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ReWAGE launched

ReWAGERenewing Work Advisory Group of Experts – has launched. Hosted by IER with the Centre for Employment Relations, Innovation and Change (CERIC) at Leeds University, it is an expert advisory group to support the government’s strategic response to the recovery and renewal of work and employment in the UK post-Covid. It will sit into 2022.

It will produce evidence papers, policy briefings and reports for government on specialist topics important for maintaining existing jobs, creating new and better jobs and ensuring a return to a well-functioning labour market. Contact ReWAGE for more information.

Tue 10 Aug 2021, 12:37 | Tags: employment, Covid-19

New Futuretrack Reports: Ten Years On - and the impact of the pandemic on graduate careers

The publication of the Futuretrack Stage 5 study conducted in 2019, led by Professors Peter Elias and Kate Purcell and funded by the Nuffield Foundation, showed ‘how the majority of graduates had by then achieved reasonable job security, with many balancing work and parenting or other caring roles when the pandemic hit’ (see press release). In 2020, the research team went back to respondents to investigate how they had been affected by the Covid restrictions and economic impact and conducted Futuretrack Stage 6.

For full details of the research see:

Tue 13 Jul 2021, 18:16 | Tags: graduates, employment, Covid-19

Carrying the work burden of the Covid-19 pandemic: working class women in the UK – final report out now

Clare Lyonette from IER has been collaborating with Professor Tracey Warren from Nottingham University Business School on a 12-month ESRC-funded project on the impact of Covid on working class women. The final report was published to coincide with a webinar on June 18th.

The authors are also presenting their main findings to the Women and Equalities Committee on June 30th, as part of an ESRC Impact Acceleration Account grant, which focuses on disseminating current Covid-related employment research undertaken by IER to relevant UK parliamentarians, with the hope that it will then feed into their deliberations about economic recovery post-Covid.

More information can be found:

Sun 27 Jun 2021, 18:34 | Tags: gender, employment, Covid-19

Employment entry and exit by women in India - blog by Soham Sahoo* and Sudipa Sarkar

While India’s low female labour force participation has been studied extensively in the recent literature, an aspect that has received insufficient attention is the dynamic nature of employment – that is, individuals enter and exit the workforce at various points in time.

Analysing India Human Development Survey data from 2004-05 and 2011-12, this article shows that women have lower entry rates and higher exit rates vis-à-vis men, both in the short and long term. Read more in this blog, published in Ideas for India, here.

* Soham Sahoo, Assistant Professor, Indian Institute of Management Bangalore

Tue 19 Jan 2021, 16:44 | Tags: women, employment, india

Will the Job Support Scheme Work? Blog by Terence Hogarth

The Job Support Scheme announced by the Chancellor of the Exchequer on 24th September is a form of short-time working subsidy found in countries such as Germany and France. If an employee’s working hours are reduced and thereby their pay, the state will make up a third of the lost earnings and the employer a further third. In summary, the scheme is designed to distribute available work over a larger group of workers than would be the case otherwise thereby helping to offset any increase in unemployment resulting from the pandemic.

There is something unusual in the Job Support Scheme: it potentially increases the employer’s labour costs. Take the following example as an illustration.

Someone working 40 hours a week for ₤12.00 an hour has their hours of work reduced to 24 a week. This means that the weekly wage will reduce from ₤480 to ₤288. The employer will pay a third of the employee’s lost earnings (₤64) and the state a further third. The impact of this is to increase the employee’s hourly rate from ₤12.00 to ₤14.67; an increase of 22 per cent. If this were maintained over six months, to when the scheme is currently scheduled to end, the employer will have ended up paying an additional ₤1,651 to the employee for hours worked.

It is hard to escape the fact that it will be cheaper for the employer to retain as many employees working their usual hours and not use of the scheme, and make the others redundant. Of course redundancy costs and potential income from the Job Retention Bonus for previously furloughed employees may offset the employer’s additional hourly labour costs from using the scheme. Plus the employer will retain a full complement of skilled employees to take advantage of the eventual recovery thereby avoiding future recruitment costs or those which result from difficulties finding people with the right skills.

Nevertheless, the potential effectiveness of the Job Support Scheme would appear to be finely poised between success and failure simply because it requires employers to increase their hourly labour costs.

Fri 02 Oct 2020, 11:15 | Tags: employment !Blog Covid-19 job

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