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Support for LGBTQUIA+ People

This resource brings together sources of support for LGBTQUIA+ students and staff at Warwick.

If you are supporting an LGBTQUIA+ person, you may also be interested in key sources of advice and support for supporters.

Please suggest or request additional resources by emailing queeringuniversity@warwick.ac.uk.

Key support services & groups for LGBTQUIA+ people

Peer and professional support is available for LGBTQUIA+ students and staff at the University. You can find out more about the key sources of support below. If you can't find what you're looking for, please contact Warwick Wellbeing Services (for students) or Human Resources (for staff) who can signpost you to appropriate support.

Peer support at the University

Trans Community Support Group

Offers trans people, and those questioning their gender identity, a space to discuss trans & gender identity issues in a relaxed environment with other trans and/or questioning people.

Warwick Pride

The society/association represents and supports Warwick's LGBTQUIA+ student community. They organise campaigns, social events, education and awareness activities and welfare schemes such as the 'parenting scheme' and 'befriending service'.

Rainbow Staff Network

The network for LGBTQUIA+ staff at Warwick, offering a space for LGBTQUIA+ staff to meet, share experiences, discuss related issues, access information and support, and organise events.

Professional support at the University

Report + Support

The Report & Support team offers advice and support to staff and students in relation to experiences of hate crime, harassment, bullying, discrimination, sexual misconduct and other forms of violence and abuse. That includes staff and students who have experienced these behaviours, as well as the people supporting them.

Wellbeing Support Services

The University’s wellbeing services can support you with practical and emotional issues impacting your wellbeing or mental health and aspects of University life, including referrals for counselling and psychology support.

Social Inclusion

The Social Inclusion team identify critical inclusion issues, and work with partners to develop solutions and put them into practice.

Personal or senior tutor

The personal tutoring team offer support and guidance to students. Every undergraduate and taught postgraduate student is assigned a personal tutor. You can find out more about the role of your personal and senior tutors here.

Sexual and Domestic Abuse Adviser

Rachel Craven, our SDAA, offers emotional support and advice to students affected by sexual and/or domestic violence.

SU Advice Centre

The Students' Union Advice Centre is a free, professional, confidential, non-judgmental service, independent from the University.

Every student is a member of the Students' Union and eligible for support from the Advice Centre.

Human Resources

HR can offer information, advice and signposting on issues affecting staff et the University. Every department has a linked HR Adviser.

External support

NHS

If you are trans or questioning your gender identity, you can ask your GP to refer you to a Gender Identity Clinic (GIC).

The NHS also operate an urgent mental health helpline, and psychological therapies service (IAPT) if you need mental health support.

Mindline Trans+

An emotional support helpline and information signposting for trans people.

Can also support family members, friends, colleagues and carers.

Available Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays 8pm-midnight

Switchboard LGBT+ helpline

An information, support and referral service via telephone or chat for anyone considering issues around their sexuality and/or gender identity.

Phone lines open 10am-10pm every day.

Galop

LGBT+ domestic abuse, conversion therapy, and hate crime helplines and resources.

Helplines available weekdays, 10am-4/5pm.

MindOut

An LGBTQ-specific mental health service, offering advice and information via telephone, email or online chat.

Issue-specific support and resources

Exploring your sexual or romantic orientation or gender identity

If you're exploring or questioning your sexual or romantic orientation or gender identity you might find it helpful to connect with LGBTQUIA+ peers via Warwick Pride's 'parenting scheme' or 'befriending service' (for students), or the Rainbow Staff Network's buddy scheme (for staff).

If you'd like professional support to explore your feelings and any concerns you have relating to sexual or romantic orientation or gender identity, Wellbeing Support Services (for students) or the Employee Assistance Programme (EAP) (for staff) can support you. Alternatively, Pink Therapy offers a directory of qualified private therapists working with the LGBT+ community.

External resources that can support you explore your sexual or romantic orientation or gender identity include:

Coming out

If you'd like to come out to others at Warwick, you might find it helpful to use Queering University's "I'm part of the trans community" or "I'm part of the LGBTQUIA+ community" tools to facilitate coming out to staff or students at Warwick.

If you want to explore your feelings and any concerns about coming out, Wellbeing Support Services (for students) or the Employee Assistance Programme (EAP) (for staff) can support you. Alternatively, Pink Therapy offers a directory of qualified private therapists working with the LGBT+ community.

You can also access peer support through the Trans Community Support Group, Warwick Pride (for students) or the Rainbow Staff Network (for staff).

There are lots of external resources on coming out, including:

Transitioning

The guide to being trans at Warwick covers key logistical information you might need if you're transitioning at the University, including how to update your chosen name, legal name, gender marker, pronouns and title on University systems. If you would like individual support navigating aspects of your transition and its impact whilst at University, please contact your senior tutor or Wellbeing Support Services (for students) or your line or senior manager or departmental HR adviser (for staff).

