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Trade Board A-Z

A

Aerated Waters Trade Boards

Three separate Trade Boards were created in 1920: Aerated Waters Trade Board for England and Wales (established on 2 January 1920); Aerated Waters Trade Board for Scotland (established on 8 January 1920); and Aerated Waters Trade Board for Ireland (established on 4 February 1920 and transferred to the control of the Irish government in 1922). A separate Trade Board for Northern Ireland was created in 1926.

The Aerated Waters Trade Board (England and Wales) and Aerated Waters Trade Board (Scotland) were converted into Wages Councils under the Wages Councils Act of 1945 and merged in 1983.

Relevant documents at the Modern Records Centre include:

B

Baking Trade Board

Two separate Trade Boards were created in 1938: Baking Trade Board (England and Wales) and Baking Trade Board (Scotland). They were converted into Wages Councils under the Wages Councils Act of 1945, and were abolished in 1971 (England and Wales) and 1963 (Scotland).

The Modern Records Centre does not hold subject files relating to this particular Trade Board.

Boot and Floor Polish Trade Board

The Boot and Floor Polish Trade Board (Great Britain) was established on 11 July 1921 and converted into a Wages Council under the Wages Councils Act of 1945. The Boot and Floor Polish Wages Council (Great Britain) was abolished in 1974.

The Modern Records Centre does not hold subject files relating to this particular Trade Board.

Boot and Shoe Repairing Trade Boards

Two separate Trade Boards for Britain and Ireland were created in 1919: Boot and Shoe Repairing Trade Board for Great Britain (established on 5 July 1919) and Boot and Shoe Repairing Trade Board for Ireland (established on 15 October 1919 and transferred to the control of the Irish government in 1922). A Trade Board for Northern Ireland was created in 1922.

The Boot and Shoe Repairing Trade Board (Great Britain) was converted into a Wages Council under the Wages Councils Act of 1945, and was still in existence in 1988.

Relevant documents at the Modern Records Centre include:

Brush and Broom Trade Boards

Two separate Trade Boards were created in 1919: Brush and Broom Trade Board for Great Britain (established on 17 July 1919) and Brush and Broom Trade Board for Ireland (established on 22 December 1919 and transferred to the control of the Irish government in 1922). A Trade Board for Northern Ireland was created in 1922.

The Brush and Broom Trade Board (Great Britain) was converted into a Wages Council under the Wages Councils Act of 1945 and abolished in 1974.

Relevant documents at the Modern Records Centre include:

Button Making Trade Board

The Button Making Trade Board (Great Britain) was established on 13 February 1920 and converted into a Wages Council under the Wages Councils Act of 1945. The Button Manufacturing Wages Council was still in existence in 1988.

Relevant documents at the Modern Records Centre include:

A selection of documents relating to the Button Making Trade Board have been digitised and are available online.

C

Chain Trade Board

The Chain Trade Board (Great Britain) was one of the founding four trade boards, and was established on 3 January 1910. The majority of workers affected by the Board lived in the area around Cradley Heath, Staffordshire.

The Chain Trade Board was converted into a Wages Council under the Wages Councils Act of 1945 and was abolished in 1956.

Relevant documents at the Modern Records Centre include:

A selection of documents relating to the Chain Trade Board have been digitised and are available online

Coffin Furniture and Cerement Making Trade Board

The Coffin Furniture and Cerement Making Trade Board (Great Britain) was established on 16 December 1919 and converted into a Wages Council under the Wages Councils Act of 1945. The Coffin Furniture and Cerement Making Wages Council was still in existence in 1988.

Relevant documents at the Modern Records Centre include:

Corset Trade Board

The Corset Trade Board (Great Britain and Ireland) was established on 17 July 1919. The Irish Trade Board was transferred to the control of the Irish government in 1922 and the Corset Trade Board (Great Britain) was converted into a Wages Council under the Wages Councils Act of 1945. The Corset Wages Council was abolished in 1981 and replaced by the Clothing Manufacturing Wages Council (Great Britain).

