level: Undergraduate

Length: Four - Ten Years
(Part-time)

Venue: University of Warwick

Student timetables

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Success stories

"I felt very brave. I have found it challenging but I would encourage anyone to do it. Warwick University has great facilities and support for students of all ages and disciplines which I look forward to sharing with all those I meet."

Emma, current Part-time student