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e-portfolio of Imogen Knox

Research

My doctoral research, 'Suicide, Self-Harm, and the Supernatural in Britain, 1560-1735', is supervised by Professor Peter Marshall and Dr Naomi Pullin, and funded by the Midlands4Cities Doctoral Training Partnership. My project explores the ways in which early modern people expressed and enacted feelings of suicide and self harm in supernatural narratives. These narratives provide an insight into how individuals conceptualised and negotiated suicidal ideation during a time where the act of suicide was not only criminal, but caused eternal damnation.

Research Interests

  • Early modern religion
  • Supernatural belief
  • Histories of madness and mental health
  • Early modern childhood
  • Material culture

Biography

2020 - 2024 University of Warwick, PhD History

  • 'Suicide, Self-Harm, and the Supernatural in Britain, 1560-1735'

2019 - 2020 Manchester Metropolitan University, Assistant Careers Adviser for Arts & Humanities

  • Before starting my PhD I worked in HE Careers, working directly with students to enhance their employability

2018 - 2019 University of Exeter, MA History (Distinction)

  • 'Suicide, Self-Harm, and the Supernatural in England, 1560-1735', supervised by Professor Jonathan Barry

2015 - 2018 University of Exeter, BA History (First Class)

  • 'Bewitched Children in Late Sixteenth- and Seventeenth-Century England', supervised by Dr Laura Sangha

Conference Papers

Blog Posts

Reports

Responsibilities

Public Engagement

Awards

Additional Achievements

  • Dean's Commendation for Exceptional Achievement, University of Exeter (2019)
  • Dean's Commendation for Contribution to Life of the Department, University of Exeter (2018)
  • Academic Undergraduate Rep of the Year, University of Exeter (2018)

Imogen Knox

Imogen Knox

Imogen.Knox@warwick.ac.uk

Twitter: @Imogen_Knox

M4C Profile

Early Career Member, Royal Historical Society

Terrible Imaginations - my blog on EM supernatural in modern horror

Listen to my recent podcast appearance discussing early modern witchcraft