Relevant documents at the Modern Records Centre include:

Cotton Waste Reclamation Trade Board

The Cotton Waste Reclamation Trade Board (Great Britain) was established on 16 September 1920 and was converted into a Wages Council under the Wages Councils Act of 1945. The Cotton Waste Reclamation Wages Council was still in existence in 1988.

Relevant documents at the Modern Records Centre include:

Cutlery Trade Board

The Cutlery Trade Board was formed in 1933, converted into a Wages Council under the Wages Councils Act of 1945, and abolished in 1969.

Relevant documents at the Modern Records Centre include:

D

Dressmaking and Women's Light Clothing Trade Boards

Three separate Trade Boards were created in 1920: Dressmaking and Women's Light Clothing Trade Board for England and Wales (established on 15 January 1920); Dressmaking and Women's Light Clothing Trade Board for Scotland (established on 29 March 1920); and Dressmaking and Women's Light Clothing Trade Board for Ireland (established on 31 March 1920 and transferred to the control of the Irish government in 1922). A separate Trade Board for Northern Ireland was created in 1922.

The Dressmaking and Women's Light Clothing Trade Board (England and Wales) and Dressmaking and Women's Light Clothing Trade Board (Scotland) were converted into Wages Councils under the Wages Councils Act of 1945. They were abolished in 1981 and replaced by the Clothing Manufacturing Wages Council (Great Britain).

Relevant documents at the Modern Records Centre include:

Drift Nets Mending Trade Board

The Drift Nets Mending Trade Board (Great Britain) was established in 1919. The Trade Board was converted into a Wages Council under the Wages Councils Act of 1945 and abolished in 1960.

Relevant documents at the Modern Records Centre include:

F

Flax and Hemp Trade Boards

Two separate Trade Boards were created in 1920: Flax and Hemp Trade Board for Great Britain (established on 27 January 1920) and Flax and Hemp Trade Board for Ireland (established on 20 May 1920 and transferred to the control of the Irish government in 1922). A separate Trade Board for Northern Ireland was created in 1922.

The Flax and Hemp Trade Board (Great Britain) was converted into a Wages Council under the Wages Councils Act of 1945 and was still in existence in 1988.

Relevant documents at the Modern Records Centre include:

Fur Trade Board

The Fur Trade Board (Great Britain) was established on 25 October 1919 and converted into a Wages Council under the Wages Councils Act of 1945. It was still in existence in 1988.

Relevant documents at the Modern Records Centre include:

Fustian Cutting Trade Board

The Fustian Cutting Trade Board (Great Britain) was formed in 1933, converted into a Wages Council under the Wages Councils Act of 1945, and abolished in 1960.

Relevant documents at the Modern Records Centre include:

  • File, 1933-1960, in the archives of the Transport and General Workers Union

G

General Waste Materials Reclamation Trade Boards

Two separate Trade Boards were created in 1920: General Waste Materials Reclamation Trade Board for Great Britain, and General Waste Materials Reclamation Trade Board for Ireland (both established on 27 August 1920). The Irish Board was transferred to the control of the Irish government and a separate Trade Board for Northern Ireland was created in 1922.

The General Waste Materials Reclamation Trade Board (Great Britain) was converted into a Wages Council under the Wages Councils Act of 1945. The General Waste Materials Reclamation Wages Council (Great Britain) was still in existence in 1988.

The Modern Records Centre only has a small quantity of material relating to this trade board. Relevant documents include:

Grocery and Provisions Trade Boards

Two separate Trade Boards were created: Grocery and Provisions Trade Board for England and Wales (established on 23 June 1920); and Grocery and Provisions Trade Board for Scotland (established on 1 November 1920).

