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Language, Culture and Communication with Intercalated Year (BA) (Full-Time, 2021 Entry)


UCAS Code
X3Q8

Qualification
Bachelor of Arts (BA)

Duration
3 or 4 years full-time, depending on year abroad/ work placements

Start Date
27 September 2021

Department of Study
Applied Linguistics

Location of Study
University of Warwick


Applied Linguistics at Warwick offers a unique approach to the study of language: we apply linguistic knowledge and theory to solve real-world problems. On Language, Culture and Communication (BA) you will build an interdisciplinary foundation from leading research in language and communication. Then you will apply your learning to explore, challenge, and address problems and find meaningful solutions. You will be constantly fascinated by the linguistic world around you and will be empowered to use language to improve your world.


Course overview

Warwick’s Language, Culture and Communication degree is a globally unique interdisciplinary program that prepares students to forge careers in the international marketplace. The degree combines elements of linguistics, intercultural communication, social psychology and public relations. You will develop a unique combination of intellectual, analytical, research and communication skills, and apply them in a range of authentic situations. You’ll also develop your expertise in communicating effectively in different contexts, cultures and languages, and acquire first-hand experience of living abroad and working in multicultural contexts.


Course structure

Year One: 120 CATS is core.

Year Two: 75 CATS core and 45 CATS options.

Final Year: 60 CATS core and 60 CATS options.

Students are automatically enrolled on the four-year course, which includes an optional intercalated year in the third year. During the intercalated year, you may pursue a study abroad programme or a work placement (subject to you meeting departmental academic requirements). Students who do not wish to have an intercalated year will be moved to the three-year course.


How will I learn?

You will study six to seven modules per year. Most modules are comprised of a weekly two-hour lecture and one-hour small-group seminar, for three hours of weekly contact time with each tutor. You will spend independent study time preparing for classes, reading primary texts, and completing practical exercises. Practical exercises emphasise student-led research projects. Additional online materials are available and there will be various events and activities to further enhance your learning. Your personal tutor will provide additional learning and pastoral support throughout your degree.


Contact hours

12 hours per week.


Class size

Lectures vary depending on the module. Seminars are typically around 15 students.


How will I be assessed?

Assessment will normally take the form of 50% coursework and 50% examination. The final degree classification is determined by your second and final year marks, and each contributes 50%.


Study abroad

If you wish to spend a year abroad (which we thoroughly recommend), this will take place in your third year, meaning that you will complete your degree in four years instead of three. All students have the opportunity to apply for an intercalated year abroad at one of our partner universities. The Student Mobility Team based in the International Student Office offers support for these activities, and the Department’s dedicated Study Abroad Co-ordinator can provide more specific information and assistance.


Work experience

You may decide to make use of the optional intercalated third year by organising a work placement. The University Careers Office can advise on potential work placement opportunities; however, it will be entirely your responsibility to find and apply for a work placement.

General entry requirements

A level:

  • AAB

IB:

  • 36

BTEC:

  • We welcome applications from students taking BTECs alongside two A levels
  • Students taking BTECs alongside one A level will be considered on an individual basis

Additional requirements:

You will also need to meet our English Language requirements.


International Students

We welcome applications from students with other internationally recognised qualifications.

Find out more about international entry requirements.


Contextual data and differential offers

Warwick may make differential offers to students in a number of circumstances. These include students participating in the Realising Opportunities programme, or who meet two of the contextual data criteria. Differential offers will be one or two grades below Warwick’s standard offer (to a minimum of BBB).


Warwick International Foundation Programme (IFP)

All students who successfully complete the Warwick IFP and apply to Warwick through UCAS will receive a guaranteed conditional offer for a related undergraduate programme (selected courses only).

Find out more about standard offers and conditions for the IFP.


Taking a gap year

Applications for deferred entry welcomed.


Interviews

We do not typically interview applicants. Offers are made based on your UCAS form which includes predicted and actual grades, your personal statement and school reference.

