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German and Economics (BA) (Full-Time, 2021 Entry)


UCAS Code
RN21

Qualification
Bachelor of Arts (BA)

Duration
4 years full-time, normally including a year abroad

Start Date
27 September 2021

Department of Study
School of Modern Languages

Location of Study
University of Warwick


A modern languages degree equips you with excellent communication, research, critical and evaluative skills, all of which are highly sought after by employers. Our German and Economics (BA) degree enables you to acquire in-depth relevant linguistic and cultural studies while developing your ability as an analyst of international economic phenomena.


Course overview

Economics plays a part in every aspect of modern life, investigating the choices of consumers and corporations, groups and governments, networks and nations. It uses scientific methods to develop theoretical models of behaviour and markets, institutions and public policy. This joint degree enables you to acquire in-depth relevant linguistic and cultural studies while developing your ability as an analyst of international economic phenomena. You will spend half of your time in the School of Modern Languages and Cultures and the other in the Department of Economics. You will normally spend your second or third year abroad, consolidating and enhancing your learning.


Course structure

In your first year, you will follow a core German language programme at either beginner or advanced level, designed to develop your knowledge and understanding of written and spoken German. You will also be able to choose between two cultural modules to focus on either aspects of German culture in the late eighteenth century or the history and culture of German society since 1945. Both of these modules provide an excellent foundation for studying further aspects of German history, culture and society in the later stages of your degree. You’ll also have two core modules in Economics.

In intermediate and final year, and in addition to core and optional modules in Economics, you will further develop your language skills, and your own interests beyond the language. Our modules reflect the research specialisms of academics in German and cover a broad range of subjects in German culture, business, society, literature, film, history and philosophy. You can also opt to study some of our interdisciplinary cross-School modules.

You can choose to spend your year abroad studying at a university in a German speaking country or on a British Council Assistantship or a work placement. Currently, during the year abroad, students usually attend a residential orientation course in Germany at Easter time. Led by departmental staff, who travel out to lead the event, the course offers skills development, pastoral care, careers advice and guidance on final year study.


How will I learn?

We employ a variety of teaching styles, including: lectures; seminars of about 15 students, in which the emphasis is on student participation; and written and spoken language classes in small groups. You will spend the rest of your time studying independently, preparing for classes, reading and analysing materials set for study, writing essays and working on your language skills.


Contact hours

12 hours per week (15 hours per week in first year).


Class size

Seminars generally involve around 15 students.


How will I be assessed?

We will track your progress through language assignments, essays, presentations, portfolio submissions and examinations (written and oral). Throughout your course you will receive detailed, personalised feedback to help you to improve your skills.

The final degree classification is determined by your intermediate- and final-year marks; each of these years contributes 50%.


Your year abroad

We strongly recommend that students take a year abroad, if they are able to. Students may move to a three-year degree if circumstances do not permit them to complete a year abroad. In such cases, there will be further language reinforcement work and students will be encouraged to spend time abroad in other ways, during vacation times.

You will usually spend your year abroad doing one of three things:

  • Working as a language assistant teaching English in a primary or secondary school
  • Studying full-time at a partner university in your chosen country
  • On a work placement

The year abroad options are flexible so we recommend you check the department's subject pages for more details.

General entry requirements

A level:

  • AAB to include a modern or classical language
  • You will also need grade A/grade 7 in GCSE Mathematics

IB:

  • 36 to include 5 at Higher Level in a modern or classical language
  • plus either GCSE Mathematics grade A/grade 7 or 5 in Higher Level/6 in Standard Level Maths

BTEC:

  • We welcome applications from students taking a BTEC alongside an A level in a modern or classical language
  • You will also need grade A/grade 7 in GCSE Mathematics

Additional requirements:

You will also need to meet our English Language requirements.


International Students

We welcome applications from students with other internationally recognised qualifications.

Find out more about international entry requirements.


Contextual data and differential offers

Warwick may make differential offers to students in a number of circumstances. These include students participating in the Realising Opportunities programme, or who meet two of the contextual data criteria. Differential offers will be one or two grades below Warwick’s standard offer (to a minimum of BBB).


Warwick International Foundation Programme (IFP)

All students who successfully complete the Warwick IFP and apply to Warwick through UCAS will receive a guaranteed conditional offer for a related undergraduate programme (selected courses only).

Find out more about standard offers and conditions for the IFP.


Taking a gap year

Applications for deferred entry welcomed.


Interviews

We do not typically interview applicants. Offers are made based on your UCAS form which includes predicted and actual grades, your personal statement and school reference.