Relevant documents at the Modern Records Centre include:

H

Hair, Bass and Fibre Trade Board

The Hair, Bass and Fibre Trade Board (Great Britain) was established on 20 February 1920. It was converted into a Wages Council under the Wages Councils Act of 1945 and abolished in 1974.

Relevant documents at the Modern Records Centre include:

Hat, Cap and Millinery Trade Boards

Three separate Trade Boards were created in 1920: Hat, Cap and Millinery Trade Board for England and Wales (established on 12 January 1920); Hat, Cap and Millinery Trade Board for Scotland (established on 31 March 1920); and Hat, Cap and Millinery Trade Board for Ireland (established on 31 March 1920). The Irish Board was transferred to the control of the Irish government in 1922 and a separate Trade Board for Northern Ireland was created in 1922.

The Trade Boards were converted into Wages Councils under the Wages Councils Act of 1945, and the English, Welsh and Scottish Wages Councils merged in 1963 to form the Hat, Cap and Millinery Wages Council (Great Britain). The Hat, Cap and Millinery Wages Councils were still in existence in 1988.

Relevant documents at the Modern Records Centre include:

Hollow-ware Trade Board

The Hollow-ware Trade Board (Great Britain) was established on 4 August 1914, converted into a Wages Council under the Wages Councils Act of 1945, and abolished in 1975.

Relevant documents at the Modern Records Centre include:

J

Jute Trade Board

The Jute Trade Board (Great Britain) was established on 8 December 1919 and abolished in 1969.

Relevant documents at the Modern Records Centre include:

K

Keg and Drum Trade Board

The Keg and Drum Trade Board (Great Britain) was formed in 1928, converted into a Wages Council under the Wages Councils Act of 1945, and abolished in 1975

The Modern Records Centre only has a small quantity of material relating to this trade board. Relevant documents include:

L

Lace Finishing Trade Board

The Lace Finishing Trade Board (Great Britain and Ireland) was one of the founding four trade boards, and was established on 7 September 1910. It was converted into a Wages Council under the Wages Councils Act of 1945 and was still in existence in 1988.

Relevant documents at the Modern Records Centre include:

A selection of documents relating to the Lace Finishing Trade Board have been digitised and are available online

Laundry Trade Boards

Two separate Trade Boards were created in 1919-20: Laundry Trade Board for Great Britain (established on 1 May 1919) and Laundry Trade Board for Ireland (established on 14 April 1920). In 1922 the Irish Board was transferred to the control of the Irish government and a separate Trade Board for Northern Ireland was created.

The Laundry Trade Boards were converted into Wages Councils under the Wages Councils Act of 1945. The Laundry Wages Council was still in existence in 1988.

Relevant documents at the Modern Records Centre include:

A selection of documents relating to the Laundry Trade Boards have been digitised and are available online

Linen and Cotton Embroidery Trade Board

The Linen and Cotton Embroidery Trade Board for Ireland was established on 8 May 1916 . After Irish independence in 1922 a separate Trade Board for Northern Ireland was created.

Relevant documents at the Modern Records Centre include:

Linen and Cotton Handkerchief and Household Goods and Linen Piece Goods Trade Boards

Two separate Trade Boards were created: Linen and Cotton Handkerchief and Household Goods and Linen Piece Goods Trade Board for Great Britain (established on 28 May 1920) and Linen and Cotton Handkerchief and Household Goods and Linen Piece Goods Trade Board for Ireland (established on 4 June 1920). In 1922 the Irish Board was transferred to the control of the Irish government and a separate Trade Board was created for Northern Ireland.

The Trade Boards were converted into Wages Councils under the Wages Councils Act of 1945. The Linen and Cotton Handkerchief and Household Goods and Linen Piece Goods Wages Council was still in existence in 1988.

Relevant documents at the Modern Records Centre include:

M

Made-up Textiles Trade Board (Great Britain)

The Made-up Textiles Trade Board was established on 24 November 1920 and was converted into a Wages Council under the Wages Councils Act of 1945. The Made-up Textiles Wages Council was still in existence in 1988.

