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Integrated Natural Sciences MSci (UCAS CF10)

Integrated Science students in a lab at the University of Warwick

Undergraduate

Find out more about our Integrated Natural Sciences degree at Warwick

MSci Integrated Natural Sciences is a unique course that aims to teach you how to frame and solve scientific problems in a “without boundaries” way.

A radical new approach in the UK, Integrated Natural Sciences (MSci) draws on an understanding of Biology, Chemistry, Physics, Maths and Computing to address fundamental scientific questions about how the natural world works. The course seeks above all to help you develop as a scientist, able to frame good scientific questions about the mechanisms of living systems and to address them effectively by experiment.


General entry requirements

A level typical offer

AAA to include Mathematics and either Biology or Chemistry.

A level additional information

You will also need GCSE English at grade C or grade 4 or above.

A level contextual offer

We welcome applications from candidates who meet the contextual eligibility criteria and whose predicted grades are close to, or slightly below, the contextual offer level. The typical contextual offer is AAB including grade A in Mathematics and grade A in either Biology or Chemistry. See if you're eligible.

General GCSE requirements

Unless specified differently above, you will also need a minimum of GCSE grade 4 or C (or an equivalent qualification) in English Language and either Mathematics or a Science subject. Find out more about our entry requirements and the qualifications we accept. We advise that you also check the English Language requirements for your course which may specify a higher GCSE English requirement. Please find the information about this below.

IB typical offer

36 to include 6 in Higher Level Mathematics and 6 in either Higher Level Biology or Higher Level Chemistry.

IB contextual offer

We welcome applications from candidates who meet the contextual eligibility criteria and whose predicted grades are close to, or slightly below, the contextual offer level. The typical contextual offer is 34 with 6 at Higher Level in Mathematics and 6 in either Higher Level Biology or Higher Level Chemistry. See if you're eligible.

General GCSE requirements

Unless specified differently above, you will also need a minimum of GCSE grade 4 or C (or an equivalent qualification) in English Language and either Mathematics or a Science subject. Find out more about our entry requirements and the qualifications we accept. We advise that you also check the English Language requirements for your course which may specify a higher GCSE English requirement. Please find the information about this below.

BTEC

We welcome applications from students taking BTECs alongside A level Maths.

You will also need to have studied Biology or Chemistry, either at A level or through a relevant BTEC.

Scotland Advanced Highers

AA in two Advanced Highers including Mathematics and either Biology or Chemistry plus AAB in three further Highers subjects.

Welsh Baccalaureate

AAB including grade A in Mathematics and A in either Biology or Chemistry plus grade C in Advanced Welsh Baccalaureate Skills Challenge Certificate.

Access to Higher Education Diplomas

We will consider applicants returning to study who are presenting a QAA-recognised Access to Higher Education Diploma on a case-by-case basis.

Typically, we require 45 Credits at Level 3, including Distinction in 33 Level 3 credits and Merit in 12 Level 3 Credits. We may also require subject specific credits or an A level to be studied alongside the Access to Higher Education Diploma to fulfil essential subject requirements.

General GCSE requirements

Unless specified differently above, you will also need a minimum of GCSE grade 4 or C (or an equivalent qualification) in English Language and either Mathematics or a Science subject. Find out more about our entry requirements and the qualifications we accept. We advise that you also check the English Language requirements for your course which may specify a higher GCSE English requirement. Please find the information about this below.


International qualifications


English Language requirements

All applicants have to meet our English Language requirementsLink opens in a new window. If you cannot demonstrate that you meet these, you may be invited to take part in our Pre-sessional English course at WarwickLink opens in a new window.

This course requires: Band A

Learn more about our English Language requirementsLink opens in a new window.


Frequently asked questions

Warwick may make differential offers to students in a number of circumstances. These include students participating in a Widening Participation programme or who meet the contextual data criteria.

Differential offers will usually be one or two grades below Warwick’s standard offer.

All students who successfully complete the Warwick IFP and apply to Warwick through UCAS will receive a guaranteed conditional offer for a related undergraduate programme (selected courses only).

Find out more about standard offers and conditions for the IFP.

We welcome applications for deferred entry.

We do not typically interview applicants. Offers are made based on your UCAS form which includes predicted and actual grades, your personal statement and school reference.