Year One


Modern German Language 1

You will develop your translation, grammatical and speaking skills in German, and in doing so broaden your vocabulary and range of idiom, expression and awareness of various stylistic registers. You will work in a pair or group on a media project under the supervision of a tutor, which will contribute to your end-of-year mark in spoken German.

OR

Modern German Language for Beginners

As a beginner in the acquisition of the German language, you will cover the main linguistic skills in speaking, listening, writing and reading. You will focus on gaining grammatical accuracy as well and communicative fluency and competence. By the end of the year, you will be expected to be able to sustain everyday conversations in German, read authentic texts such as newspaper articles, follow the gist of TV extracts and be able to write an intermediate range of texts in German. You will also work on basic translations to and from German as a means of consolidating your knowledge.


Economics 1

You'll develop an understanding of fundamental and intermediate concepts in micro- and macroeconomic analysis, equipping you with a range of appropriate analytical skills, including descriptive, graphical and mathematical methods. This will develop your ability to analyse economic trends, institutions and politics and the capacity to apply analytical techniques to real-world problems.

Quantitative Techniques

This module combines three modules together; Mathematical Techniques, Statistical Techniques and Computer and Data Analysis. You will cover topics ranging from algebra and calculus to distributions and hypothesis testing. By the end, you will have acquired the skills to understand economic data and have the ability to use a statistical package to analyse data.


Intermediate Year^


Modern German Language 2

In this second-year module, you will increase your general and specialised vocabulary in German through translation into English and German, essay-writing in German, spoken and listening comprehension, and work on business-related materials. In pursuit of these aims, you will learn to identify and rectify grammatical problems, and gain increased sensitivity towards language in general, and an awareness of register, semantics and style in particular. You will also gain important research skills, including correct use of dictionaries.

OR

Modern German Language 2 (Post-beginners)

You will increase the range of your general and specialised vocabulary in German, improve your speaking, listening and comprehension skills, and develop your ability to translate from German, including through a sound knowledge of grammar, register, semantic nuances and style. There will be opportunities to write in German and to work on business-related materials.


Economics 2

You'll develop deeper understanding of economic concepts and be introduced to new concepts in both micro- and macroeconomic analysis. These include material drawn from general equilibrium, welfare economics, game theory, rational expectations and time consistency. It will introduce you to the analysis of public policy issues such as market failure and counter-inflation policy, and give you a range of tools to analyse economic problems. Your analysis will be underpinned by a rigorous theoretical understanding acquired on the course.

Final Year

Modern German Language 3

In this third-year module, you will use vocabulary of increasing sophistication in both general and specialised fields, and improve your skills in spoken and written German and translation. You will improve your listening and reading comprehension skills, and learn to identify and rectify grammatical problems. An important aim of the course is to cultivate sensitivity towards language in general, and an awareness of register, semantics and style in particular.

Research in Applied Economics

You will have the opportunity to deepen and consolidate your knowledge by applying your understanding of economic theory to a research question that arouses your curiosity. You will use a combination of economic analysis and statistical and econometric techniques to formulate and pursue your research interest, supported by lectures on research methodology and supervision by a member of academic staff, who will support your research towards an independent project. The work will increase your confidence in formulating economic questions, and the scientific method of developing a suitable approach, conducting a literature review and data searches, identifying and testing hypotheses and using your findings to construct coherent, persuasive scholarly arguments, presented in both written and oral form.


Examples of optional modules/options for current students:

^Year Two or Three depending on when the year abroad is taken

Tuition fees

Find out more about fees and funding.


Additional course costs

There may be costs associated with other items or services such as academic texts, course notes, and trips associated with your course. Students who choose to complete a work placement or study abroad will pay reduced tuition fees for their third year.


Warwick Undergraduate Global Excellence Scholarship 2021

We believe there should be no barrier to talent. That's why we are committed to offering a scholarship that makes it easier for gifted, ambitious international learners to pursue their academic interests at one of the UK's most prestigious universities. This new scheme will offer international fee-paying students 250 tuition fee discounts ranging from full fees to awards of £13,000 to £2,000 for the full duration of your Undergraduate degree course.

Find out more about the Warwick Undergraduate Global Excellence Scholarship 2021

Your career

This degree course was only recently introduced, so our first cohort of students have not yet graduated.