Relevant documents at the Modern Records Centre include:

Mallon, James Joseph (1874-1961)

James Joseph Mallon (usually referred to as J.J.) was a key figure in the establishment and administration of Trade Boards in the UK.

Mallon was born in Manchester in 1874 and apprenticed to a jeweller. He became active in the Shop Assistants' Union and joined the Independent Labour Party, and then the Labour Party, standing as a parliamentary candidate in 1918, 1922 and 1923.

In 1906 Mallon moved from Manchester to London and took on the role of Secretary to the National Anti-Sweating League. From 1909 onwards, he was instrumental in the administration of multiple trade boards, acting as a representative of the workers on many and co-ordinating the trade union response through his work as Secretary of the Trades Union Congress' Trade Boards Advisory Council. Mallon served as Secretary of the Trade Boards Advisory Council (renamed the Wages Councils Advisory Council in 1948) from the Council's formation in 1921 until the late 1950s.

In 1919 Mallon was appointed Warden of Toynbee Hall, a university-affiliated centre for social reform in the East End of London, a position that he held until his retirement in 1954.

Milk Distributive Trade Boards

Three separate Trade Boards were created in 1920: Milk Distributive Trade Board for England and Wales (established on 27 February 1920); Milk Distributive Trade Board for Ireland (established on 6 August 1920); and Milk Distributive Trade Board for Scotland (established on 17 August 1920). In 1922 the Irish Board was transferred to the control of the Irish government and separate Trade Board was created for Northern Ireland.

The Trade Boards were converted into Wages Councils under the Wages Councils Act of 1945. The Milk Distributive Wages Council (England and Wales) was abolished in 1975 and the Milk Distributive Wages Council (Scotland) was abolished in 1976.

Relevant documents at the Modern Records Centre include:

N

National Anti-Sweating League

The National Anti-Sweating League was formed in 1906, to build on the success of the Daily News 'Sweated industries' exhibition in London, and was led by its Secretary J.J. Mallon.

The organisation campaigned for the introduction of a minimum wage in 'sweated' (exploitative and poorly paid) industries through a series of 'agitations', including public speeches from prominent figures such as George Bernard Shaw, G.K. Chesterton and H.G. Wells, marches of ill-paid women through fashionable areas of London (led by Mary Macarthur), and, most notably, exhibitions of 'sweated' industry, where the workers themselves were put on display. The League combined public activism with political lobbying, meeting with the Liberal Prime Minister Herbert Asquith and inducing the leading Conservative Lord Milner to speak publicly in favour of a minimum wage. The Trade Boards Act was passed in 1909, and Britain's first minimum wage was introduced in selected 'sweated' industries.

O

Objections

The 1909 Trade Board Act included the requirement that:

"Before fixing any minimum time-rate or general minimum piece-rate, the Trade Board shall give notice of the rate which they propose to fix, and consider any objections to the rate which may be lodged with them within three months."

Objections to the rates of wages proposed by the Trade Board could be sent in by any interested parties - individual employers or workers, employers' associations or trade unions (at local or national level). In general, employers objected that the wages were too high and workers (and trade unions) objected that wages were too low, but there were exceptions on both sides.

The Trade Board papers at the Modern Records Centre include typed copies of the letters of objection received by the Trade Boards, some of which include details about the working lives of the individual authors.

Ostrich and Fancy Feather and Artificial Flower Trade Board (Great Britain)

The Ostrich and Fancy Feather and Artificial Flower Trade Board was established on 3 February 1921 and was converted into a Wages Council under the Wages Councils Act of 1945. The Ostrich and Fancy Feather and Artificial Flower Wages Council was still in existence in 1988.