Year One

Linguistics: Understanding Language

What is language? What is it made of? What rules do we follow when we put sounds together to create words and when we combine words to create sentences? How many languages are spoken in the world today, and in which ways are they similar or different? These are some of the questions that you will explore on this module. Using examples from different languages, you will analyse real-life language data in order to develop the practical skills required for linguistic analysis.

Foreign Language Learning

In this module, you will engage in learning a major language in the university’s cutting-edge Language Centre and develop your ability to learn any language in the future. Choosing from Arabic, Chinese, French, German, Italian, Japanese, Russian or Spanish, you will develop your understanding of linguistic diversity, dominance and change, and be able to reflect self-critically on the processes required for second language acquisition.

Culture, Cognition and Society

In this module, you will gain a thorough and critical understanding of the concepts, theories and research findings of cognitive and social psychology. You will start by learning the fundamental features of cognition, such as perception, attention and memory, before going on to examine the extent to which cognition is influenced by culture and society. By the end of your studies, you will be able to explain key concepts of culture, cognition and society, and describe their principal applications in cross-cultural psychology.

Language in Society

In this module, you will learn to unpack the ways in which language shapes and is shaped by society. You will analyse critically how language operates in different linguistic and cultural settings, using a range of theoretical concepts, empirical research and methodologies to understand, describe and interpret language use in society. This includes an investigative study of language use, during which you will also develop your communication and study skills.

Research, Academic and Professional Skills

Providing a foundation for modules ET214 and ET215, this module will help you develop the research, academic and professional skills needed to succeed at university and beyond. You will explore research, data-collection and analytical methodologies, using real-life examples of language, culture and communication. You will develop an analytical toolkit to serve you in multiple contexts, including your future career. You will also become familiar with research conventions, including ethical approval, literature review, communication and critical understanding of academic writing.

Year Two

Linguistics: Structure, Sound and Meaning

This module provides you with intensive instruction in six core domains of linguistics: phonetics, phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics and pragmatics. You will expand substantially on concepts that were introduced to you during Linguistics: Understanding Language. You will work from a wide range of language data to develop your knowledge of findings, theories, and methodologies from these domains. You will build core disciplinary knowledge that is essential to any field of linguistics inquiry, and establish a necessary foundation for advanced linguistic research.

Culture and Interpersonal Relations

This interdisciplinary module will provide you with a multifaceted understanding of the ways that language, culture, and human psychology come together in the process of understanding and communicating meanings in intercultural communication. You will explore concepts and theories from a number of disciplines that attempt to explain the influence of culture on communicative processes. You will also consider how social attitudes affect perceptions of self and other, and how stereotypes and prejudice impact on intercultural communication. In this module, students have many opportunities to take the initiative in their learning and to understand more deeply their own ways of perceiving and responding to cultural diversity.


Qualitative Methods for Undergraduate Research

This module will introduce you to a range of methodologies used in social, historical, cultural and arts-based research. Qualitative research asks “why” and “how” rather than “how many". You’ll engage with theoretical debates. You'll put what you learn into practice by conducting primary research using archival, text-based and interview methodologies. The hands-on research assignments in this module will link to your other core modules so activities will always be relevant to your studies.

OR

Quantitative Research Methods

Building on the foundations in ET120 Research, Academic and Professional Skills, you will progress to developing your research skills through deeper insights into the generic principles of planning, collecting and analysing quantitative data. In addition to weekly engagement with real-life problem-solving tasks, you will be a member of a group project conducting empirical research. You will appreciate the purpose and application of different quantitative research designs and their relevance in applied contexts, such as organisational analysis and consulting. At the end of the module, you will be able to critically review quantitative data and understand its power as well as its limitations, and also demonstrate the skills needed to generate, analyse and interpret such data in the workplace.


Year Three

Communication Modes

In this module, you will learn how the sounds, gestures and facial expressions we make combine with linguistic choices to give meaning to our messages and influence our interpretation of the messages of others. You will develop a deeper awareness of the impact of different modes of communication and increase your understanding of the research and analysis that underpin our knowledge of human communication in all its complexity.