However, graduates from other Modern Language courses like this one have gone on to work for employers including:

  • Amazon
  • British Airways
  • Civil Service
  • Grayce Consulting
  • HM Revenue and Customs
  • HSBC
  • Ipsos Mori
  • Lidl
  • NBC Universal
  • Save the Children International
  • The Department for International Trade

They have pursued careers such as:

  • Business and financial project management professionals
  • Chartered and certified accountants
  • Financial accounts managers
  • Human resources and industrial relations officers
  • Management consultants and business analysts
  • Public services associate professionals
  • Teachers and other educational professionals

Helping you find the right career

Our department has a dedicated professionally qualified Senior Careers Consultant to support you. They offer impartial advice and guidance, together with workshops and events throughout the year. Previous examples of workshops and events include:

  • What are you doing after Warwick? Career planning for final year language students
  • Careers in the Public Sector
  • Warwick careers fairs throughout the year
  • Completing effective CVs and Application Forms for students from the School of Modern Languages
  • Reflecting on Your Year Abroad
  • Languages Alumni Evening

Find out more about careers support at Warwick.

Isabella, current student

"Friendly and easy to talk to"

"The department is incredible, they’re always on hand to help me whether it was with my year abroad queries or just general language-related issues. The best thing about them is that they’re really friendly and easy to talk to."

Isabella

BA Modern Languages


"I chose Warwick because I really liked it being a campus university. I like how green it is, and I like the thought of everything being very close together. I come from the countryside, so it's not often I could just walk to the shops and have everything in one place. And also because it's a very high-ranked university, so you know that you're going to get good opportunities if you come here."

Fiona

German Studies BA

How did you decide on which languages to study?

"So I'm deaf in one ear and that means I can hear German much more easily than I can hear Spanish or French and on top of that, I really enjoy doing it at school. So I just thought it's a natural progression, really is to do something you enjoy at university and I like the fact that you can go travelling as well, so yeah, it's kind of many different reasons."

Why did you choose to study languages at Warwick?

"I chose Warwick because I really liked it being a campus university and I like how green it is and I like the thought of everything being very close together. I come from the countryside, so it's not often I can just walk to the shops or have everything in one place. And also because it's a very high ranked university, so you know that you're going to get good opportunities if you come here."

What has been your favourite module so far?

"My favourite module would be the Kafka module that I did in second year, because you're studying these texts that you don't really, you don't know how to approach them at first, they're so wacky and strange, so it's quite different you’re a bit out of your comfort zone. I really like the way it was taught as well. It's very discussion based so, much more of a seminar than a lecture and that meant you could kind of ask questions or you could get your views heard."

Why study cultural modules whilst learning a language?

"When you go away and you go to Germany, you see all the statues or museums and you understand, like, who the name is on top of it. That’s quite satisfying seeing someone you’ve studied like, oh, yeah, I actually know who that is. That's why they do them, it's kind of a, it's to get a whole different skill set. To learn the language you learn all the like the grammar and the vocab and how to communicate, but doing the culture, you can then understand like why not to say certain words or like the 'meaning' of history. So you get a lot of different angles when you study culture."

Where did you go for your year abroad?

"So on my year abroad, I was a language assistant in Hanover, so I was teaching English to a college of adults, so it was four adults and there were also a lot of migrants as well. So I really enjoyed teaching the migrants actually, because they had just come to Germany and they were really excited to learn about the different languages and different things and I actually felt quite useful."

What can you do outside of your studies?

"Outside of my studies I volunteer, So at the moment I'm volunteering in the Coventry Refugee and Migrant centre, so, just teaching English to refugees and migrants who have just arrived in the country, which is also following on from what I did my year abroad.

So within the university, there's like a whole bunch of societies you can do and there's also language cafes. So if you want to practice your language, you can go and meet people from the countries, you can do the random partner things so you can meet up with someone, talk half in English, half in German, so I've done that a few times, that’s always like - you feel very, like it helps your degree if you do that, but it's also just fun."

What are your plans after University?

"After uni I would like to do a masters I think. Over the course of uni you kind of narrowed down what you really want to do and so far for me, I like the idea of being able to continue a bit of what I've done at uni, so education a bit, but also go further into it and I would like to go into like educational reform in a way, so how you can make teaching really interesting or how you can make schools more engaging. I don't like learning out of textbooks, so I like the thought of being able to go into a school and be like, “oh, look, I'm not just sitting at a desk the whole day”. So for me, I'm kind of intrigued by that fact at the moment."

About the information on this page

This information is applicable for 2021 entry. Given the interval between the publication of courses and enrolment, some of the information may change. It is important to check our website before you apply. Please read our terms and conditions to find out more.