Relevant documents at the Modern Records Centre include:

A selection of documents relating to the Ostrich and Fancy Feather and Artificial Flower Trade Board have been digitised and are available online

P

Paper Bag Trade Board

The Paper Bag Trade Board (Great Britain) was established on 14 July 1919, converted into a Wages Council under the Wages Councils Act of 1945, and abolished in 1969.

Relevant documents at the Modern Records Centre include:

Paper Box Trade Boards

The Paper Box Trade Board (Great Britain) was one of the founding four trade boards, and was established on 29 July 1910. A Paper Box Trade Board for Ireland was established on 5 September 1911 and transferred to the control of the Irish government in 1922. A separate Trade Board for Northern Ireland was created in 1922. The Paper Box Wages Council was abolished in 1975.

Relevant documents at the Modern Records Centre include:

A selection of documents relating to the Paper Box Trade Board have been digitised and are available online

Perambulator and Invalid Carriage Trade Board

The Perambulator and Invalid Carriage Trade Board (Great Britain) was established on 20 January 1920 and was converted into a Wages Council under the Wages Councils Act of 1945. The Perambulator and Invalid Carriage Wages Council was still in existence in 1988.

Relevant documents at the Modern Records Centre include:

Permits of exemption

The 1909 Trade Board Act included a clause which allowed employers to pay less than the minimum wage:

"If a Trade Board are satisfied that any worker employed, or desiring to be employed, on time work in any branch of a trade to which a minimum time-rate fixed by the Trade Board is applicable is affected by any infirmity or physical injury which renders him incapable of earning that minimum time-rate, and are of opinion that the case cannot suitably be met by employing the worker on piecework, the Trade Board may, if they think fit, grant to the worker, subject to such conditions, if any, as they prescribe, a permit exempting the employment of the worker from the provisions of this Act rendering the minimum time-rate obligatory, and, while the permit is in force, an employer shall not be liable to any penalty for paying wages to the worker at a rate less than the minimum time-rate so long as any conditions prescribed by the Trade Board on the grant of the permit are complied with."

The permits of exemption (from paying the full rate of wages) were issued by the Trade Boards to workers who were regarded as having physical or psychological disabilities which affected the speed or quality of their work. The request for a permit could be initiated by the employer or worker, or suggested during a factory visit by the Trade Board inspector. Permits were usually issued for specified wage rates and working hours, and covered a set period of time. Once the set period of time expired, the case would be re-assessed and the permit could be renewed.

In the majority of applications included in the Trade Board papers at the Modern Records Centre, the individual applicant is not identified by name. Information is given about the age, work and health of the employee, and the name of the employer. In some cases additional information about the background of the worker can be included, for example references to their family, education or previous work.

Reasons given for the applications can vary considerably, but include old age, blindness or deafness, restricted growth, loss of fingers or limbs, 'nerves', epilepsy or being in some way mentally 'subnormal'.

Pin, Hook and Eye and Snap Fastener Trade Board

The Pin, Hook and Eye and Snap Fastener Trade Board (Great Britain) was established on 17 February 1920 and was converted into a Wages Council under the Wages Councils Act of 1945. It was abolished in 1980.

Relevant documents at the Modern Records Centre include:

Popplewell, Frank

Frank Popplewell was a civil servant within the Ministry of Labour and worked as Secretary of the Office of Trade Boards until 1934, when he was succeeded by R.J. Humphreys.

Popplewell was awarded an OBE for his work as Secretary of the Office of Trade Boards in 1927, and later served as Secretary on the Royal Commission for Workmen's Compensation, 1938-44.

Frank Popplewell was husband of the suffragette Nina Popplewell (formerly Marks), who, prior to her marriage, had worked at the Office of Trade Boards as an assistant secretary. Nina Popplewell's papers are held by the Women's Library, London.

R

Ready-made and Wholesale Bespoke Tailoring Trade Boards

Ready-made and Wholesale Bespoke Tailoring Trade Boards for Great Britain and Ireland were established on 17 February 1920 and 24 April 1920. They were created to partially replace the Tailoring Trade Board.