You can access peer support through the Trans Community Support Group, which offers a relaxed environment to discuss trans & gender identity issues with other trans and/or questioning people, and via Warwick Pride (for students) or the Rainbow Staff Network.

Wellbeing Support Services can offer practical and emotional support for students, including referrals for counselling and psychological support (though not GIC referrals). If you would like to be referred to a Gender Identity Clinic (GIC), you can make an appointment to request a referral from your GP. If your studies have been affected, your personal or senior tutor can help explain your options with regards to academic support and mitigating circumstances. If your work has been affected or you need support at work, your line or senior manager or departmental HR adviser can support you.

Brook offers guidance on aspects of social, medical, and legal transition in the UK.

Mental health and wellbeing

If you are in crisis or feel that you are not able to keep yourself safe, please contact a crisis service or helpline such as:

Just over half of LGBT people have experienced depression in the last year, whilst three in five have experienced anxiety. (Stonewall, 2018) Sometimes we need support with our mental health, just like we do with our physical health. There's no shame in getting support with your mental health and wellbeing.

Professional mental health and wellbeing support is available from Wellbeing Support Services (for students) or from the Employee Assistance Programme (EAP) (for staff). In addition to 1-1 support and group therapy, Wellbeing Support Services offer masterclasses and a library of self-help resources relating to mental health and wellbeing. Pink Therapy offers a directory of qualified private therapists working with the LGBT+ community.

If your studies have been affected, your personal or senior tutor can help explain your options with regards to academic support and mitigating circumstances. If your work has been affected or you need support at work, your line or senior manager or departmental HR adviser can support you.

The NHS provides an urgent mental health helpline, psychological therapies service (IAPT), and mental health and wellbeing information and resources, which are available via the NHS mental health hub online.

MindOut is an LGBTQ-specific mental health service, offering advice and information via telephone, email or online chat. Mindline Trans+ is an emotional support helpline and information signposting for trans people.

If you have been bereaved by suicide, Survivors of Bereavement by Suicide provide support groups, email support, a helpline, and forum.

There are lots of LGBTQUIA+ specific mental health and wellbeing resources online, including:

Eating disorders

The LGBTQUIA+ inclusive eating disorders charity, Beat, provide information and support in relation to eating disorders, and a telephone and web chat helpline (9am-midnight weekdays, 4pm-midnight weekends). Beat also have a webpage dedicated to eating disorders in the LGBTQ+ community, which includes personal stories from LGBTQ+ people.

Wellbeing Support Services can offer practical and emotional support, including referrals for counselling and psychological support. The Employee Assistance Programme (EAP) can offer similar support for staff. If your studies have been affected, your personal or senior tutor can help explain your options with regards to academic support and mitigating circumstances. If your work has been affected or you need support at work, your line or senior manager or departmental HR adviser can support you.

LGBTQUIAphobia and behaviour that's not inclusive

Warwick's principles explicitly state that we do not tolerate homophobia, biphobia or discrimination based on sexual orientation, nor do we tolerate transphobia or discrimination based on gender identity. You can get support to address LGBTQUIAphobic and exclusionary behaviour, and with the impact of the behaviour on yourself/others, by contacting your personal or senior tutor or Wellbeing Support Services (for students), line or senior manager or departmental HR adviser (for staff) or Report & Support (for staff and students).

If your studies have been affected, your personal or senior tutor can help explain your options with regards to academic support and mitigating circumstances. If your work has been affected or you need support at work, your line or senior manager or departmental HR adviser can support you.

You may also find it helpful to access peer support from Warwick Pride (for students), the Trans Community Support Group (for staff and students), or the Rainbow Staff Network (for staff).

The Queering University programme offers guidance & resources and training for staff and students on a wide range of issues, to:

  • build awareness of LGBTQUIA+ identities and experiences,
  • help people recognise what LGBTQUIAphobia and LGBTQUIA+ inclusive behaviour and attitudes look like, and to
  • equip people with the knowledge, skills, and confidence to challenge LGBTQUIAphobia and develop LGBTQUIA+ inclusive practices.

You can signpost people to Queering University resources and training, or contact us to develop something bespoke for your situation.

You might also want to contact LGBTQUIA+ representatives and advisory groups, such as the LGBTQUIA+ Students' Association (Warwick Pride) or the LGBTQUIA+ Taskforce (Rainbow Taskforce). They can help address any institutional issues which may be contributing, and seek institutional responses to address the issue.

Hate, harassment, bullying and discrimination

Report & Support can help you access support if you have been affected by bullying and harassment, discrimination, or a hate incident or hate crime. You can speak to a Report and Support adviser confidentially about support options as well as discuss the option of reporting. You will never be forced to submit a report to the police, or to lodge a formal complaint to the University, as this is your choice.

