Please read our student and staff community guidance on COVID-19
Skip to main content Skip to navigation

Linguistics with German with Intercalated Year (BA) (Full-Time, 2021 Entry)


UCAS Code
Q2R2

Qualification
Bachelor of Arts (BA)

Duration
3 or 4 years full-time, depending on year abroad/work placements

Start Date
27 September 2021

Department of Study
Applied Linguistics

Location of Study
University of Warwick


Applied Linguistics at Warwick offers a unique approach to the study of language: we apply linguistic knowledge and theory to solve real-world problems. On Linguistics with German (BA) you will build an interdisciplinary foundation from leading research in language and communication. Then you will apply your learning to explore, challenge, understand, and address problems and find meaningful solutions. You will be constantly fascinated by the linguistic world around you, and you will be empowered to use language to improve your world.


Course overview

By studying linguistics together with German, you’ll explore the fascinating human capacity for language, while also building your fluency in German. As a linguist, you will learn about the structure and function of language, and about relationships between language and society. You’ll also study and practice written and oral communication in German, and learn broadly about communicating across languages and cultures. Your skills in linguistic analysis will support your language learning, and your knowledge of German will complement your work as a linguist. This course opens many career opportunities that require the knowledge and skills of both a modern language and a deep understanding of language, culture and communication.

(75% linguistics, 25% German).


Course Structure

75% linguistics, 25% modern language. Nine modern languages available to study within the School of Modern Languages and Cultures.

Year One: 120 CATS core (including 30 CATS of language learning).

Year Two: 75 CATS core for Linguistics, plus 30 CATS of language learning; 15 CATS optional for Linguistics modules.

Final Year: 45 CATS core for Linguistics (including Dissertation), plus 30 CATS of language learning; 45 CATS optional.

Students are automatically enrolled on the four-year course, which includes an optional intercalated year in the third year. During the intercalated year, you may pursue a study abroad programme or a work placement (subject to you meeting departmental academic requirements). Students who do not wish to have an intercalated year will be moved to the three-year course.


How will I learn?

You will typically study five to seven modules per year and you will have at least three hours’ contact time per week for each module. This will take the form of lectures, seminars of about 15 students in which you will discuss the lecture topic with the module tutor, and both written and spoken language classes. You will spend independent study time preparing for classes, reading primary texts, writing essays and working on your chosen Language. Additional online materials are available and there will be various events and activities to further enhance your learning. Your own personal tutor will provide additional learning and pastoral support throughout your degree.


Contact hours

12 hours per week.


Class size

Lectures vary depending on the module. Seminars are typically around 15 students.


How will I be assessed?

Assessment will normally take the form of 50% coursework and 50% examination. The final degree classification is determined by your second and final year marks, and each contributes 50%.


Study abroad

If you wish to spend a year abroad (which we thoroughly recommend), this will take place in your third year, meaning that you will complete your degree in four years instead of three. All students have the opportunity to apply for an intercalated year abroad at one of our partner universities. The Student Mobility Team based in the International Student Office offers support for these activities, and the Department’s dedicated Study Abroad Co-ordinator can provide more specific information and assistance.


Work experience

You may decide to make use of the optional intercalated third year by organising a work placement in order to gain a deeper understanding of the social and cultural environment of a relevant work environment. The University Careers Office can advise on potential work placement opportunities; however, it will be entirely your responsibility to find and apply for a work placement.

General entry requirements

A level:

  • AAB. An A level (or equivalent) in your chosen language is not a requirement. However, some evidence of language learning ability (e.g. a language at GCSE) is desirable.

IB:

  • 36

BTEC:

  • We welcome applications from students taking BTECs alongside two A levels
  • Students taking BTECs alongside one A level will be considered on an individual basis

Additional requirements:

You will also need to meet our English Language requirements.


International Students

We welcome applications from students with other internationally recognised qualifications.

Find out more about international entry requirements.


Contextual data and differential offers

Warwick may make differential offers to students in a number of circumstances. These include students participating in the Realising Opportunities programme, or who meet two of the contextual data criteria. Differential offers will be one or two grades below Warwick’s standard offer (to a minimum of BBB).


Warwick International Foundation Programme (IFP)

All students who successfully complete the Warwick IFP and apply to Warwick through UCAS will receive a guaranteed conditional offer for a related undergraduate programme (selected courses only).