Qualitative Methods for Undergraduate Research

This module will introduce you to a range of methodologies used in social, historical, cultural and arts-based research. Qualitative research asks “why” and “how” rather than “how many". You’ll engage with theoretical debates. You'll put what you learn into practice by conducting primary research using archival, text-based and interview methodologies. The hands-on research assignments in this module will link to your other core modules so activities will always be relevant to your studies.

OR

Quantitative Research Methods

Building on the foundations in ET120 Research, Academic and Professional Skills, you will progress to developing your research skills through deeper insights into the generic principles of planning, collecting and analysing quantitative data. In addition to weekly engagement with real-life problem-solving tasks, you will be a member of a group project conducting empirical research. You will appreciate the purpose and application of different quantitative research designs and their relevance in applied contexts, such as organisational analysis and consulting. At the end of the module, you will be able to critically review quantitative data and understand its power as well as its limitations, and also demonstrate the skills needed to generate, analyse and interpret such data in the workplace.


Dissertation

Do you have a topic or question about Language, Culture and Communication or English Language and Linguistics that you would like to explore in depth? By the time you get to the third year you are likely to have a lot of potential areas of interest. For the dissertation module you get the opportunity to develop a project around one of these interests and, with the support of a supervisor, conduct research and write it up! As well as developing content knowledge in an area of interest to you, the dissertation will help you enhance your research, critical and creative thinking, time management and academic writing skills. The dissertation module also provides excellent training if you are interested in undertaking postgraduate study beyond the BA.


Examples of optional modules/options for current students

Tuition fees

Find out more about fees and funding.


Additional course costs

There may be costs associated with other items or services such as academic texts, course notes, and trips associated with your course. Students who choose to complete a work placement or study abroad will pay reduced tuition fees for their third year.


Warwick Undergraduate Global Excellence Scholarship 2021

We believe there should be no barrier to talent. That's why we are committed to offering a scholarship that makes it easier for gifted, ambitious international learners to pursue their academic interests at one of the UK's most prestigious universities. This new scheme will offer international fee-paying students 250 tuition fee discounts ranging from full fees to awards of £13,000 to £2,000 for the full duration of your Undergraduate degree course.

Find out more about the Warwick Undergraduate Global Excellence Scholarship 2021

Your career

This degree course was only recently introduced, so our first cohort of students have not yet graduated.

However, graduates from other Modern Language courses like this one have gone on to work for employers including:

  • Amazon
  • British Airways
  • Civil Service
  • Grayce Consulting
  • HM Revenue and Customs
  • HSBC
  • Ipsos Mori
  • Lidl
  • NBC Universal
  • Save the Children International
  • The Department for International Trade

They have pursued careers such as:

  • Business and financial project management professionals
  • Chartered and certified accountants
  • Financial accounts managers
  • Human resources and industrial relations officers
  • Management consultants and business analysts
  • Public services associate professionals
  • Teachers and other educational professionals

Helping you find the right career

Our department has a dedicated professionally qualified Senior Careers Consultant to support you. They offer impartial advice and guidance, together with workshops and events throughout the year. Previous examples of workshops and events include:

  • What are you doing after Warwick? Career planning for final year language students
  • Careers in the Public Sector
  • Warwick careers fairs throughout the year
  • Completing effective CVs and Application Forms for students from the School of Modern Languages
  • Reflecting on Your Year Abroad
  • Languages Alumni Evening

Find out more about careers support at Warwick.

"Opportunities to engage in research"

“‘Throughout every year of the course I’ve been made very aware of opportunities to engage in research and projects related to and also outside of my degree. I set up a Linguistics-based society organising talks and careers events, conducted two funded research projects working with PhD students and academic professionals, and presented my findings at a prestigious conference. I’m now working on publishing my first paper too.”

Tom

BA Language, Culture and Communication

About the information on this page

This information is applicable for 2021 entry. Given the interval between the publication of courses and enrolment, some of the information may change. It is important to check our website before you apply. Please read our terms and conditions to find out more.