Wellbeing Support Services can offer practical and emotional support (for students), including referrals for counselling and psychological support. The Employee Assistance Programme (EAP) can offer similar support for staff. If your studies have been affected, your personal or senior tutor can help explain your options with regards to academic support and mitigating circumstances. If your work has been affected or you need support at work, your line or senior manager or departmental HR adviser can support you.

Galop offer an LGBT+ specific hate crime helpline, as well as LGBT+ specific hate crime resources including:

Other useful external resources include:

Domestic abuse and sexual violence

Warwick's Sexual and Domestic Abuse Adviser can support anyone who has been affected by domestic or sexual violence, and offers emotional support and advocacy to anyone who is in crisis and their supporters.

You can speak to a Report and Support adviser confidentially about support options as well as discuss the option of reporting. You will never be forced to submit a report to the police, or lodge a formal complaint to the University, as this is your choice. Further on- and off-campus support is listed here.

Coventry Rape and Sexual Abuse Centre (CRASAC) have compiled information for LGBTQI+ survivors and how the centre works with LGBTQI+ people, and The Survivors' Trust have published guides for LGBT+ survivors.

Galop offer a helpline, forum and support services for LGBT+ people who are victims of domestic abuse and sexual violence, whilst Loving Me specifically offer support and advocacy for trans domestic abuse victims.

Forced marriage

You have the right to choose who you marry, when you get married, or if you get married at all. Marriage must be entered into with the full and free consent of both people. Forced marriage is when someone is coerced or forced to marry someone. This includes emotional or psychological pressure, such as if you're made to feel like you're bringing shame on your family. Forced marriage can be attempted by families or communities as a form of conversion therapy or honour-based abuse, as a means of attempting to change (or control the perception of) someone's sexuality and/or gender identity. Forced marriage is a form of domestic abuse.

Galop can support you if you are concerned about, or experiencing, forced marriage. You can also get help from the Government's Forced Marriage Unit. More information about the support the FMU can provide is detailed in their guide for LGBT+ people. If you have been taken abroad, you can contact your nearest British embassy.

Warwick's Sexual and Domestic Abuse Adviser can support anyone who has been affected by domestic or sexual violence, including experiences related to forced marriage, and offers emotional support and advocacy to anyone who is in crisis and their supporters.

Wellbeing Support Services can offer practical and emotional support (for students), including referrals for counselling and psychological support. The Employee Assistance Programme (EAP) can offer similar support for staff. If your studies have been affected, your personal or senior tutor can help explain your options with regards to academic support and mitigating circumstances. If your work has been affected or you need support at work, your line or senior manager or departmental HR adviser can support you.

Estrangement

LGBT+ students are almost twice as likely to have a distant relationship with family, and twice as likely to find family contact negative. (Stand Alone and Sheffield Hallam University, 2018) Being estranged doesn't mean you have to go it alone however; support is available.

Stand Alone's advice centre provides information about support, financing your studies and accommodation options as an estranged student. UCAS' information hub for estranged students also covers key logistical considerations and support available.

If you need support navigating the emotional, mental health and wellbeing, or logistical (including financial) aspects of estrangement Wellbeing Support Services can support you, including with a referral for counselling and psychological support if helpful. If your studies have been affected, your personal or senior tutor can help explain your options with regards to academic support and mitigating circumstances. If your work has been affected or you need support at work, your line or senior manager or departmental HR adviser can support you.

The Queering University programme's Solo project has compiled details of the support available for estranged students, including student funding and financial support, accommodation, community, wellbeing & mental health, applying and progressing to postgraduate study, and graduation and career support.

Homelessness, unsafe or precarious housing

If you are LGBTQUIA+ and homeless or facing homelessness, or are living in an unsafe housing situation, Stonewall Housing and akt (ages 16-25) can provide support to stay safe, access information, support and advocacy, to find emergency accommodation and pursue long-term safe housing solutions.

Wellbeing Support Services can arrange emergency accommodation at the University, and support you with the emotional, mental health and wellbeing and logistical aspects of homelessness and unsafe housing. The Employee Assistance Programme (EAP) can offer similar support for staff. If your studies have been affected, your personal or senior tutor can help explain your options with regards to academic support and mitigating circumstances. If your work has been affected or you need support at work, your line or senior manager or departmental HR adviser can support you.

Seeking asylum

Some LGBTQUIA+ people may seek asylum in the UK, including on the grounds that their sexual orientation and/or trans identity places them in danger if they return to their home country. The University's immigration and compliance team have compiled sources of external information and advice relating to immigration and asylum.

Stonewall's resources for LGBT+ asylum seekers include an overview of asylum and the asylum process, and support for LGBT+ asylum seekers. Rainbow Migration provide practical and emotional support for LGBTQI+ people seeking asylum, and specialist legal information and advice, including legal advice and information for LGBTQI+ people who want to live in the UK with their partners.