Course overview

Scientists ask questions about how the world works – especially the natural world – and then work to answer those questions using cycles of conjecture and experiment. Human curiosity leads us to ask basic questions. What is life? What distinguishes the living from the non-living? How do cells work? What causes disease?

MSci Integrated Natural Sciences aims to equip you to pose and answer scientific questions by drawing freely on the methods and mindsets of mathematics, physics, biology, chemistry and computation. By combining the strengths of Warwick's Medical School (WMS)Link opens in a new window and School of Life Sciences (SLS)Link opens in a new window, this course offers you unique opportunities to develop yourself as a scientist. The course is led by a diverse team of biologists, chemists and physicists.

Laboratory experimental work in small teams is a key part of the course right from the outset. Parallel classroom sessions will teach you relevant scientific concepts and methods, ranging across multiple disciplines. Computing as a scientific tool is emphasised throughout the course.

In your second and third years, this integrated approach runs alongside a more in-depth look at the molecular and cellular basis of life. This provides a strong foundation for lab-based experimental research in your fourth year, during which you will pursue your own, self-designed project (we will help you design this) and write a Master’s thesis.

Continue reading about this course.Link opens in a new window

Important information

We are planning to make some exciting changes to our Integrated Natural Sciences (MSci) degree for 2025 entry. We continually review our curricula to reflect developments in the relevant disciplines to deliver the best educational experience, integrating transferable and employability skills through our degrees to improve our graduate outcomes. The core and optional modules will undergo approval through the University's rigorous academic processes. As modules are approved, we will update the course information on this webpage. It is therefore very important that you check this webpage for the latest information before you apply and prior to accepting an offer. Sign up to receive updates.

Student case study


Core modules

Year One

You will be taught by active research scientists with international reputations, who will help you to think creatively and quantitatively, formulate problems, and work effectively to solve them by drawing freely on the methods and mind sets of different scientific disciplines. Laboratory experimental work in small teams begins right from the outset, with parallel classroom sessions to teach you relevant scientific concepts and methods, ranging across multiple disciplines.

Years Two and Three

The Integrated Science approach continues for your cohort, running alongside a more in-depth look at the molecular and cellular basis of life in modules taught by the School of Life Sciences. Core modules include enzymology, protein structure/function, structural molecular biology, and tools for discovery. In both years two and three, these are combined with optional modules chosen from an extensive menu, including the possibility to take courses outside of WMS and School of Life Sciences.

Year Four

You will focus primarily on lab-based experimental research, pursuing your own project, and will write a Master’s thesis. Alongside this, you will choose a number of optional modules in subjects, including essential and transferable research skills, frontier techniques in biomedical research, mathematical modelling of biomedical systems, and programming for biomedical data analysis.

Important information

We are planning to make some exciting changes to our Integrated Natural Sciences (MSci) degree for 2025 entry. We continually review our curricula to reflect developments in the relevant disciplines to deliver the best educational experience, integrating transferable and employability skills through our degrees to improve our graduate outcomes. The core and optional modules will undergo approval through the University's rigorous academic processes. As modules are approved, we will update the course information on this webpage. It is therefore very important that you check this webpage for the latest information before you apply and prior to accepting an offer. Sign up to receive updates.


Year One

Foundational Laboratory Skills and Computing Skills

You’ll study this module as an essential foundation for many of the modules that will follow on the course. We will equip you with the essential core skills in molecular biology and scientific computing, bringing you up to speed with the course philosophy.

Read more about the Foundational Laboratory Skills and Computing Skills moduleLink opens in a new window, including the methods of teaching and assessment (content applies to 2023/24 year of study).

Atoms and Molecules

This module aims to equip you with the conceptual, theoretical and computational skills required for the analysis and engineering of atomic and molecular systems, with an emphasis on biomolecules. You’ll explore the molecules of life, looking at the physics that holds them together, the chemistry by which they react in watery solution and at their structures, motions and reactivities. Looking at self-organisation, you’ll also discuss the very important phenomenon for all living matter: how to generate large scale and defined structures out of a bunch of individual proteins. As part of this module, you will focus on revising and extending your A level skills in Mathematics to support with plotting and fitting data.