The Irish Board was transferred to the control of the Irish government in 1922 and the British Board was converted into a Wages Council under the Wages Councils Act of 1945. The Ready-made and Wholesale Bespoke Tailoring Wages Council (Great Britain) was abolished in 1981 and replaced by the Clothing Manufacturing Wages Council (Great Britain).

Relevant documents at the Modern Records Centre include:

Retail Bespoke Tailoring Trade Boards

The Retail Bespoke Tailoring Trade Board for Great Britain was established on 12 December 1919 and split into two separate Trade Boards (one for England and Wales, the other for Scotland) in 1924. The Retail Bespoke Tailoring Trade Board for Ireland was established on 24 April 1920 and transferred to the control of the Irish government in 1922, a separate Retail Bespoke Tailoring Trade Board for Northern Ireland was created in 1922. The Retail Bespoke Tailoring Trade Boards were created to partially replace the Tailoring Trade Board.

The Trade Boards was converted into Wages Councils under the Wages Councils Act of 1945. The Retail Bespoke Tailoring Wages Council (England and Wales) and Retail Bespoke Tailoring Wages Council (Scotland) were merged in 1977.

Relevant documents at the Modern Records Centre include:

Rope, Twine and Net Trade Boards

Two separate Trade Boards were created in 1919-20: Rope, Twine and Net Trade Board for Great Britain (established on 3 December 1919) and Rope, Twine and Net Trade Board for Ireland (established on 21 April 1920 and transferred to the control of the Irish government in 1922). A separate Trade Board for Northern Ireland was created in 1922.

The Trade Boards were converted into Wages Councils under the Wages Councils Act of 1945. The Rope, Twine and Net Wages Council was still in existence in 1988.

Relevant documents at the Modern Records Centre include:

Rubber Manufacturing Trade Board

The Rubber Manufacturing Trade Board (Great Britain) was formed in 1938, converted into a Wages Council under the Wages Councils Act of 1945, and abolished in 1958.

Relevant documents at the Modern Records Centre include:

  • Rubber Manufacturing Wages Council: file, 1948-1958, included in the archives of the Transport and General Workers' Union
Rubber Reclamation Trade Board

The Rubber Reclamation Trade Board was established in 1938, converted into a Wages Council under the Wages Councils Act of 1945, and abolished in 1955.

Relevant documents at the Modern Records Centre include:

S

Sack and Bag Trade Board

The Sack and Bag Trade Board (Great Britain) was established on 2 November 1921 and was converted into a Wages Council under the Wages Councils Act of 1945. The Sack and Bag Wages Council was still in existence in 1988.

Relevant documents at the Modern Records Centre include:

Select Committee on Home Work (1908)

The Select Committee on Home Work was established by the Liberal government in 1908 to "consider and report upon the conditions of labour in trades in which Home Work is prevalent and the proposals, including those for the establishment of wages boards and the licensing of work places, which have been made for the remedying of existing abuses".

The Select Committee report was published in 1908 (the University of Michigan's copy has been digitised and is available online), and recommended the creation of wage boards to fix minimum wages as "it is quite as legitimate to establish by legislation a minimum standard of remuneration as it is to establish such a standard of sanitation, cleanliness, ventilation, air space, and hours of work." The report argued that if an industry could only survive by paying low wages insufficient to buy "the necessaries of life", "it is a parasite industry, and it is contrary to the general well-being that it should continue".

Shirtmaking Trade Boards

Two separate Trade Boards were created in 1914: Shirtmaking Trade Board for Great Britain (established on 6 February 1914) and Shirtmaking Trade Board for Ireland (established on 14 May 1914). In 1922 the Irish Board was transferred to the control of the Irish government and a separate Trade Board for Northern Ireland was created.

The Trade Boards were converted into Wages Councils under the Wages Councils Act of 1945. The Shirtmaking Wages Council was abolished in 1981 and replaced by the Clothing Manufacturing Wages Council (Great Britain).