Wellbeing Support Services can offer practical and emotional support, including referrals for counselling and psychological support. The Employee Assistance Programme (EAP) can offer similar support for staff. If your studies have been affected, your personal or senior tutor can help explain your options with regards to academic support and mitigating circumstances. If your work has been affected or you need support at work, your line or senior manager or departmental HR adviser can support you.

Drugs & Alcohol

You can find honest information about drugs via organisations such as FRANK and drugs and me, whilst drinkaware offer information about alcohol.

If you are concerned about your use of, or relationship with, drugs or alcohol you can get support from organisations such as the Coventry Drug and Alcohol Service (or a local service elsewhere) and Antidote, an LGBT+ drug and alcohol support service. There are also local Alcoholics Anonymous meetings.

Wellbeing Support Services can offer practical and emotional support, including referrals for counselling and psychological support. The Employee Assistance Programme (EAP) can offer similar support for staff. If your studies have been affected, your personal or senior tutor can help explain your options with regards to academic support and mitigating circumstances. If your work has been affected or you need support at work, your line or senior manager or departmental HR adviser can support you.

Sexual health and HIV

Brook offer LGBTQUIA+ inclusive resources relating to sex and sexual health, as well as a search function for local sexual health-related and support services (including testing services).

You can often request free postal testing kits for STIs/HIV, such as via freetest.me. Terrence Higgins Trust (THT) have a free online HIV test finder.

Terrence Higgins Trust (THT) is an LGBTQUIA+ inclusive national sexual health charity that provides information and support on sexual health and STIs/HIV:

THT offer support via a telephone helpline, live chat service, and email or post if you have concerns or need information relating to sexual health, or have received a positive STI or HIV diagnosis. THT also offer reduced rate counselling on a range of issues including dealing with an HIV diagnosis, emotions and low self-esteem, issues around identity, sex and relationships, chemsex, drugs and alcohol. If you have received a positive HIV diagnosis, you can also talk to Positively UK and get support with all aspects of your diagnosis, care, and living with HIV.

Wellbeing Support Services can offer practical and emotional support, including referrals for counselling and psychological support. The Employee Assistance Programme (EAP) can offer similar support for staff. If your studies have been affected, your personal or senior tutor can help explain your options with regards to academic support and mitigating circumstances. If your work has been affected or you need support at work, your line or senior manager or departmental HR adviser can support you.

The Queering University programme's Living Positively project has summarised the support available for HIV+ students studying at the University and the support available for HIV+ staff working at the University. This includes information related to time off for medical appointments, reasonable adjustments, mitigating circumstances, and reporting harassment or discrimination.

Conversion therapy

Galop operate an LGBT+ conversion therapy helpline and support services for people who have experienced so-called conversion therapies.

Wellbeing Support Services can offer practical and emotional support, including referrals for counselling and psychological support. The Employee Assistance Programme (EAP) can offer similar support for staff. If your studies have been affected, your personal or senior tutor can help explain your options with regards to academic support and mitigating circumstances. If your work has been affected or you need support at work, your line or senior manager or departmental HR adviser can support you.

Blackmail

Report & Support can help you access support if you have been affected by blackmail. You can speak to a Report and Support adviser confidentially about support options as well as discuss the option of reporting. You will never be forced to submit a report to the police, or lodge a formal complaint to the University, as this is your choice.

Wellbeing Support Services can offer practical and emotional support, including referrals for counselling and psychological support. The Employee Assistance Programme (EAP) can offer similar support for staff. If your studies have been affected, your personal or senior tutor can help explain your options with regards to academic support and mitigating circumstances. If your work has been affected or you need support at work, your line or senior manager or departmental HR adviser can support you.

Galop offer support for LGBTQUIA+ people who are being, or have been, blackmailed. Galop's video on LGBT+ blackmail shares one person's experience of blackmail as an LGBT+ person, and their experience of getting support from Galop.

Faith

LGBTQUIA+ people of faith often face specific difficulties, both within and external to the LGBTQUIA+ community. The Chaplaincy is available to support LGBTQUIA+ people and their supporters in relation to faith and religion.

There are also some specific external support services available for people of faith within the LGBTQUIA+ community:

  • Keshet, supporting Jewish LGBT+ people
  • Imaan, supporting Muslim LGBT+ people
  • Quest, supporting Catholic LGBT+ people
  • Sarbat, supporting Sikh LGBT+ people

The Proud Trust also have a resource on coming out as a person of faith, as well as a faith and religion resources hub with stories from LGBT+ people of faith, guidance on responding to faith-based LGBTphobia and exploring your LGBT+ identity alongside your faith, and more.

This resource was created as part of the Queering University programme.