Read more about the Atoms and Molecules moduleLink opens in a new window, including the methods of teaching and assessment (content applies to 2023/24 year of study).

Organelles and Cells

This module aims to equip you with the conceptual, theoretical and computational skills required for the analysis and engineering of prokaryotic and eukaryotic organelles and cells. Starting with understanding the principles of light, you’ll also learn how life harnesses electrical forces to communicate and compute information. As the module progresses, you’ll explore chemical and synthetic biology, principally examining biology as macromolecular chemistry and how we can use chemistry to make biological probes. We conclude this module with cell division and underpin the principles of just how does one cell become two?

Read more about the Organelles and Cells moduleLink opens in a new window, including the methods of teaching and assessment (content applies to 2023/24 year of study).

Embryos and Organisms

This module aims to equip you with the conceptual, computational and practical skills required for the analysis and engineering of prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms and their development. You’ll begin with development and unpick a key question in development of life: how are embryos organised? You’ll then move on to immunity, looking at the mechanisms and mathematics of the immune response, considering how do organisms recognise non-self. We’ll finish this module by covering pathogens and parasites and you’ll dissect how parasites have evolved to invade our bodies.

Read more about the Embryos and Organisms moduleLink opens in a new window, including the methods of teaching and assessment (content applies to 2023/24 year of study).

Year Two

Integrated Natural Sciences - Cellular Decision Making

Building on your experience from Year 1, you’ll use mathematical and computational approaches to understand how cells can make decisions. We focus on different forms of feedback, to explain how, for example, cells can display switch-like behaviour. We finish by applying to developmental patterning.

Read more about the Cellular Decision Making moduleLink opens in a new window, including the methods of teaching and assessment (content applies to 2023/24 year of study).

Integrated Natural Sciences - Patterns and Populations

This module is a continuation of the modules covered in Year One of your studies and focuses on molecules, cells and organisms to further increase scale to population level. Using more advanced methods and analysis, you’ll analyse data, model interactions and spatial patterns and link changes at the DNA and transcriptional level to outcomes in spatial developmental patterns, species interaction and population ecology.

Read more about the Patterns and Populations moduleLink opens in a new window, including the methods of teaching and assessment (content applies to 2023/24 year of study).

Integrated Science Tutorials

In this module, we’ll extend the teaching of scientific writing. You’ll be expected to use mostly primary literature in preparing for assessments. This module should enhance your ability to digest primary literature on a variety of topics and write in a scientific manner. It will also support you with additional second year modules that you’re undertaking. You will write detailed and well researched essays, draft components of scientific papers and concisely summarise research findings, research topics in the literature and learn how to critically analyse scientific papers.

Read more about the Integrated Science Tutorials moduleLink opens in a new window, including the methods of teaching and assessment (content applies to 2023/24 year of study).

Enzymology

You will become familiar with the basic methods of studying enzymes, understand the mechanisms whereby enzymes are able to catalyse reactions and appreciate how individual reactions are controlled and integrated into the metabolic pathways of the cell.

Read more about the Enzymology moduleLink opens in a new window, including the methods of teaching and assessment (content applies to 2023/24 year of study).

Protein Structure and Function

Basic concepts of protein structure are built upon in order to understand the structure/function relationships of proteins in terms of the chemistry of their component amino acid residues.

Read more about the Protein Structure and Function moduleLink opens in a new window, including the methods of teaching and assessment (content applies to 2023/24 year of study).

Tools for Biochemical Discovery

On this module, you will examine the principles by which key techniques in the field of biochemical discovery provide biochemical information. This will involve you studying structural techniques such as X-ray, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and cryo-electron microscopy. As well as, biophysical and analytical techniques such as circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy, mass spectrometry and fluorescence. In the second half of the course, you will widen your studies to analyse biological interactions through case studies, covering topics such as proteomics, high-resolution light microscopy, surface plasmon resonance, isothermal titration calorimetry and immunoprecipitation.

Read more about the Tools for Biochemical Discovery moduleLink opens in a new window, including the methods of teaching and assessment (content applies to 2023/24 year of study).