Relevant documents at the Modern Records Centre include:

A selection of documents relating to the Shirtmaking Trade Boards have been digitised and are available online

Stamped or Pressed Metalwares Trade Board

The Stamped or Pressed Metal Wares Trade Board (Great Britain) was established on 13 February 1920, converted into a Wages Council under the Wages Councils Act of 1945, and abolished in 1974.

Relevant documents at the Modern Records Centre include:

Sugar Confectionery and Food Preserving Trade Boards

Separate Trade Boards were created for Britain and Ireland in 1914: Sugar Confectionery and Food Preserving Trade Board for Great Britain (established on 6 February 1914) and Sugar Confectionery and Food Preserving Trade Board for Ireland (established on 8 May 1914 and transferred to the control of the Irish government in 1922). A separate Trade Board for Northern Ireland was created in 1924.

The Sugar Confectionery and Food Preserving Wages Council was abolished in 1963.

Relevant documents at the Modern Records Centre include:

T

Tailoring Trade Board

The Tailoring Trade Board was established in 1911 and in 1919-1920 replaced by the Retail Bespoke Tailoring Trade Board for Great Britain and the Ready-made and Wholesale Bespoke Tailoring Trade Boards for Great Britain and Ireland.

Relevant documents at the Modern Records Centre include:

A selection of documents relating to the Tailoring Trade Board have been digitised and are available online

Tin Box Trade Board

The Tin Box Trade Board (Great Britain) was established on 30 July 1914, converted into a Wages Council under the Wages Councils Act of 1945, and abolished in 1960.

Relevant documents at the Modern Records Centre include:

A selection of documents relating to the Tin Box Trade Board have been digitised and are available online

Tobacco Trade Boards

Two separate Trade Boards were created in 1919: Tobacco Trade Board for Great Britain (established on 23 April 1919) and Tobacco Trade Board for Ireland (established on 13 August 1919 and transferred to the control of the Irish government in 1922). A separate Trade Board for Northern Ireland was created in 1922. The Trade Boards were converted into Wages Councils under the Wages Councils Act of 1945.

Relevant documents at the Modern Records Centre include:

Toy Trade Board

The Toy Trade Board (Great Britain) was established on 19 August 1920 and was converted into a Wages Council under the Wages Councils Act of 1945. The Toy Manufacturing Wages Council (Great Britain) was still in existence in 1988.

Relevant documents at the Modern Records Centre include:

  • File, 1935-1971, included in the archives of the Transport and General Workers Union
Trade Board (Employers') Consultative Council

The Trade Board (Employers') Consultative Council was established in 1919 and superseded by the Wages Councils (Employers') Consultative Committee following the Wages Council Act, 1945. The British Employers' Confederation and National Confederation of Employers' Organisations provided regular secretarial and administrative help to the council before 1939.

The Modern Records Centre holds a series of correspondence and subject files relating to the work of the Council between 1919-1960

Trade Boards Advisory Council

The Trade Boards Advisory Council was established by the Trades Union Congress in 1921, and renamed the Wage Councils Advisory Council in 1948.

The founding objects of the Trade Boards Advisory Council were to act as the representative and co-ordinating body for the Unions affiliated to the Trades Union Congress and represented on Trade Boards, to (1) secure a common Trade Union policy regarding the methods adopted by the Government in establishing Trade Boards; (2) act in consultation with the General Council of the Trades Union Congress on all questions relating to Trade Boards which are of general interest to the Unions affiliated to Congress; and (3) make when necessary joint representations to the Government on behalf of the Trade Unions represented on Trade Boards; to secure joint consultation between the Unions represented on Trade Boards on all questions relating to Trade Boards' regulations dealing with wages, hours, conditions of employment, or other occupational interests of the members of affiliated societies, and to make joint recommendations on these questions as and when necessary.