Find out more about standard offers and conditions for the IFP.


Taking a gap year

Applications for deferred entry welcomed.


Interviews

We do not typically interview applicants. Offers are made based on your UCAS form which includes predicted and actual grades, your personal statement and school reference.

Year One

Linguistics: Understanding Language

What is language? What is it made of? What rules do we follow when we put sounds together to create words and when we combine words to create sentences? How many languages are spoken in the world today, and in which ways are they similar or different? These are some of the questions that you will explore on this module. Using examples from different languages, you will analyse real-life language data in order to develop the practical skills required for linguistic analysis.

Culture, Cognition and Society

In this module, you will gain a thorough and critical understanding of the concepts, theories and research findings of cognitive and social psychology. You will start by learning the fundamental features of cognition, such as perception, attention and memory, before going on to examine the extent to which cognition is influenced by culture and society. By the end of your studies, you will be able to explain key concepts of culture, cognition and society, and describe their principal applications in cross-cultural psychology.

Language in Society

In this module, you will learn to unpack the ways in which language shapes and is shaped by society. You will analyse critically how language operates in different linguistic and cultural settings, using a range of theoretical concepts, empirical research and methodologies to understand, describe and interpret language use in society. This includes an investigative study of language use, during which you will also develop your communication and study skills.

Research, Academic and Professional Skills

Providing a foundation for modules ET214 and ET215, this module will help you develop the research, academic and professional skills needed to succeed at university and beyond. You will explore research, data-collection and analytical methodologies, using real-life examples of language, culture and communication. You will develop an analytical toolkit to serve you in multiple contexts, including your future career. You will also become familiar with research conventions, including ethical approval, literature review, communication and critical understanding of academic writing.

Language module


Year Two

Linguistics: Structure, Sound and Meaning

This module provides you with intensive instruction in six core domains of linguistics: phonetics, phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics and pragmatics. You will expand substantially on concepts that were introduced to you during Linguistics: Understanding Language. You will work from a wide range of language data to develop your knowledge of findings, theories, and methodologies from these domains. You will build core disciplinary knowledge that is essential to any field of linguistics inquiry, and establish a necessary foundation for advanced linguistic research.

Culture and Interpersonal Relations

This interdisciplinary module will provide you with a multifaceted understanding of the ways that language, culture, and human psychology come together in the process of understanding and communicating meanings in intercultural communication. You will explore concepts and theories from a number of disciplines that attempt to explain the influence of culture on communicative processes. You will also consider how social attitudes affect perceptions of self and other, and how stereotypes and prejudice impact on intercultural communication. In this module, students have many opportunities to take the initiative in their learning and to understand more deeply their own ways of perceiving and responding to cultural diversity.

Sociolinguistics

Why do we speak differently in different situations? Can you identify the features of a Geordie and a Scouse accent? Do men and women speak differently, and if so, why? These are questions you will explore as we examine the relationship between language use and social context. Building on module ET119 (Language in Society), you will develop a greater understanding of linguistic variation. With the opportunity to conduct your own research study, you can expect to complete your course armed with a set of theories, insights and skills to enable you to address such questions, and to explore your own questions about the role of language in society.

Language module


Year Three

Communication Modes

In this module, you will learn how the sounds, gestures and facial expressions we make combine with linguistic choices to give meaning to our messages and influence our interpretation of the messages of others. You will develop a deeper awareness of the impact of different modes of communication and increase your understanding of the research and analysis that underpin our knowledge of human communication in all its complexity.

Dissertation

Do you have a topic or question about Language, Culture and Communication or English Language and Linguistics that you would like to explore in depth? By the time you get to the third year you are likely to have a lot of potential areas of interest. For the dissertation module you get the opportunity to develop a project around one of these interests and, with the support of a supervisor, conduct research and write it up! As well as developing content knowledge in an area of interest to you, the dissertation will help you enhance your research, critical and creative thinking, time management and academic writing skills. The dissertation module also provides excellent training if you are interested in undertaking postgraduate study beyond the BA.

Language module


Examples of optional modules/options for current students

Tuition fees

Find out more about fees and funding.


Additional course costs

There may be costs associated with other items or services such as academic texts, course notes, and trips associated with your course. Students who choose to complete a work placement or study abroad will pay reduced tuition fees for their third year.

Your career

Graduates from these courses are working in:

  • Global PR
  • Consultancies
  • Multinational companies
  • Higher education
  • Further study (masters and doctoral programmes)

Helping you find the right career

Our department has a dedicated professionally qualified Senior Careers Consultant to support you. They offer impartial advice and guidance, together with workshops and events throughout the year. Previous examples of workshops and events include:

  • Linguistics Careers
  • CV Workshop
  • Interview preparation
  • Making the most of your time at Warwick and securing work experience opportunities
  • Warwick careers fairs throughout the year

Find out more about careers support at Warwick.

"Opportunities to engage in research"

“‘Throughout every year of the course I’ve been made very aware of opportunities to engage in research and projects related to and also outside of my degree. I set up a Linguistics-based society organising talks and careers events, conducted two funded research projects working with PhD students and academic professionals, and presented my findings at a prestigious conference. I’m now working on publishing my first paper too.”

Tom

BA Language, Culture and Communication


"I chose Warwick because I really liked it being a campus university. I like how green it is, and I like the thought of everything being very close together. I come from the countryside, so it's not often I could just walk to the shops and have everything in one place. And also because it's a very high-ranked university, so you know that you're going to get good opportunities if you come here."

Fiona

German Studies BA

How did you decide on which languages to study?

"So I'm deaf in one ear and that means I can hear German much more easily than I can hear Spanish or French and on top of that, I really enjoy doing it at school. So I just thought it's a natural progression, really is to do something you enjoy at university and I like the fact that you can go travelling as well, so yeah, it's kind of many different reasons."

Why did you choose to study languages at Warwick?

"I chose Warwick because I really liked it being a campus university and I like how green it is and I like the thought of everything being very close together. I come from the countryside, so it's not often I can just walk to the shops or have everything in one place. And also because it's a very high ranked university, so you know that you're going to get good opportunities if you come here."

What has been your favourite module so far?

"My favourite module would be the Kafka module that I did in second year, because you're studying these texts that you don't really, you don't know how to approach them at first, they're so wacky and strange, so it's quite different you’re a bit out of your comfort zone. I really like the way it was taught as well. It's very discussion based so, much more of a seminar than a lecture and that meant you could kind of ask questions or you could get your views heard."

Why study cultural modules whilst learning a language?

"When you go away and you go to Germany, you see all the statues or museums and you understand, like, who the name is on top of it. That’s quite satisfying seeing someone you’ve studied like, oh, yeah, I actually know who that is. That's why they do them, it's kind of a, it's to get a whole different skill set. To learn the language you learn all the like the grammar and the vocab and how to communicate, but doing the culture, you can then understand like why not to say certain words or like the 'meaning' of history. So you get a lot of different angles when you study culture."

Where did you go for your year abroad?

"So on my year abroad, I was a language assistant in Hanover, so I was teaching English to a college of adults, so it was four adults and there were also a lot of migrants as well. So I really enjoyed teaching the migrants actually, because they had just come to Germany and they were really excited to learn about the different languages and different things and I actually felt quite useful."

What can you do outside of your studies?

"Outside of my studies I volunteer, So at the moment I'm volunteering in the Coventry Refugee and Migrant centre, so, just teaching English to refugees and migrants who have just arrived in the country, which is also following on from what I did my year abroad.

So within the university, there's like a whole bunch of societies you can do and there's also language cafes. So if you want to practice your language, you can go and meet people from the countries, you can do the random partner things so you can meet up with someone, talk half in English, half in German, so I've done that a few times, that’s always like - you feel very, like it helps your degree if you do that, but it's also just fun."

What are your plans after University?

"After uni I would like to do a masters I think. Over the course of uni you kind of narrowed down what you really want to do and so far for me, I like the idea of being able to continue a bit of what I've done at uni, so education a bit, but also go further into it and I would like to go into like educational reform in a way, so how you can make teaching really interesting or how you can make schools more engaging. I don't like learning out of textbooks, so I like the thought of being able to go into a school and be like, “oh, look, I'm not just sitting at a desk the whole day”. So for me, I'm kind of intrigued by that fact at the moment."

This information is applicable for 2021 entry. Given the interval between the publication of courses and enrolment, some of the information may change. It is important to check our website before you apply. Please read our terms and conditions to find out more.