And two of:

Immunology

This module will introduce you to one of the fundamental processes that underpin modern biomedical science: immunology. It considers many disease processes and their mitigation; immunology deals with the basic processes of immunity to infection, but also covers aspect of hypersensitivity and auto-immune disease.

Read more about the Immunology moduleLink opens in a new window, including the methods of teaching and assessment (content applies to 2023/24 year of study).

Ecology and its Applications

In this module you’ll have the opportunity to gain a scientific and interdisciplinary perspective of ecosystems and responses by habitats and species to disturbances cause by a variety of factors. Several major environmental issues are presented along with possible solutions to some of them, using concepts learned through case studies from across the world.

Read more about the Ecology and its Applications moduleLink opens in a new window, including the methods of teaching and assessment (content applies to 2023/24 year of study).

Plant Molecular Development

You will discover the complexity of the eukaryotic cell and its subcellular compartments. You will gain an overview of cell division and its underlying control process, the cell cycle, and how this responds to growth signals and death signals, resulting in cell proliferation and programmed cell death respectively.

Read more about the Plant Molecular Development moduleLink opens in a new window, including the methods of teaching and assessment (content applies to 2023/24 year of study).

Microbial Pathogens

You will be introduced to a range of important microparasites, the diseases they cause and the parasite-host and environmental interactions that govern their biology and approaches to control. Examples include vector-borne and/or zoonotic organisms from Mycobacterium, Trypanosomes, Plasmodium to fungi.

Read more about the Microbial Pathogens moduleLink opens in a new window, including the methods of teaching and assessment (content applies to 2023/24 year of study).

Neuropharmacology

Neuropharmacology is the study of how chemical agents influence bodily functions in both health and disease, and indeed how the body deals with these chemicals. The module will concentrate on the use of drug-based therapeutics in a range of human diseases and will bridge the gap between basic cell signalling, biochemistry and the complex patho-physiology and treatment of the diseases.

Read more about the Neuropharmacology moduleLink opens in a new window, including the methods of teaching and assessment (content applies to 2023/24 year of study).

Neurobiology

This physiology module provides an overview of neurobiology and includes an introduction to the physiology of the nervous system and detailed analysis of the cell and molecular biology underlying the development and functions of the nervous system.

Read more about the Neurobiology moduleLink opens in a new window, including the methods of teaching and assessment (content applies to 2023/24 year of study).

Molecular Endocrinology

This module provides you with a foundation for the further study of endocrinology at the cellular and molecular level and a firm basis for understanding normal hormonal control.

Read more about the Molecular Endocrinology moduleLink opens in a new window, including the methods of teaching and assessment (content applies to 2023/24 year of study).

Explore our second year modules in more detailLink opens in a new window

Year Three

Integrated Science Tutorials

This module focuses on developing your knowledge of how to plan and implement biological experiments. Through a range of practicals and computing sessions, you will enhance your experimental skills and statistical knowledge. This will be utilised in your research projects in years three and four.

Integrated Science Research Project

In this module, you’ll have the opportunity to utilise the research and evaluation skills developed through Years One and Two to produce a substantial piece of research. Ordinarily, you’ll join a WMS research lab and be supervised by the lab head. You’ll get to choose and conduct a research project using an integrated natural sciences approach to address a specific research question. You’ll read and appraise relevant literature, acquire, analyse and interpret data and produce a thesis and oral presentation summarising your findings.

Read more about the Integrated Science Research Project moduleLink opens in a new window, including the methods of teaching and assessment (content applies to 2022/23 year of study).

Dynamics of Biological Systems

The study of non-autonomous dynamical systems can shed new light on biological systems. On this module, you will learn how our understanding of cells and cellular pathways can be enhanced by considering them as entities that can change their behaviour both in space and time.

Read more about the Dynamics of Biological Systems moduleLink opens in a new window, including the methods of teaching and assessment (content applies to 2023/24 year of study).

And two of:

  • Protein Targeting
  • Oncology
  • Advanced Immunology
  • Structural Molecular Biology
  • Biological Clocks
  • Integrative Neuroscience
  • Principles of Development
  • Bioenergy and Biorefining
  • Extreme Environmental Biology
  • Synthetic Biology

Explore our third year modules in more detailLink opens in a new window

Year Four

Integrated Science Extended Research Project

This module aims to enable you to perform original high-quality research at the forefront of a field and be exposed to a cutting-edge research environment. It aims to develop your ability to produce and communicate a substantial, independent piece of work drawing on skills from at least two disciplines.

Read more about the Integrated Science Extended Research Project moduleLink opens in a new window, including the methods of teaching and assessment (content applies to 2023/24 year of study).

Plus a total of 30 CATs from the following options:

  • Essential and Transferrable Research Skills (30 CATs)
  • Frontier Techniques in Biomedical Research (20 CATs)
  • Physical Biology of the Cell (10 CATs)
  • Mathematical Modelling of Biomedical Systems (10 CATs)
  • Programming for Biomedical Data Analysis (10 CATs)

Explore our fourth year modules in more detailLink opens in a new window

Assessment

You will be assessed by a wide range of methods, including assignments, examinations, group assignments, lab reports and individual oral assessment.

The final degree classification is determined by:

  • Year One (15%)
  • Year Two (20%)
  • Year Three (25%)
  • Final Year (40%)

Teaching

This is an innovative programme and you will learn in many different ways.

As well as lectures, seminars, group work and tutorials, you will spend a significant amount of time carrying out laboratory experimental work. This will enable you to learn experimental approaches and techniques and be actively engaged in science and research from the start of the course.


Class sizes

In Year One you will learn entirely with your Integrated Natural Sciences cohort of no more than 25 students, ensuring that you have a high level of academic support.

In Years Two and Three, there will continue to be dedicated small classes for the course along with the opportunity to experience being part of a larger cohort in the School of Life Sciences and wider University. There is also ample opportunity to gain further laboratory experience.

In Year Four you will predominantly be based in a laboratory as a member of your supervisor’s lab, whilst joining classes of up to approximately 30 students for skills training.


Typical contact hours

Around 20 hours per week.

Tuition fees

Tuition fees cover the majority of the costs of your study, including teaching and assessment. Fees are charged at the start of each academic year. If you pay your fees directly to the University, you can choose to pay in instalments.

Undergraduate fees

If you are a home student enrolling in 2024, your annual tuition fees will be £9,250. In the future, these fees might change for new and continuing students.


How are fees set?

The British Government sets tuition fee rates.

Learn more about fees from UCASLink opens in a new window.

Undergraduate fees

If you are an overseas or EU student enrolling in 2024, your annual tuition fees will be as follows:

  • Band 1 – £24,800 per year (classroom-based courses, including Humanities and most Social Science courses)
  • Band 2 – £31,620 per year (laboratory-based courses, plus Maths, Statistics, Theatre and Performance Studies, Economics, and courses provided by Warwick Business School, with exceptions)

Fees for 2025 entry have not been set. We will publish updated information here as soon as it becomes available, so please check back for updates about 2025 fee rates before you apply.


Fee status guidance

We carry out an initial fee status assessment based on the information you provide in your application. Students will be classified as Home or Overseas fee status. Your fee status determines tuition fees, and what financial support and scholarships may be available. If you receive an offer, your fee status will be clearly stated alongside the tuition fee information.

Do you need your fee classification to be reviewed?

If you believe that your fee status has been classified incorrectly, you can complete a fee status assessment questionnaire. Please follow the instructions in your offer information and provide the documents needed to reassess your status.

Find out more about how universities assess fee status.Link opens in a new window


Additional course costs

As well as tuition fees and living expenses, some courses may require you to cover the cost of field trips or costs associated with travel abroad.

For departmental specific costs, please see the Modules tab on this web page for the list of core and optional core modules with hyperlinks to our Module CatalogueLink opens in a new window (please visit the Department’s website if the Module Catalogue hyperlinks are not provided).

Associated costs can be found on the Study tab for each module listed in the Module Catalogue (please note most of the module content applies to 2024/25 year of study). Information about module specific costs should be considered in conjunction with the more general costs below:

  • Core text books
  • Printer credits
  • Dissertation binding
  • Robe hire for your degree ceremony

Further information

Find out more about tuition fees from our Student Finance team.


Scholarships and bursaries

Learn about scholarships and bursaries available to undergraduate students.

We offer a number of undergraduate scholarships and bursaries to full-time undergraduate students. These include sporting and musical bursaries, and scholarships offered by commercial organisations.

Find out more about funding opportunities for full-time students.Link opens in a new window

If you are an international student, a limited number of scholarships may be available.

Find out more information on our international scholarship pages.Link opens in a new window


You may be eligible for financial help from your own government, from the British Council or from other funding agencies. You can usually request information on scholarships from the Ministry of Education in your home country, or from the local British Council office.


Warwick Undergraduate Global Excellence Scholarship

We believe there should be no barrier to talent. That's why we are committed to offering a scholarship that makes it easier for gifted, ambitious international learners to pursue their academic interests at one of the UK's most prestigious universities.

Find out more about the Warwick Undergraduate Global Excellence Scholarship.Link opens in a new window

We provide extra financial support for qualifying students from lower income families. The Warwick Undergraduate Bursary is an annual award of up to £3,000 per annum. It is intended to help with course-related costs and you do not have to pay it back.

Find out more about your eligibility for the Warwick Undergraduate Bursary.Link opens in a new window

As part of the 'City of Sanctuary' movement, we are committed to building a culture of hospitality and welcome, especially for those seeking sanctuary from war and persecution. We provide a range of scholarships to enable people seeking sanctuary or asylum to progress to access university education.

Find out more about the Warwick Undergraduate Sanctuary Scholarships for asylum seekers.Link opens in a new window

Further information

Find out more about Warwick undergraduate bursaries and scholarships.

Eligibility for student loans

Your eligibility for student finance will depend on certain criteria, such as your nationality and residency status, your course, and previous study at higher education level.

Check if you're eligible for student finance.

Tuition Fee Loan

You can apply for a Tuition Fee Loan to cover your tuition fees. It is non-means tested, which means the amount you can receive is not based on your household income. The Loan is paid directly to the University so, if you choose to take the full Tuition Fee Loan, you won’t have to set up any payments.

Maintenance Loan for living costs

You can apply for a Maintenance Loan towards your living costs such as accommodation, food and bills. This loan is means-tested, so the amount you receive is partially based on your household income and whether you choose to live at home or in student accommodation.

Find out more about government student loans for home students residing in England.Link opens in a new window

If you’re starting a course on or after 1 August 2021, you usually must have settled or pre-settled status under the EU Settlement SchemeLink opens in a new window to get student finance.

Tuition Fee Loan

If you are an EU student and eligible for student finance you may be able to get a Tuition Fee Loan to cover your fees. It is non-means tested, which means the amount you may receive is not based on your household income. The Loan is paid directly to the University so, if you choose to take the full Tuition Fee Loan, you won't have to set up any payments.

Help with living costs

For the 2023 academic year, you may be eligible for help with your living costs if both of the following apply:

  • You have lived in the UK for more than 3 years before the first day of the first academic year of your course

And

If you are coming to the UK from 1st January 2021, you may need to apply for a visaLink opens in a new window to study here.

Please note: Irish citizens do not need to apply for a visa or to the EU Settlement Scheme.

Find out more about government student loans for EU studentsLink opens in a new window

Repaying your loans

You will repay your loan or loans gradually once you are working and earning above a certain amount (for students starting their course after 1 August 2023 the repayment threshold is £25,000). Repayments will be taken directly from your salary if you are an employee. If your income falls below the earnings threshold, your repayments will stop until your income goes back up above this figure.

Find out more about repaying your student loan.Link opens in a new window

Your career

This course was launched in 2020, so our first cohort of students have not yet graduated. We expect this innovative course to appeal to enthusiastic scientists wishing to pursue an academic career in scientific research. Potential career paths may include medicine via a graduate-entry medical programme on completion of this degree.


Helping you find the right career

Our department has a dedicated professionally qualified Senior Careers Consultant to support you. They offer impartial advice and guidance, together with workshops and events throughout the year. Previous examples of workshops and events include:

  • Career Society at Medical School Event
  • Warwick careers fairs throughout the year
  • UG to PG Study Information Fair

Find out more about careers support at Warwick.

Life at Warwick

Within a close-knit community of staff and students from all over the world, discover a campus alive with possibilities. A place where all the elements of your student experience come together in one place. Our supportive, energising, welcoming space creates the ideal environment for forging new connections, having fun and finding inspiration.

Keep exploring life at Warwick

Find out how to apply to us, ask your questions, and find out more.

Warwick Accommodation

Finding the right accommodation is key to helping you settle in quickly.

We have a range of residences for undergraduate students on campus.

Explore Warwick Accommodation

Our campus

You won't be short of ways to spend your time on campus - whether it's visiting Warwick Arts Centre, using our incredible new sports facilities, socialising in our bars, nightclub and cafés, or enjoying an open-air event. Or if you need some peace and quiet, you can explore lakes, woodland and green spaces just a few minutes’ walk from central campus.

Explore our campus

Food and drink

We have lots of cafés, restaurants and shops on campus. You can enjoy great quality food and drink, with plenty of choice for all tastes and budgets. There is a convenience store on central campus, as well as two supermarkets and a small shopping centre in the nearby Cannon Park Retail Park. Several of them offer delivery services to help you stay stocked up.

And don't miss our regular food market day on the Piazza with tempting, fresh and delicious street food. Soak up the atmosphere and try something new, with mouth-watering food for all tastes.

Explore food and shops

Explore Students' Union venues

Clubs and societies

We currently have more than 300 student-run societies.

So whether you’re into films, martial arts, astronomy, gaming or musical theatre, you can instantly connect with people with similar interests.

Or you could try something new, or even form your own society.

Explore our societies

Sports and fitness

Staying active at Warwick is no sweat, thanks to our amazing new Sports and Wellness Hub, indoor and outdoor tennis centre, 60 acres of sports pitches, and more than 60 sports clubs.

Whether you want to compete, relax or just have fun, you can achieve your fitness goals.

Explore sports at Warwick

Studying on campus

Our campus is designed to cater for all of your learning needs.

You will benefit from a variety of flexible, well-equipped study spaces and teaching facilities across the University.

  • The Oculus, our outstanding learning hub, houses state-of-the-art lecture theatres and innovative social learning and network areas.
  • The University Library provides access to over one million printed works and tens of thousands of electronic journals
  • Different study spaces offering you flexible individual and group study spaces.

Studying at Warwick

Travel and local area

Our campus is in Coventry, a modern city with high street shops, restaurants, nightclubs and bars sitting alongside medieval monuments. The Warwickshire towns of Leamington Spa and Kenilworth are also nearby.

The University is close to major road, rail and air links. London is just an hour by direct train from Coventry, with Birmingham a 20-minute trip. Birmingham International Airport is nearby (a 20-minute drive).

Travelling from campus

Wellbeing support and faith provision

Our continuous support network is here to help you adjust to student life and to ensure you can easily access advice on many different issues. These may include managing your finances and workload, and settling into shared accommodation. We also have specialist disability and mental health support teams.

Our Chaplaincy is home to Chaplains from the Christian, Jewish and Muslim faiths. We provide regular services for all Christian denominations and a Shabbat meal every Friday for our Jewish students. There is also an Islamic prayer hall, halal kitchen and ablution facilities.

Student support

Chaplaincy

How to apply

Learn more about our application process.

Key dates

Key dates for your application to Warwick.

Writing your personal statement

Make an impression and demonstrate your passion for your course.

After you've applied

Find out how we process your application.

3 ways to connect

Talk to us

Join us at a live event. You can ask about courses, applying to Warwick, life at Warwick, visas and immigration, and more.

See event calendar Link opens in a new window


Warwick Experience

Take a virtual, student-led campus tour. Then join an interactive panel session, where you can hear from and chat to our current students and staff.

Book a tour Link opens in a new window


Student blogs

Explore our student blogs in Unibuddy. You can read about campus life from students themselves, and register to post questions directly to students.

Ask a student Link opens in a new window

Explore campus with our virtual tour

Our 360 tour lets you:

  • Watch student videos
  • View 360 photography and drone footage
  • Learn about facilities and landmarks

Explore our campus virtually through our 360 campus tour now

Come to an Open Day

Don’t just take it from us, come and see for yourself what Warwick is all about. Whether it's a virtual visit or in-person, our University Open Days give you the chance to meet staff and students, visit academic departments, tour the campus and get a real feel for life at Warwick.

Open Days at Warwick

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