Members were appointed by the executives of trade unions affiliated to the Trades Union Congress and represented on Trade Boards, and included prominent figures within the trade union movement. Members of the Executive Committee of the Trade Boards Advisory Council during the 1920s included Joseph Hallsworth, Margaret Bondfield, J.W. Bowen, Fred Bramley, Andrew Conley, Mary Quaile, Madeleine Symons, E.L. Poulton, Ben Turner, H.H. Elvin, Julia Varley, William Elger, Anne Loughlin, Archie Henderson and John Jagger. J.J. Mallon served as Secretary from the Council's formation in 1921 until the late 1950s, and was a key figure in its administration.

W

Wages Councils Act (1945)

Act of Parliament passed in 1945. It converted the existing Trade Boards into Wages Councils, which continued to set minimum wages in selected industries.

Several new Wages Councils were formed after 1945, many of which dealt with the retail or hospitality industries. These included:

  • Hairdressing Undertakings (Great Britain), formed in 1947 and still in existence in 1988
  • Licensed Non-Residential Establishment, formed in 1945
  • Licensed Residential Establishment and Licensed Restaurant, formed in 1945
  • Retail Bookselling and Stationery Trades (Great Britain), formed in 1947 and amalgamated with other councils in 1979 to form the Retail Trades (Non-Food) Wages Council (Great Britain)
  • Retail Bread and Flour Confectionery (England and Wales) and Retail Bread and Flour Confectionery (Scotland), both formed in 1953 and amalgamated with other councils in 1979 to form the Retail Food and Allied Trades Wages Council (Great Britain)
  • Retail Drapery, Outfitting and Footwear Trades (Great Britain), formed in 1948 and and amalgamated with other councils in 1979 to form the Retail Trades (Non-Food) Wages Council (Great Britain)
  • Retail Food Trades (England and Wales), formed in 1947 and amalgamated with other councils in 1979 to form the Retail Food and Allied Trades Wages Council (Great Britain)
  • Retail Food Trades (Scotland), formed in 1948 and amalgamated with other councils in 1979 to form the Retail Food and Allied Trades Wages Council (Great Britain)
  • Retail Furniture and Allied Trades (Great Britain), formed in 1948 and amalgamated with other councils in 1979 to form the Retail Trades (Non-Food) Wages Council (Great Britain)
  • Retail Newsagency, Tobacco and Confectionery Trades (England and Wales), formed in 1947 and amalgamated with other councils in 1979 to form the Retail Food and Allied Trades Wages Council (Great Britain)
  • Retail Newsagency, Tobacco and Confectionery Trades (Scotland), formed in 1947 and amalgamated with other councils in 1979 to form the Retail Food and Allied Trades Wages Council (Great Britain)
  • Road Haulage, formed as a Central Wages Board in 1938 and converted into a Wages Council in 1948
  • Rubber Proofed Garment Making Industry, formed in 1956 and amalgamated with other clothing councils to form the Clothing Manufacturing Wages Council (Great Britain)
  • Unlicensed Residential Establishments (Great Britain), formed in 1945 but never functioned
  • Unlicensed Place of Refreshment, still in existence in 1988

Catering Wages Boards were created as a result of the 1943 Catering Wages Act, and subsequently converted into Wages Councils.

Wholesale Mantle and Costume Trade Boards

Two separate Trade Boards were created in 1919-20: Wholesale Mantle and Costume Trade Board for Great Britain (established on 13 December 1919) and Wholesale Mantle and Costume Trade Board for Ireland (established on 31 March 1920). In 1922 the Irish Board was transferred to the control of the Irish government in 1922 and a separate Trade Board for Northern Ireland was created.

The Trade Boards were converted into Wages Councils under the Wages Councils Act of 1945. The Wholesale Mantle and Costume Wages Council was abolished in 1981 and replaced by the Clothing Manufacturing Wages Council (Great Britain).

Relevant documents at the Modern Records Centre include: